"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"Bombardment of Island No. 10 and the fortifications opposite, on the Kentucky Shore, by the Federal mortar boats and gunboats, March 17th, 1862. From a sketch by our special artist Mr. H. Lovie, on board the gunboat "Conestoga." On the 16th of March, 1862, the mortar fleet and the gunboats, consisting of the <em>Cincinnati, Pittsburg, St. Louis, Silver Wave, Carondelet, Mount City, Conestoga, Louisville, Rob Roy, Alps, Wilson, Lake Erie, Great Western</em> and <em>Torrence</em>, and nine mortar boats, arrived near the Point. These were accompanied by several tugboats. On the same day they opened fire, which, after some hours' delay, was returned by the Confederate batteries. This continued for several days, with very small loss to the Federal side, owing to the iron casing of the vessels engaged, and a superior range." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Island No. 10

"Bombardment of Island No. 10 and the fortifications opposite, on the Kentucky Shore, by the Federal…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Battle of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing, left wing- the woods on fire during the engagement of Sunday, April 6th, 1862- Forty-Fourth Indiana Volunteers engaged. The right wing of General Hurlbut's division stopped the advance of the Confederates by a determined defense along a side road leading through the woods on the right of the field. The Twenty-fifth and Seventeenth Kentucky and Forty-fourth and Thirty-first Indiana Regiments were engaged. By some means the dry leaves and thick underbrush which covered this locality took fire, filling the woods with volumes of smoke, and only discovering the position of the opposing forces to each other by the unceasing rattle of musketry and the whizzing of the bullets." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Shiloh

"Battle of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing, left wing- the woods on fire during the engagement of Sunday,…

"Battle of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing, left wing- the woods on fire during the engagement of Sunday, April 6th, 1862- Forty-Fourth Indiana Volunteers engaged. The right wing of General Hurlbut's division stopped the advance of the Confederates by a determined defense along a side road leading through the woods on the right of the field. The Twenty-fifth and Seventeenth Kentucky and Forty-fourth and Thirty-first Indiana Regiments were engaged. By some means the dry leaves and thick underbrush which covered this locality took fire, filling the woods with volumes of smoke, and only discovering the position of the opposing forces to each other by the unceasing rattle of musketry and the whizzing of the bullets." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Shiloh

"Battle of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing, left wing- the woods on fire during the engagement of Sunday,…

"Battle of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing, left wing- the woods on fire during the engagement of Sunday, April 6th, 1862- Forty-Fourth Indiana Volunteers engaged. The right wing of General Hurlbut's division stopped the advance of the Confederates by a determined defense along a side road leading through the woods on the right of the field. The Twenty-fifth and Seventeenth Kentucky and Forty-fourth and Thirty-first Indiana Regiments were engaged. By some means the dry leaves and thick underbrush which covered this locality took fire, filling the woods with volumes of smoke, and only discovering the position of the opposing forces to each other by the unceasing rattle of musketry and the whizzing of the bullets." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Shiloh

"Battle of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing, left wing- the woods on fire during the engagement of Sunday,…

"Siege of Island No. 10, on the Mississippi River- night bombardment by the Federal mortar boats, ten o'clock P. M., March 18th, 1862. On the 16th of March, 1862, the mortar fleet and the gunboats, consisting of the <em>Cincinnati, Pittsburg, St. Louis, Silver Wave, Carondelet, Mound City, Conestoga, Louisville, Rob Roy, Alps, Wilson, Lake Erie, Great Western</em> and <em>Torrence</em>, and nine mortar boats, arrived near the Point. These were accompanied by several tugboats. On the 18th they opened fire, which, after some hours' delay, was returned by the Confederate batteries. This continued for several days, with very little loss to the Federal troops, owing to the iron casing of the vessels. The study of mortar firing is very interesting. Our sketch represents the manner in which the smoke rolls, and a small column frequently splits out when the shell passes. The shell itself can be seen at night during its entire flight, the fuse having the appearance of a star, which appears and disappears as the shell rolls through the air, very like the twinkling of the celestial orbs. The explosion of the shell at night is a magnificent and fearful sight, sending a glow of surpassing brightness around it as though some world of combustible light had burst." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Island

"Siege of Island No. 10, on the Mississippi River- night bombardment by the Federal mortar boats, ten…