The Beekman Mansion was built over the course of two years, from 1802 to 1804, for the family of William Beekman.

Beekman's Mansion

The Beekman Mansion was built over the course of two years, from 1802 to 1804, for the family of William…

The Château de Beaumesnil was begun in 1633 by Jacques de Nonant for his wife Marie Dauvet Desmaret. Construction lasted until 1640.Today, Beaumesnil is a commune, the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic, in the Eure department in Haute-Normandie in northern France."Although Du Cerceau was obligated to leave France in the year 1604, the impulse which he had given in the direction of the above-mentioned manner led to its being generally adopted. The new buildings were more correct, but less picturesque than those built during the earlier period of the French Renaissance, and a certain insipidity seems to characterize the various structures erected during the reigns of Henry IV., and especially Louis XIII. As is shown [here], a combination of free-stone and brick was restored to in such a way that the former was employed for the mouldings, and for the quoins and dressings of the doors and windows, whilst brick was used for the spaces between. In the case of the windows the free-stone introduced assumed the forms of quoins. If ornamentation had been previously excessive, it now retired into the background, and was only employed in moderation; and the method of its treatment began to be distinguished from that of the former period. The forms of the details above all began to lose in purity: rustications were inappropriately introduced in the walls and columns, and the roofs were made high and steep, which gave the rest of the building a heavy and squat appearance, whilst the numerous turret-shaped chimneys, which were necessitated by these high roofs, formed a peculiar feature in the construction. The Roccoco, or Baroque Style, was beginning at the same time to exert its influence. Commencing from the second half of the seventeenth century, this new architectural deviation became prevalent in all civilized countries, owing to the splendor and influence of the French power and manners, and the influence of Italian art was consequently paralyzed. [This image] gives a characteristic example of French architecture of this period of the Later Renaissance, showing the peculiarities which have been described above."

Château de Beaumesnil

The Château de Beaumesnil was begun in 1633 by Jacques de Nonant for his wife Marie Dauvet Desmaret.…

The royal Château de Chambord at Chambord, Loir-et-Cher, France is one of the most recognizable châteaux in the world because of its very distinct French Renaissance architecture that blends traditional French medieval forms with classical Italian structures."The artistic influence of Italy came into operation in France sooner than in other European countries, for as early as the fifteenth century the Renaissance style was introduced there by Italian architects, as, for instance, by Fra Giocondo, who was summoned thither by Louis XII. But at the epoch the Flamboyant style was still in its vigour, and the buildings then erected could not extricate themselves from its influence. The consequence was that a blending of the two styles temporarily prevailed, as, for instance in the Château de Blois, which Louis XII. caused to be built, and which has lately been restored by Duban. It was in these country residences of the nobility, especially on the banks of the Loire, that this architectural activity was displayed during the earlier period of the Renaissance; amongst their number the Château de Chambord [shown here] is most worthy of notice. The pilasters and their mouldings of the Renaissance style were, it is true, somewhat rudely carried out, and in the earlier period were combined with certain elements of the Flamboyant style. Highly ornamental gables and dormer-windows. especially, were executed in the latter style. Buildings were contemporaneously constructed entirely in the Flamboyant style, as, for instance, the Cathedral, the Palais de Justice, and the Hâtel Bourgtheroulde, all at Rouen, and the Hâtel de Ville at Compiègne."

Château de Chambord

The royal Château de Chambord at Chambord, Loir-et-Cher, France is one of the most recognizable…

Benjamin Chew (November 19, 1722 - January 20, 1810) was a lawyer, politician and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Province of Pennsylvania. Pictured here is the residence of Justice Chew.

Chew's house

Benjamin Chew (November 19, 1722 - January 20, 1810) was a lawyer, politician and Chief Justice of the…

The Governor's mansion at the capital of Mississippi, Jackson.

Governor's Mansion at Jackson, Miss.

The Governor's mansion at the capital of Mississippi, Jackson.

Hampden House is a country house in the village of Great Hampden, between Great Missenden and Princes Risborough in Buckinghamshire. It is named after the Hampden family. The Hampdens (later Earls of Buckinghamshire) are recorded as owning the site from before the Norman conquest. They lived continually in the house until 1938.

