"Camp Dennison, sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on the banks of the Miami River, General Cox commanding- the Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus Railroad passed directly through the camp grounds. This camp, which was organized for a camp of instruction and drill, was situated about sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on a field of seventy-five acres, on the banks of the Miami River, surrounded by high bluffs. The Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus Railroad passed directly through the grounds, and this road was guarded for miles by sentries in order to watch bridges, telegraph wires and culverts, as spies were infesting the whole country. There were 18,000 men in camp, including the splendid Kentucky Regiment of Guthrie Grays, and quarters were erected for 20,000 men, who were soon on the ground. The tents were rough-board shanties, but were comfortable, and the officers had marquees erected in the rear of the regimental quarters. This brigade was under the command of General Cox, a West Point officer, and under the immediate supvervision of General George B. McClellan. It was in a beautiful location, and the troops were kept under a very strict surveillance, there being but few spectators allowed to visit the ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Camp Dennison

"Camp Dennison, sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on the banks of the Miami River, General Cox commanding-…

A carriage for running on the rails of a railway.

Car

A carriage for running on the rails of a railway.

The first train of cars.

Cars

The first train of cars.

Old fashioned railroad coach use for transporting few passangers.

Railway Coach

Old fashioned railroad coach use for transporting few passangers.

Baldwin engine

Baldwin engine

Baldwin engine

"In railway engineering, the running together of parallel tracks into the space occupied by one, by crossing the two inner rails so as to bring each side by side with the opposite outer rail." -Whitney, 1911

Gauntlet Track

"In railway engineering, the running together of parallel tracks into the space occupied by one, by…

(1856--) General manager of the Grand Trunk Railway, and became vice-president

Charles M. Hays

(1856--) General manager of the Grand Trunk Railway, and became vice-president

(1838-1916) Railroad executive and financier that was known as "Hill the empire builder" because of his contribution to developing the Northwest.

James Jerome Hill

(1838-1916) Railroad executive and financier that was known as "Hill the empire builder" because of…

A diagram of a cross-section of a power station at the South Side Elevated Railway Company in Chicago. This picture is a good analogy for a modern power house of comparative capacity.

Power House

A diagram of a cross-section of a power station at the South Side Elevated Railway Company in Chicago.…

President or manager of several railroad companies.

James W. Hyatt

President or manager of several railroad companies.

"Scene on the James River, at Richmond. This view is from a long shaded island extending up the river from Mayo's Bridge, one of the three structures which span the stream at Richmond. Down the river from our point of view is seen Mayo's Bridge, and, in the extreme distance, the lower portion of Richmond, upon Richmond or Church Hill. Several fish-traps are seen among the rapids in the river. On the left are observed two or three smaller islands. Since the boave sketch was made, a bridge, for the accommodation of the Danville rail-way, has been constructed from the Richmond end of Mayo's Bridge, diagonally, to the southern end of the Petersburgh rail-way bridge, crossing very nearly our point of view. Not content with thus marring the beauty of one of the finest series of islands and cascades in the country, the company have covered the bridge, so as to shut out from the eyes of passengers the surrounding attractions."—Lossing, 1851

James River

"Scene on the James River, at Richmond. This view is from a long shaded island extending up the river…

"Three locomotives were imported from England in 1829, and the first trial in America took place Aug. 8, 1829, at Honesdale, Pa. The first railway constructed to be worked by locomotives was the South Carolina railroad (1826–1830), though trials of an experimental locomotive had been made before on the Baltimaore and Ohio railroad, which continued to be worked by horsepower till 1832. "—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

American Locomotive

"Three locomotives were imported from England in 1829, and the first trial in America took place Aug.…

"Three locomotives were imported from England in 1829, and the first trial in America took place Aug. 8, 1829, at Honesdale, Pa. The first railway constructed to be worked by locomotives was the South Carolina railroad (1826–1830), though trials of an experimental locomotive had been made before on the Baltimaore and Ohio railroad, which continued to be worked by horsepower till 1832. "—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Early Locomotive

"Three locomotives were imported from England in 1829, and the first trial in America took place Aug.…

The Lucerne Railway Station in Switzerland.

