"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

"Man walking dogs in the 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Man walking dogs

"Man walking dogs in the 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened…