Des Moines is the state capitol of Minnesota.

Des Moines, State Capitol

Des Moines is the state capitol of Minnesota.

John Ireland (September 11, 1838 – September 25, 1918) was the third bishop and first archbishop of Saint Paul, Minnesota.

Archbishop John Ireland

John Ireland (September 11, 1838 – September 25, 1918) was the third bishop and first archbishop of…

The official seal of the U.S. state of Minnesota in 1889.

Minnesota

The official seal of the U.S. state of Minnesota in 1889.

The United States seal of Minnesota with Native American warriors in the background.

Minnesota

The United States seal of Minnesota with Native American warriors in the background.

The state banner of Minnesota, the north star state.

Minnesota

The state banner of Minnesota, the north star state.

Seal of the state of Minnesota, 1876

Minnesota seal

Seal of the state of Minnesota, 1876

Seal of the state of Minnesota, 1876

Minnesota seal

Seal of the state of Minnesota, 1876

The official seal of the U.S. state of Minnesota.

Seal of Minnesota

The official seal of the U.S. state of Minnesota.

The official seal of the U.S. state of Missouri in 1889.

Missouri

The official seal of the U.S. state of Missouri in 1889.

(1815-1903) U.S. Senator and Governor of Minnesota. He also served as Secretary of War under President Hayes.

Alexander Ramsey

(1815-1903) U.S. Senator and Governor of Minnesota. He also served as Secretary of War under President…

"Second naval battle in Hampton Roads- fight between the Federal ironclad <em>Monitor</em>, of two guns, and the Confederate iron-plated steamers <em>Merrimac, Yorktown</em>, and <em>Jamestown</em>, carrying twenty-four guns, March 9th, 1862. But the gloom that had begun to settle on the fort was greatly dispelled when, toward midnight, an iron marine monster, unlike anything that had ever before been seen on the ocean, made its appearance off the forts. It proved to be the Ericsson iron floating battery of two guns, just from new York. The state of affairs was hastily explained to her commander, and she steamed off to the rescue of the deserted <em>Minnesota</em>. When day dawned the Confederate flotilla, flushed with the success of the previous day, bored down on what was supposed to be an easy prey. the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> drawing least water (The <em>Merrimac</em> evidently afraid of grounding) were ahead, when their course was suddenly stopped by the strange craft, which seemed to have dropped from the clouds. They thought to overcome her easily, and opened fire confidently; but a few of the heavy shot of the <em>Monitor</em>, which battered through and through their iron sides, drove them back in panic behind the gigantic <em>Merrimac</em>, against which the <em>Monitor</em> advanced in turn. And then commenced the most extraordinary naval contest known to history- the first battle between ironclad steamers every fought, and one in which all the appliances of modern skill were brought in conflict. The fight lasted for nearly five hours, when the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> fled up the James River, and the <em>Merrimac</em>, disabled, and in a sinking condition, retreated into Norfolk. The <em>Minnesota</em>, having grounded, was then got off, and the <em>Mintor</em>, a proud proof of the designer's genius and skill, rode undisputed monarch of Hampton waters." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Second naval battle

"Second naval battle in Hampton Roads- fight between the Federal ironclad Monitor, of two guns,…