The Metz Cathedral is also known as the St. Etienne de Metz in French. It is a Roman Catholic church located in Moselle, France. The interior nave shown in this picture, is the center aisle that leads to the altar, it is the third highest in France.

Metz Cathedral

The Metz Cathedral is also known as the St. Etienne de Metz in French. It is a Roman Catholic church…

The cathedral of Chartres is a roman catholic cathedral in Chartres, France. Built in a Gothic style, the Cathedral has two different spires.

Cathedral of Chartres

The cathedral of Chartres is a roman catholic cathedral in Chartres, France. Built in a Gothic style,…

"Germany's most beautiful cathedral, Cologne." -Foster, 1921

Cologne Cathedral

"Germany's most beautiful cathedral, Cologne." -Foster, 1921

(1842-1917) American Roman Catholic cardinal born in Italy.

Diomede Falconio

(1842-1917) American Roman Catholic cardinal born in Italy.

(1842-1918) American Roman Catholic cardinal born in Ireland.

John Murphy Farley

(1842-1918) American Roman Catholic cardinal born in Ireland.

"Fenestella. In Roman Catholic churches, a niche on the south side of an altar, containing the piscina, and frequently also the credence." -Whitney, 1911

Fenestella in the Church of Norrey

"Fenestella. In Roman Catholic churches, a niche on the south side of an altar, containing the piscina,…

Edmund Grindal (c. 1519 – 6 July 1583) was an English church leader who successively held the posts of Bishop of London, Archbishop of York and Archbishop of Canterbury. In 1570 Grindal became Archbishop of York, where Puritans were few and coercion would be required mainly for Roman Catholics. His first letter from Cawood to Cecil told that he had not been well received, that the gentry were not "well-affected to godly religion and among the common people many superstitious practices remained."

Archbishop Edmund Grindal

Edmund Grindal (c. 1519 – 6 July 1583) was an English church leader who successively held the…

"In this city many individual tendencies are perceptible, but the predominant inclination is toward the Italian Renaissance . The new Opera-House, built by Van der Nüll and Siccardsburg, forms an exception to this rule, the design and forms of which were copied from the Early French Renaissance, with its narrow moulding and flat elliptical arches. On the other hand, the models of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries are chosen for churches built in the Gothic style. In its richest phase this is seen in the memorial church, built by Ferstel; and in its poorest aspect, and divested of all the ornamental details necessary to produce a good effect, in the Lazaristen Kirche, built by Schmidt, one of the most important representatives of the Gothic style, and at the same time an advocate in word and deed for its reintroduction."The Lazaristenkirche is a Roman Catholic church building in the 7th district of Vienna, Neubau.

Lazarist Church at Vienna

"In this city many individual tendencies are perceptible, but the predominant inclination is toward…

Pope Leo XIII (1810-1903). Archbishop, bishop, cardinal, chamberlain of the Sacred College, and Pope.

Leo XIII

Pope Leo XIII (1810-1903). Archbishop, bishop, cardinal, chamberlain of the Sacred College, and Pope.

"In England, as in Germany, architectural activity has assumed various phases in modern times. With few exceptions, the numerous newly-constructed churches are built in the Gothic style of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries; whilst public secular buildings, for which a certain simplicity is appropriate, such as school and university buildings, asylums, &c., as well as large country-houses, are either constructed in the Pointed or in the Late Gothic, or so-called Perpendicular or Tudor style, with flat-arched, curved, or even horizontal heads to the openings. Other public buildings, as, for instance, the Houses of Parliament, which is the most important modern building in London, are carried out in this style. The Renaissance style has recently been frequently employed, especially for dwelling-houses."The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament, is a complex of buildings in London. It is the seat of the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons). The palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the London borough of the City of Westminster, close to the government buildings of Whitehall.

New Houses of Parliament, London

"In England, as in Germany, architectural activity has assumed various phases in modern times. With…

St. Peter's and the Vatican, Rome, 1901

St. Peter's and the Vatican

St. Peter's and the Vatican, Rome, 1901

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became Dean of St. Paul's in 1664, greatly assisting with the rebuilding after the Great Fire of London, towards which he contributed £1400. In 1677, being now prolocutor of the Convocation, he was unexpectedly advanced to the archbishopric of Canterbury. He attended Charles II upon his deathbed, and "made to him a very weighty exhortation, in which he used a good degree of freedom." He crowned King James II in 1685.

Archbishop William Sancroft

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became…

"The Pastoral Staff is, in the Roman Catholic Church, the official staff of a bishop or abbot. The pastoral staff of an archbishop is distinguished by being surmounted by a crozier."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Pastoral Staff

"The Pastoral Staff is, in the Roman Catholic Church, the official staff of a bishop or abbot. The pastoral…

John Whitgift (c. 1530 – February 29, 1604) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted for his hospitality, he was somewhat ostentatious in his habits, sometimes visiting Canterbury and other towns attended by a retinue of 800 horsemen. Whitgift's theological views were often controversial.

Archbishop John Whitgift

John Whitgift (c. 1530 – February 29, 1604) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted…