Clisthenes, also known as the Father of Athenian democracy, is depicted competing in a chariot race in the Olympic games.

Clisthenes in the Olympic Games

Clisthenes, also known as the Father of Athenian democracy, is depicted competing in a chariot race…

"A circular plate of stone or metal, made for throwing to a distance as in exercise of strength and dexterity. It was one of the principal gymnastic exercises of the ancients, being included in the Penthathlum. The preceding woodcut represents a player with the discus, and is copied from an ancient statue by Myron." — Smith, 1873.

Discus

"A circular plate of stone or metal, made for throwing to a distance as in exercise of strength and…

This is an illustration of a baseball game. Baseball is played on a large field that has four bases laid out in a square, positioned like a diamond, whose outlines mark the course a runner must take to score. Teams alternate positions as batters and fielders, exchanging places when three members of the batting team are put out. Batters try to hit a pitched ball out of reach of the fielding team and complete a circuit around the bases in order to score a run.

Baseball Game Illustration

This is an illustration of a baseball game. Baseball is played on a large field that has four bases…

"An athletic game, in which all the powers of the fighter were called into action. The pancratium was one of the games or gymnastic contests which were exhibited at all the great festivals of Greece; it consisted of boxing and wrestling, and was reckoned to be one of the heavy or hard exercises, on account of the violent exertions it required, and for this reason it was not much practised in the gymnasia. In Homer we find neither the game nor the name of the pancratium mentioned, and as it was not introduced at the Olympic games until Ol. 33, we may presume that the game, though it may have existed long before in a rude state, was not brought to any degree of perfection until a short time before that event. The name of the combatants was Pancratiastae, or Pammachi. They fought naked, and had their bodies anointed and covered with sand, by which they were enabled to take hold of one another. When the contest began, each of the fighters might commence by boxing or by wrestling, accordingly as he thought he should be more successful in the one than in the other. The victory was not decided until one of the parties was killed, or lifted up a finger, thereby declaring that he was unable to continue the contest either from pain or fatigue." — Smith, 1873

Pancratium

"An athletic game, in which all the powers of the fighter were called into action. The pancratium was…

"A Greek measure of length, and the chief one used for itinerary distances. It was equal to 600 Greek or 625 Roman feet, or to 125 Roman paces; and the roman mile contained 8 stadia. Hence the stadiura contained 600 feet 9 inches English. This standard prvailed throughout Greece, under the name of the Olympic stadium, so called because it was the exact length of the stadium or footrace course at Olympia, measured between the pillars at the two extremities of the course. The first use of the measure seems to be contemporaneous with the formation of the stadium at Olympia when the Olympic games were revived by Iphitus." — Smith, 1873

Stadium

"A Greek measure of length, and the chief one used for itinerary distances. It was equal to 600 Greek…

One of the Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece. They were held both the year before and the year after the Olympic Games.

The Isthmian Games

One of the Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece. They were held both the year before and the year after…