Carpenters' Hall is a four-story brick building in Center City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania which played a significant part in the early history of the United States.

Carpenter's Hall

Carpenters' Hall is a four-story brick building in Center City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania which played…

Carpenters' Hall is a four-story brick building in Center City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania which played a significant part in the early history of the United States.

Carpenters' Hall

Carpenters' Hall is a four-story brick building in Center City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania which played…

Carpenters' Hall is located in Center City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, most remembered as the site of the house in which the first congresses were held.

Carpenters' Hall

Carpenters' Hall is located in Center City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, most remembered as the site…

"Stuart's Confederate Cavalry, after their successful raid into Pennsylvania, escaping with their stolen horses into virginia by the lower fords of the Potomac, Sunday, October 12th 1862." —Leslie, 1896

Stuart's Cavalry

"Stuart's Confederate Cavalry, after their successful raid into Pennsylvania, escaping with their stolen…

An illustration of the ruins of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Chambersburg

An illustration of the ruins of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Benjamin Chew (November 19, 1722 - January 20, 1810) was a lawyer, politician and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Province of Pennsylvania. Pictured here is the residence of Justice Chew.

Chew's house

Benjamin Chew (November 19, 1722 - January 20, 1810) was a lawyer, politician and Chief Justice of the…

A scene in the coal mining region of Pennsylvania.

Coal Mining

A scene in the coal mining region of Pennsylvania.

(1817-1865) Governor of Pennsylvania and supporter of Lincoln's war efforts.

Andrew G. Curtin

(1817-1865) Governor of Pennsylvania and supporter of Lincoln's war efforts.

Fort Duquesne (originally called Fort Du Quesne) was a fort established by the French in 1754, at the junction of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers in what is now downtown Pittsburgh in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It was destroyed and replaced by Fort Pitt in 1758; over two centuries later, the site formerly occupied by Fort Duquesne is now Point State Park.

Fort Duquesne

Fort Duquesne (originally called Fort Du Quesne) was a fort established by the French in 1754, at the…

View of Fort Duquesne in the distance

Fort Duquesne

View of Fort Duquesne in the distance

The blockhouse and soldiers at Fort Pitt in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Fort Pitt

The blockhouse and soldiers at Fort Pitt in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

"Fossil Plant from Coal Measures of Pennsylvania."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Fossil Plant

"Fossil Plant from Coal Measures of Pennsylvania."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

(1706-1790) US diplomat, inventor, politician, and printer

Dr. Benjamin Franklin

(1706-1790) US diplomat, inventor, politician, and printer

The birthplace of Robert Fulton, inventor and engineer, in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

Fulton's Birthplace

The birthplace of Robert Fulton, inventor and engineer, in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

An illustration of William Penn's House.

William Penn's House

An illustration of William Penn's House.

Salt lick hydraulic-fill dam, Pennsylvania.

Hydraulic-fill Dam

Salt lick hydraulic-fill dam, Pennsylvania.

First Governor of Pennsylvania

Thomas Mifflin

First Governor of Pennsylvania

First Governor of Pennsylvania

Thomas Mifflin

First Governor of Pennsylvania

Penn's Treaty with the Native Americans under the Elm Tree at Shackamaxon

Penn's Treaty with the Native Americans under the Elm Tree at Shackamaxon

Penn's Treaty with the Native Americans under the Elm Tree at Shackamaxon

(1644-1718) Founder of Pennsylvania

William Penn

(1644-1718) Founder of Pennsylvania

(1644-1718) Founder of Pennsylvania

William Penn

(1644-1718) Founder of Pennsylvania

(1644-1718) Founder of Pennsylvania

William Penn

(1644-1718) Founder of Pennsylvania

(1644-1718) Founder of Pennsylvania

William Penn

(1644-1718) Founder of Pennsylvania

William Penn as a young man

William Penn

William Penn as a young man

William Penn thinks it wrong to take off his hat to his father

William Penn

William Penn thinks it wrong to take off his hat to his father

(1644-1718) Founder of the Province of Pennsylvania

William Penn

(1644-1718) Founder of the Province of Pennsylvania

Founder of the Province of Pennsylvania in 1677. He was born in 1644 and died in 1718.

William Penn

Founder of the Province of Pennsylvania in 1677. He was born in 1644 and died in 1718.

William Penn (October 14, 1644 – July 30, 1718) was founder and "Absolute Proprietor" of the Province of Pennsylvania, the English North American colony and the future U.S. state of Pennsylvania.

William Penn

William Penn (October 14, 1644 – July 30, 1718) was founder and "Absolute Proprietor" of the Province…

(1644-1718) William Penn was an English colonist and best known as founder of Pennsylvania.

William Penn

(1644-1718) William Penn was an English colonist and best known as founder of Pennsylvania.

William Penn (October 14, 1644 – July 30, 1718) was founder and "Absolute Proprietor" of the Province of Pennsylvania, the English North American colony and the future U.S. state of Pennsylvania. He was known as an early champion of democracy and religious freedom and famous for his good relations and his treaties with the Lenape Indians. Under his direction, Philadelphia was planned and developed.

William Penn

William Penn (October 14, 1644 – July 30, 1718) was founder and "Absolute Proprietor" of the Province…

An English entrepreneur who founded the Province of Pennsylvania in colonial America.

William Penn

An English entrepreneur who founded the Province of Pennsylvania in colonial America.

William Penn landed at Philadelphia in 1682.

Landing of William Penn at Philadelphia

William Penn landed at Philadelphia in 1682.

The official seal of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania in 1889.

Pennsylvania

The official seal of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania in 1889.

The United States seal of Pennsylvania with a ship in the background.

Pennsylvania

The United States seal of Pennsylvania with a ship in the background.

The state banner of Pennsylvania, the keystone state.

Pennsylvania

The state banner of Pennsylvania, the keystone state.

Seal of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1875

Pennsylvania seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1875

Seal of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1876

Pennsylvania seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1876

Seal of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1890

Pennsylvania seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1890

Seal of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1904

Pennsylvania seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1904

Philadelphia Exhibition in 1876.

Philadelphia Exhibition

Philadelphia Exhibition in 1876.

The costume of a Quaker

Quaker

The costume of a Quaker

The Quakers of Pennsylvania.

Quakers

The Quakers of Pennsylvania.

Carpenters' Hall is a four-story brick building in Center City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania which played a significant part in the early history of the United States.

Room in which Congress met in Carpenters' Hall

Carpenters' Hall is a four-story brick building in Center City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania which played…

An illustration of the treaty between the Native Americans and William Penn.

William Penn's Treaty with the Native Americans

An illustration of the treaty between the Native Americans and William Penn.

David Rittenhouse erected a temporary observatory for the purpose of observing the transit of Venus on the Walnut Street front of the State house in Philadelphia.

Walnut Street Front

David Rittenhouse erected a temporary observatory for the purpose of observing the transit of Venus…