All Saints Church in Wilden, Worcestershire about one mile to the north east of Stourport. It was designed by W J Hopkins with funds provided by Alfred Baldwin very close to his own home, Wilden House and one of his large iron works. It served the Baldwin family and their employees and was consecrated in 1880.

Church of All Saints, Wilden, Worcestershire

All Saints Church in Wilden, Worcestershire about one mile to the north east of Stourport. It was designed…

The Church of England parish church of St Michael was built in 1293, supposedly to replace a Saxon church at Water Oakley. It has a number of sculptures which may have come from th earlier church, including a damaged Sheela na Gig. It is best known to brass rubbers for housing the superb memorial brass of 1378 to Sir John Foxley, the Constable of Southampton Castle, and his two wives. One of the local cottages has a tunnel which it is believed leads to the church and served as an escape route for clergymen.

Bray Church, Near Maidenhead, Berks

The Church of England parish church of St Michael was built in 1293, supposedly to replace a Saxon church…

Choir Chapel, 14th century. Cathedral of Mantes, France.

Chapel

Choir Chapel, 14th century. Cathedral of Mantes, France.

Elstow Abbey was a monastery for Benedictine nuns in Bedfordshire, England. It was founded c.1075 by Judith, Countess of Huntingdon, a niece of William the Conqueror and therefore classed as a royal foundation. Following the dissolution, the majority of the church nave was blocked off and retained for parish use. The remainder of the church was demolished after 1580. In 1616 Sir Thomas Hillersdon purchased the remaining monastic buildings and incorporated them into a new house, which itself later became a ruin.

Elstow Church, Bedfordshire

Elstow Abbey was a monastery for Benedictine nuns in Bedfordshire, England. It was founded c.1075 by…

Sanctuary was also a right to be safe from arrest in the sanctuary of a church or temple, recognized by English law from the fourth to the seventeenth century.

Fugitive Claiming Sanctuary

Sanctuary was also a right to be safe from arrest in the sanctuary of a church or temple, recognized…

The cathedral consists of a Norman nucleus (Walter de Lacy is buried there), with additions in every style of Gothic architecture. It is 420 feet (130 m) long, and 144 feet (44 m) wide, with a beautiful central tower of the 15th century rising to the height of 225 ft (69 m). and topped by four graceful pinnacles, a famous landmark.

Gloucester Cathedral (Abbey) Church

The cathedral consists of a Norman nucleus (Walter de Lacy is buried there), with additions in every…

Ground plan of Edfou. I. Sanctuary; II. Hall of Columns; III. Great Hall of Columns; IV. Great Court; V. Pylons; VI. Outer Wall.

Ground Plan of Edfou

Ground plan of Edfou. I. Sanctuary; II. Hall of Columns; III. Great Hall of Columns; IV. Great Court;…

In the war between King and Parliament (the English Civil War) the city of Hereford fell into the hands first of one party, then of the other. Once it endured a siege, and when it was taken the conquerors ran riot in the cathedral and, in their fury, caused great damage which could never be repaired. In the early years of the 18th century, Bishop Bisse (1712-21), devised a scheme to support the central tower. He also had installed an enormous altar-piece and an oak screen, and instead of restoring the Chapter House he allowed its stones to be utilized for alterations to the Bishop's Palace.

Hereford Cathedral

In the war between King and Parliament (the English Civil War) the city of Hereford fell into the hands…

Kelso Abbey is a Scottish abbey built in the 12th century by a community of Tironensian monks who had moved from the nearby Selkirk Abbey. The monks constructed the Abbey on land granted to them by King David I. The construction commenced in 1128, and when completed fifteen years later, in 1143, it was dedicated to The Blessed Virgin and Saint John. The importance of the Abbey at that time was shown when King James III of Scotland was crowned at the Abbey in 1460. However, the Abbey's proximity to the border with England led to it suffering damage from cross-border raids. It was first damaged in the Anglo-Scottish wars at the start of the 1300s, but was later repaired by the monks.

Ruins of Kelso Abbey

Kelso Abbey is a Scottish abbey built in the 12th century by a community of Tironensian monks who had…

Magna Carta Island is an island in the River Thames in England, on the reach above Bell Weir Lock. It is in Berkshire (formerly Buckinghamshire) across the river from the water-meadows at Runnymede. The island is one of several contenders for being the place where, in 1215, King John sealed the Magna Carta. Whilst the charter itself indicates Runnymede by name, it is possible the island may have been considered part of Runnymede at the time. It is known that in 1217 the island was the meeting-place of Henry III and Louis (afterwards Louis VIII) of France.

Magna Charta Island

Magna Carta Island is an island in the River Thames in England, on the reach above Bell Weir Lock. It…

Manchester Cathedral is a Medieval church located on Victoria Street in central Manchester and is the seat of the Bishop of Manchester. Although constructed over a period of 600 years, its main architectural style is Perpendicular Gothic, replete with tall windows and flat fan-vaulted ceilings. The interior of the church contains many pieces of period art, notably the medieval woodcarvings of the Ripon Carvers.

Manchester Cathedral

Manchester Cathedral is a Medieval church located on Victoria Street in central Manchester and is the…

In 1522, the priory was surrendered to Cardinal Wolsey, having selected it as a site for his proposed college. However, in 1529 the foundation was taken over by King Henry VIII. Work stopped, but in June 1532 the college was refounded by the King. In 1546, Henry VIII transferred to it from Oseney to the see of Oxford. The cathedral has the name of Ecclesia Christi Cathedralis Oxoniensis, given to it by King Henry VIII's foundation charter.

Oxford Cathedral

In 1522, the priory was surrendered to Cardinal Wolsey, having selected it as a site for his proposed…

A prominent feature of the Edinburgh skyline, St. Giles' Cathedral or the High Kirk of Edinburgh is a Church of Scotland. The church has been one of Edinburgh's religious focal points for approximately 900 years. Today it is sometimes regarded as the mother church of Presbyterianism. St. Giles was only a cathedral in its formal sense (i.e. the seat of a bishop) for two periods during the 17th century (1635–38 and 1661–1689), when Episcopalianism, backed by the Crown, briefly gained ascendancy within the Kirk.

St. Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh

A prominent feature of the Edinburgh skyline, St. Giles' Cathedral or the High Kirk of Edinburgh is…

The Basilica of St. John Lateran (Italian: Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano) is the cathedral of the church of Rome and the official ecclesiastical seat of the Bishop of Rome, who is the Pope. As the cathedral of the Bishop of Rome, containing the papal throne (Cathedra Romana), it ranks above all other churches in the Roman Catholic Church, even above St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican.

St. John's Church, Lateran Palace, Rome

The Basilica of St. John Lateran (Italian: Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano) is the cathedral of…

Whitby Abbey is a ruined Benedictine abbey sited on Whitby's East Cliff in North Yorkshire on the northeast coast of England. It was founded in 657 AD by the Anglo-Saxon King of Northumbria, Oswy as Streoneshalh.

The Ruins of Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey is a ruined Benedictine abbey sited on Whitby's East Cliff in North Yorkshire on the northeast…