Lucerne Railway Station

The Lucerne Railway Station in Switzerland.

Passenger Depot of the Chicago and North-Western Railroad, corner of Wells and Kinzie streets.

Passenger Depot

Passenger Depot of the Chicago and North-Western Railroad, corner of Wells and Kinzie streets.

"The first passenger locomotive built in the United States. A year after the Enterprise sailed for India, the first railroad in the United States was opened in Massachusetts, from the Quincy quarries to tide water. It was only two miles long, and was used for hauling granite; the cars were drawn by horses. It was the first use of rails in America. In 1830 the first passenger railway in America was opened. It extended westward from Baltimore about fifteen miles, and now forms a part of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The cars were at first drawn by horses, but a locomotive was used the next year. Its first locomotive was built by Peter Cooper, who made later the generous and useful gift of the Cooper Union to the city of New York. Now began the construction of railroads in various directions; in the next twenty years nearly ten thousand miles of road were built. This mileage has constantly been increased, until in 1895 there were in operation in the United States nearly one hundred and eighty thousand miles of railway."—Scudder, 1897

Passenger Train

"The first passenger locomotive built in the United States. A year after the Enterprise sailed for India,…

Telegraph and Railroad

Railroad

Telegraph and Railroad

A railroad train of the twentieth century.

A Railroad Train

A railroad train of the twentieth century.

An illustration of a group of men working on the railroad.

Railroad Workers

An illustration of a group of men working on the railroad.

"Industrial Railway. a, cast-iron plates bedded in concrete for boiler-room floor; b, section of boiler; c, cast-iron track; d, charging-car with outside-flange wheels." -Whitney, 1911

Industrial Railway

"Industrial Railway. a, cast-iron plates bedded in concrete for boiler-room floor; b, section of boiler;…

A suspension railway, Barmen, Germany.

Suspension Railway

A suspension railway, Barmen, Germany.

"Railway Semaphore. a, lever, which operates both b, blade, and c, lantern." -Whitney, 1911

Railroad Semaphore

"Railway Semaphore. a, lever, which operates both b, blade, and c, lantern." -Whitney, 1911

Making up rafts on the Susquehanna River. A scene on the line of the Erie Railroad.

Susquehanna River

Making up rafts on the Susquehanna River. A scene on the line of the Erie Railroad.

The Romanoff railway system, a single rail type.

Romanoff System

The Romanoff railway system, a single rail type.

Steaming locomotive on the railroad.

Train

Steaming locomotive on the railroad.

Early railroad train.

Train

Early railroad train.

A train is a connected series of vehicles that move along a track (permanent way) to transport freight or passengers from one place to another. The track usually consists of two rails.

Train

A train is a connected series of vehicles that move along a track (permanent way) to transport freight…

An illustration of a train accident.

Train Accident

An illustration of a train accident.

An illustration of a train station.

Train Station

An illustration of a train station.

The first railroad train to be used in America.

First Railroad Train

The first railroad train to be used in America.

"The big loop on the Georgetown branch of the Union Pacific, Colorado."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Union Pacific

"The big loop on the Georgetown branch of the Union Pacific, Colorado."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

"Cornelius Vanderbilt was involved in the New York Central Station."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Cornelius Vanderbilt

"Cornelius Vanderbilt was involved in the New York Central Station."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

"The war in Virginia- railroad bridge over the Rappahannock, at Rappahannock Station."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Virginia

"The war in Virginia- railroad bridge over the Rappahannock, at Rappahannock Station."— Frank…

"The highest of the White Mountains is Mount Washington. We can go in an ordinary train to the foot of this mountain, and from there can ride to its summit over one of the oddest little railroads in the world. The mountain is more than a mile high, and this little railroad goes right up to its top. In some places the track is so steep that it looks more like a ladder than a railroad, and the cars which go up it are at times at such an angle that you would think they would slide to the bottom."—Carpenter, 1898

Railroad Up Mount Washington

"The highest of the White Mountains is Mount Washington. We can go in an ordinary train to the foot…