John Hampden's House, Buckinghamshire

Hampden House is a country house in the village of Great Hampden, between Great Missenden and Princes…

Hampton Court Palace is a former royal palace in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London, England. Along with St. James's Palace, it is one of only two surviving palaces out of the many built by Henry VIII.Thomas Wolsey, then Archbishop of York and Chief Minister to the King, took over the lease in 1514 and rebuilt the 14th century manor house over the next seven years (1515–1521) to form the nucleus of the present palace. Wolsey spent lavishly to build the finest palace in England at Hampton Court, which he was later forced to give to Henry as he began to fall from favour.

Hampton Court, 17th Century

Hampton Court Palace is a former royal palace in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west…

Large homes fringed by palm trees on a Florida shoreline.

Coastal homes

Large homes fringed by palm trees on a Florida shoreline.

An image of the old Chouteau mansion located in Missouri.

House

An image of the old Chouteau mansion located in Missouri.

Lindenwald was Martin Van Buren's estate in Albany, New York. It was built in 1841.

Lindenwald, Van Buren's Estate

Lindenwald was Martin Van Buren's estate in Albany, New York. It was built in 1841.

An illustration of a large mansion.

Mansion

An illustration of a large mansion.

"The Villa Medici, from the Terrace." — Young, 1901

Villa Medici

"The Villa Medici, from the Terrace." — Young, 1901

Monticello was Thomas Jefferson's estate in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was built in 1809 and appeared on the nickel and the two dollar bill.

Monticello, Jefferson's Estate

Monticello was Thomas Jefferson's estate in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was built in 1809 and appeared…

Montpelier was James Madison's estate in Orange, Virginia. It was built in 1724.

Montpelier, Madison's Estate

Montpelier was James Madison's estate in Orange, Virginia. It was built in 1724.

Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478 – 6 July 1535), from 1935 Saint Thomas More, was an English lawyer, author, and statesman who in his lifetime gained a reputation as a leading humanist scholar, and occupied many public offices, including Lord Chancellor (1529–1532), in which he had numerous Protestant Christians burned at the stake. More coined the word "utopia", a name he gave to an ideal, imaginary island nation whose political system he described in the eponymous book published in 1516. He was beheaded in 1535 when he refused to sign the Act of Supremacy that declared Henry VIII Supreme Head of the Church in England.

Sir Thomas More's House, Chelsea

Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478 – 6 July 1535), from 1935 Saint Thomas More, was an English lawyer,…

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. The mansion is built of wood in neoclassical Georgian architectural style, and the estate is located on the banks of the Potomac River.

Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the…

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. The mansion is built of wood in neoclassical Georgian architectural style, and the estate is located on the banks of the Potomac River.

Mount Vernon in Washington's Day

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the…

A North Carolina mansion of the old style.

A North Carolina Mansion

A North Carolina mansion of the old style.

Oak Hill Plantation was James Monroe's estate in Loudoun County, Virginia. It was built for the fifth U.S. president in 1808.

Oak Hill Plantation, Monroe's Estate

Oak Hill Plantation was James Monroe's estate in Loudoun County, Virginia. It was built for the fifth…

The Palace of Versailles, or simply Versailles, is a royal château in Versailles, the île-de-France region of France. In French, it is known as the Château de Versailles."It was principally the above-mentioned system of Roccoco decoration and architectural detail which characterized the architecture of the time of Louis XV.; it is, consequently, sometimes designated as the style of Louis XV." This image depicts the entire wall."Internal arrangement and decoration are the main characteristics of the style of this period, and in this direction the best results were doubtless produced. Large and lofty rooms, as well as scope for display, were indispensable; consequently this style of embellishment was most happily carried out in each state apartments, especially in the princely castles and palaces, or, as the French call them, the "Hôtels" of the aristocracy."

Saloon in the Palace of Versailles

The Palace of Versailles, or simply Versailles, is a royal château in Versailles, the île-de-France…

The Palace of Versailles, or simply Versailles, is a royal château in Versailles, the île-de-France region of France. In French, it is known as the Château de Versailles."It was principally the above-mentioned system of Roccoco decoration and architectural detail which characterized the architecture of the time of Louis XV.; it is, consequently, sometimes designated as the style of Louis XV. [This image] gives a portion of an interior drawn in perspective.""Internal arrangement and decoration are the main characteristics of the style of this period, and in this direction the best results were doubtless produced. Large and lofty rooms, as well as scope for display, were indispensable; consequently this style of embellishment was most happily carried out in each state apartments, especially in the princely castles and palaces, or, as the French call them, the "Hôtels" of the aristocracy."

