Dredging, the excavating or scooping out of soil, mud, sand or rock under water by a machine called a dredge. Dredging is used in deepening and widening the beds of rivers, canals, harbors. The forms of modern dredges are very numerous, different conditions requiring different forms.

Dredge

Dredging, the excavating or scooping out of soil, mud, sand or rock under water by a machine called…

A series of footprints in the mud.

Footprints

A series of footprints in the mud.

Used in combination with the vehicle fender to protect vehicle passengers, other vehicles, and pedestrians from mud and other flying debris thrown into the air by the rotating tire.

Mud Guard

Used in combination with the vehicle fender to protect vehicle passengers, other vehicles, and pedestrians…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

The typical representation of shores and low-water lines with mud on a topographical map.

Mud

The typical representation of shores and low-water lines with mud on a topographical map.

Averaging six inches in length, the mud-tortoise is evenly distributed throughout the United States.

Mud-tortoise

Averaging six inches in length, the mud-tortoise is evenly distributed throughout the United States.

Section to show normal progressive overlap of the formations and their shoreward change from muds to sands and pebbles.

Progressive Overlap

Section to show normal progressive overlap of the formations and their shoreward change from muds to…

"These two boys have just been let out of school, and are returning home. Their father's house is seen in the distance on the right, and between it and the school-house there is a large tract of marshy and miry ground. The elder brother shows his wisdom in going round in the old beaten path. But the younger brother, in his eagerness to get home first, takes a shorter cut across the marsh. He takes a pole with him in order to leap across the ditches he may find in his way. In leaping across one of them the pole breaks, he falls into the ditch, and is mired nearly up to his neck in mud. It is unnecessary to state which boy got home first, or who made the best appearance after they got home."—Barber, 1857

The Longest Way Round, is the Shortest Way Home

"These two boys have just been let out of school, and are returning home. Their father's house is seen…

A cartoon of a young girl falling in a pile of mud.

Young Girl in Mud

A cartoon of a young girl falling in a pile of mud.