The Cistercian Abbey of St Mary and St Chad was founded in 1135 by Roger de Clinton, Bishop of Coventry (1129–1148). The abbey's location near the border of Wales meant it was destined to have a turbulent history. The abbey was closed in 1536 by the order of Henry VIII during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, whereupon the estate was granted to Lord Powis.

Buildwas Abbey (Cistercian)

The Cistercian Abbey of St Mary and St Chad was founded in 1135 by Roger de Clinton, Bishop of Coventry…

After the Norman conquest in 1066, Lanfranc (1070-1077) became the first Norman archbishop. He thoroughly rebuilt the ruined Saxon cathedral in a Norman design based strong on the Abbey of St. Etienne in Caen, of which he had previously been abbot. The new cathedral was dedicated in 1077.

Norman Door, Canterbury Cathedral

After the Norman conquest in 1066, Lanfranc (1070-1077) became the first Norman archbishop. He thoroughly…

It was begun during the reign of King Henry I by the first Bishop of Carlisle, the Englishman Athelwold (1133-1155), who built a moderate-sized Norman minster of which the transepts and part of the nave still exist. The present cathedral has fine examples of stone tracery, mediæval stained glass, paintings and carvings. The building is made of red sandstone, which due to local weather at some places appears black.

Carlisle Cathedral

It was begun during the reign of King Henry I by the first Bishop of Carlisle, the Englishman Athelwold…

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one of the finest examples of a Norman cathedral in Europe and has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site along with nearby Durham Castle, which faces it across Palace Green, high above the River Wear.

Durham Cathedral

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one…

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one of the finest examples of a Norman cathedral in Europe and has been designated a <abbr title="United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization">UNESCO</abbr> World Heritage Site along with nearby Durham Castle, which faces it across Palace Green, high above the River Wear.

Durham Cathedral from the Wear

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one…

Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal church of the diocese of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, England, and the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Ely. It is known locally as "the ship of the Fens", because of its prominent shape that towers above the surrounding flat and watery landscape.

Ely Cathedral

Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal…

Sanctuary was also a right to be safe from arrest in the sanctuary of a church or temple, recognized by English law from the fourth to the seventeenth century.

Fugitive Claiming Sanctuary

Sanctuary was also a right to be safe from arrest in the sanctuary of a church or temple, recognized…

Greensted Church, in the small village of Greensted, near Chipping Ongar in Essex, England, is the oldest wooden church in the world, and probably the oldest wooden building in Europe still standing, albeit only in part, since few sections of its original wooden structure remain. The oak palisade walls are often classified as remnants of a palisade church or a kind of early stave church, dated either to the mid-9th or mid-11th century.

Greenstead Church

Greensted Church, in the small village of Greensted, near Chipping Ongar in Essex, England, is the oldest…

It was the tallest building in the world for over 200 years (1300-1549), but the central spire collapsed in the sixteenth century and was not rebuilt. William the Conqueror ordered the first cathedral to be built in Lincoln, in 1072.

Lincoln Cathedral

It was the tallest building in the world for over 200 years (1300-1549), but the central spire collapsed…

Old St. Paul's is a name used to refer to the Gothic cathedral in the City of London built between 1087 and 1314. At its peak, the cathedral was the third longest church in Europe and had one of the tallest spires. The cathedral was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666, and the current domed St. Paul's Cathedral &mdash; in an English Baroque style &mdash; was subsequently erected on the site by Sir Christopher Wren.

Chapter House of Old St. Paul's

Old St. Paul's is a name used to refer to the Gothic cathedral in the City of London built between 1087…

The monastic community was founded by Saint David, Abbot of Menevia, who died in AD589. Between AD645 and 1097, the community was attacked many times by raiders, including the Vikings, however it was of such note as both a religious and intellectual centre that King Alfred summoned help from the monastic community at St David's in rebuilding the intellectual life of the Kingdom of Wessex.

St. David's Cathedral

The monastic community was founded by Saint David, Abbot of Menevia, who died in AD589. Between AD645…

The original Saxon church on the site was dedicated to St. Edmund the King and Martyr. During the Crusades in the 12th century the church was renamed St. Edmund and the Holy Sepulchre, in reference to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. The name eventually became contracted to St Sepulchre.

St. Sepulchre's, Cambridge

The original Saxon church on the site was dedicated to St. Edmund the King and Martyr. During the Crusades…

Tintern Abbey was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on May 9, 1131. Situated on the River Wye in Monmouthshire, it was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. The present-day remains of Tintern are a mixture of building works covering a 400-year period between 1136 and 1536. Very little remains of the first buildings; a few sections of walling are incorporated into later buildings and the two recessed cupboards for books on the east of the cloisters are from this period.

Tintern Abbey, Cisternian

Tintern Abbey was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on May 9, 1131. Situated on the River…

The transept is the area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building in Romanesque and Gothic Christian church architecture.

Transept of the Martyrdom

The transept is the area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building in Romanesque…