The barometer is used to measure atmospheric pressure.

Barometer

The barometer is used to measure atmospheric pressure.

"This is an instrument shaped something like a small clock, and the barometric pressure is read by means of a hand or indicator, on a scale of inches placed on the face like the minute divisions of a clock." — Waldo, 1896

Aneroid Barometer

"This is an instrument shaped something like a small clock, and the barometric pressure is read by means…

An instrument used to measure the quantity of a rain which falls at a given place. They are which falls at a given place. They are variously constructed. A convenient form (shown in figure) consists of a cylindrical tube of copper, with a funnel at the top where the rain enters. Connected with the cylinder at the lowest part is a glass tube with an attached scale.

Rain Gauge

An instrument used to measure the quantity of a rain which falls at a given place. They are which falls…

"Hair hygrometer." — Waldo, 1896

Hair hygrometer

"Hair hygrometer." — Waldo, 1896

These zones, which are separated by the parallels of latitude, are generally termed the <em>astronomical</em> or <em>mathematical zones</em> to distinguish them from others called <em>physical zones</em>, which are bounded by the lines of mean annual temperature.

Mathematical Climate Zones

These zones, which are separated by the parallels of latitude, are generally termed the astronomical

Abbe's Marine Nephoscope for observing direction and motion of a cloud. The horizontal mirror reflects the sky, matching the cloud's motion.

Abbe's Marine Nephoscope Horizontal Compass Projection

Abbe's Marine Nephoscope for observing direction and motion of a cloud. The horizontal mirror reflects…

Abbe's Marine Nephoscope for observing direction and motion of a cloud using a compass. The compass measures the direction of the cloud moving, while the center metal reflects the sky.

Abbe's Marine Nephoscope Horizontal Mirror Projection

Abbe's Marine Nephoscope for observing direction and motion of a cloud using a compass. The compass…

The inside view of Abbe's Marine Nephoscope used to measure the cloud's direction and velocity on a boat. The rounded middle part of the nephoscope is the mirror with the compass is along the circumfrance.

Abbe's Marine Nephoscope Inside View

The inside view of Abbe's Marine Nephoscope used to measure the cloud's direction and velocity on a…

Marvin's Nephoscope to measure direction and velocity of the cloud. This nephoscope is used on land, and made out of a mirror with a string attached to the scale.

Marvin's Nephoscope

Marvin's Nephoscope to measure direction and velocity of the cloud. This nephoscope is used on land,…

"In meteorology, a subsidiary cyclonic circulation, generally on the border of a primary cyclone accompanied by rain, thunder-storms, and squalls: indicated on a weather-map by the bulging of a sea-level isobar toward the region of higher pressure." -Whitney, 1911

Secondary

"In meteorology, a subsidiary cyclonic circulation, generally on the border of a primary cyclone accompanied…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere. These crystals arise from the congelation of the minute vesicles which constitute the clouds, when the temperature of the latter is below zero. They are more regular when formed in a calm atmosphere. Their form may be investigated by collecting them on a black surface, and viewing them through a strong lens. The regularity, and at the same time variety, of their forms, are truly beautiful."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Snow Crystals

"Snow is water solidified in stellate crystals, variously modified, and floating in the atmosphere.…

"The warmer current ascends, as indicated by the small arrows, and curls at the black wreath (u) of cloud, and then the commingling of the two currents forms an imposing dark dome (v) of cloud, from which heavy rain (r) or hail descends. The light grayish cloud which is seen behind the black wreath is the rain descending from the dark dome. The heavy raindrops bring down a large quantity of cold air, which flies straight out in advance of the storm, and produces the squall (q) indicated by the long arrow."&mdash;Finley, 1917

Line squall

"The warmer current ascends, as indicated by the small arrows, and curls at the black wreath (u) of…

"Thermometer bulb and stem." &mdash; Waldo, 1896

Thermometer

"Thermometer bulb and stem." — Waldo, 1896

"Mercurial thermometer." &mdash; Waldo, 1896

Mercurial thermometer

"Mercurial thermometer." — Waldo, 1896