Saloon in the Palace of Versailles

The Palace of Versailles, or simply Versailles, is a royal château in Versailles, the île-de-France…

Peacefield or Old House was the estate of both presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams in Quincy, Massachusetts.

Peacefield, Adam's Estate

Peacefield or Old House was the estate of both presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams in Quincy,…

This house, located on the 500 block of Market Street, served as the executive mansion of the United States, while the nation's capital was located in Philadelphia, PA. Two Presidents occupied the house while in office, George Washington from 1790 to 1797, and John Adams, from 1797 to 1800.

The President's House in Philadelphia (1794)

This house, located on the 500 block of Market Street, served as the executive mansion of the United…

The Villa Farnese, also known as Palazzo Farnese or Villa Caprarola, is a mansion in the town of Caprarola in the province of Viterbo, Northern Lazio, Italy, approximately 50 kilometres (35 miles) north-west of Rome.The Villa Farnese is a massive Renaissance construction begun in the early 1520s by Antonio da Sangallo, opening to the Monte Cimini, a range of densely wooded volcanic hills. It has a five-sided plant, and is built in reddish gold stone; buttresses support the piano nobile above, with two floors above again housing an almost complete two-story villa in itself. As a centerpiece of the vast Farnese holdings, it has always been more than a villa in the ordinary agricultural or pleasure senses."Another school, which displays a still stricter imitation of classical forms than that of which Bramante was the founder, was represented and advocated by Giacomo Barozzio, who is known under the name of Vignola (1507- 1573). This architect, by his works and his great influence on his contemporaries and successors, and the effect of his example is, like Palladio's, to be traced not only in the architectural bias of his own times, but also in the course of history of the eighteenth century. This result was principally brought about by means of his book on the five columnar orders of antiquity, and this treatise has been regarded as an authority down to the latest times. His most noteworthy construction is the Castle of Caprarola, between Rome and Viterbo."

Farnese Palace at Rome

The Villa Farnese, also known as Palazzo Farnese or Villa Caprarola, is a mansion in the town of Caprarola…

An image of one of the oldest homes located in St. Louis, Missouri in 1874.

Shack

An image of one of the oldest homes located in St. Louis, Missouri in 1874.

Originally, it was an 86,000-acre (350 km²) tract granted as a Patent to Stephanus Van Cortlandt in 1697 by King William III. The manor house was built sometime before 1732 but was not any owner's principal residence until a grandson, Pierre Van Cortlandt, moved there in 1749. At that time the manor house was on a thousand-acre portion of the original tract. The house remained in Van Cortlandt family ownership until 1945. In 1953, John D. Rockefeller purchased it and began a restoration. The restored manor house was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1961.

Van Cortlandt Manor House

Originally, it was an 86,000-acre (350 km²) tract granted as a Patent to Stephanus Van Cortlandt…

Jacques Phillippe Villeré (April 28, 1761 - 7 March 1830) was the second Governor of Louisiana after it became a state. Pictured is his home in New Orleans.

Villere's mansion

Jacques Phillippe Villeré (April 28, 1761 - 7 March 1830) was the second Governor of Louisiana…

Wollaton Hall is a country house standing on a small but prominent hill in Wollaton, Nottingham, England. Wollaton Park is the area of parkland that the stately house stands in. The house itself is a natural history museum, with other museums in the out-buildings. The surrounding land is regularly used for large scale outdoor events such as rock concerts and festivals."It is especially this vitiated taste in form and details which characterized the Elizabethan Renaissance [shown here]. The usual Roccoco Renaissance forms also occur in it, as, for instance, the quadrant-shaped gables curving alternately inwards and outwards, as also pilasters and columns intersected by quoins and bands; and various grotesque and debased forms. Enriched quoins are also freely used at angles and jambs."

Wollaton Hall

Wollaton Hall is a country house standing on a small but prominent hill in Wollaton, Nottingham, England.…