"Diagram of the arterial system of A, Scorpio, and B, Limulus. The Roman numerals indicate the body somites and the two figures are adjusted for comparison. ce, Cerebral arteries; sp, supra-spinal or medullary artery; c, caudal artery; l, lateral anastomotic artery of Limulus. The figure B also shows the peculiar neural investiture formed by the cerebral arteries in Limulus and the derivation from this of the arteries to the limbs, III, IV, VI, whereas in Scorpio the latter have a seperate origin from the anterior aorta." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Arterial System

"Diagram of the arterial system of A, Scorpio, and B, Limulus. The Roman numerals indicate the body…

Scene showing various animals of the Division <em>Articulata</em>.

Articulata

Scene showing various animals of the Division Articulata.

"Amoung the larger kinds of military weapons in use before the invention of gunpowder. The balista, the catapulta, the scorpion, and the onger, propelled large and heav missiles, chiefly through the reaction of a tightly-twisted rope of hemp, flax, catgut, sinew, or hair; or else by a violent movement of levers." &mdash; Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Ballista

"Amoung the larger kinds of military weapons in use before the invention of gunpowder. The balista,…

Scorpion constellation.

Scorpion

Scorpion constellation.

Scorpions are any arachnid of the order Scorpionida. Unlike the majority of arachnid species, scorpions are viviparous. The young are born one by one, and the brood is carried about on its mother's back until the young have undergone at least one moult. All known Scorpion species possess poison or venom. Scorpions use their venom to kill or paralyze their prey so that it can be eaten; in general it is fast-acting, allowing for effective prey capture.

Scorpion

Scorpions are any arachnid of the order Scorpionida. Unlike the majority of arachnid species, scorpions…

"Entosternum of scorpion (Palamnaeus indus, de Geer); dorsal surface. asp, Paired anterior process of the subneural arch. snp, Sub-neural arch. ap, Anterior lateral process. lmp, Lateral median process. pp, Posterior process. pf, Posterior flap or diaphragm of Newport. m1 and m2, Perforations of the diaphragm for the passage of muscles. DR, the paired dorsal ridges. GC, Gastric canal or foramen. AC, Arterial canal or foramen." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Entosternum

"Entosternum of scorpion (Palamnaeus indus, de Geer); dorsal surface. asp, Paired anterior process of…

"Third leg of Limulus polyphemus, showing the division of the fourth segment of the leg by a groove S into two, thus giving seven segments to the leg as in scorpion." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Limulus Polyphemus

"Third leg of Limulus polyphemus, showing the division of the fourth segment of the leg by a groove…

"Ventral view of a restoration of Palaeophonus Hunteri, Pocock, the Silurian scorpion from Lesmahagow, Scotland. Restored by R. I. Peacock. The meeting of the coxae of all the prosomatic limbs in front of the pentagonal sternum; the space for a genital operculum; the pair of pectens, and the absence of any evidence of pulmonary stigmata are noticeable in this specimen." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Palaeophonus Hunteri

"Ventral view of a restoration of Palaeophonus Hunteri, Pocock, the Silurian scorpion from Lesmahagow,…

"Dorsal view of a restoration of Palaeophonus nuncius, Thorell. The Silurian scorpion from Gothland." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Palaophonus

"Dorsal view of a restoration of Palaeophonus nuncius, Thorell. The Silurian scorpion from Gothland."…

"Comparison of the sixth prosomatic limb of a recent scorpion (B), of Palaeophonus (C), and of Limulus (A), showing their agreement in the number of segments; in the existence of a movable spine, Sp, at the distal border of the fifth segment; in the correspondence of the two claws at the free end of the limb of Scorpio with two spines similarly placed in Limulus; and, lastly, in the correspondence of the three talon-like spines carried on the distal margin of segment six of recent scorpions with the four larger but similarly situated spines of the leg of Limulus; s, groove dividing the ankylosed segments 4 and 5 of the Limulus leg into two." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Prosomatic Limb

"Comparison of the sixth prosomatic limb of a recent scorpion (B), of Palaeophonus (C), and of Limulus…

"Diagram of a retinula of the central eye of a scorpion consisting of five retina-cells (ret), with adherent branched pigment cells (pig)." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Retinula

"Diagram of a retinula of the central eye of a scorpion consisting of five retina-cells (ret), with…

"Rhabdom of the same, consisting of five confluent rhabdomeres." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Rhabdom

"Rhabdom of the same, consisting of five confluent rhabdomeres." — The Encyclopedia Britannica,…

"Transverse section of the rhabdom of a retinula of the scorpion's central eye, showing its five constituent rhabdomeres as rays of a star." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Rhabdom

"Transverse section of the rhabdom of a retinula of the scorpion's central eye, showing its five constituent…

Scorpions are found in warm climates, reaching their greatest size in tropical America and Africa.

Scorpion

Scorpions are found in warm climates, reaching their greatest size in tropical America and Africa.

Scorpions are characterized by having a distinctly segmented abdomen, which passes into the cephalothorax, without any well-marked line of boundary.

Scorpion

Scorpions are characterized by having a distinctly segmented abdomen, which passes into the cephalothorax,…

"This order, sometimes called the <em>Pedipalpi</em>, or <em>feet-feelers</em>, and which derives its name from the Greek <em>polus</em>, many <em>mera</em>, divisions, and <em>somata</em>, bodies, includes two families, the first of which is the <em>Scorpiondae</em>, characterized by their elongated tail-like abdomen, armed at its extremity with a sort of hooked claw, which, when the creatures are in motion, is always carried over the back in a most threatening attitude." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Scorpion

"This order, sometimes called the Pedipalpi, or feet-feelers, and which derives its…

The name of an extensive genus of insects, native to the warm climates of both hemispheres, and belonging to the same family as the spiders.

Scorpion

The name of an extensive genus of insects, native to the warm climates of both hemispheres, and belonging…

"Ventral view of a scorpion. Palamnaeus indus, de Geer, to show the arrangement of the coxae of the limbs, the sternal elements, genital plate and pectens. M, Mouth behind the oval median camerostome. I, The chelicerae. II, The chelae. III to VI, the four pairs of walking legs. VIIgo, The genital somite or first somite of the mesosoma with the genital operculum (a fused pair of limbs). VIIIp, the pectiniferous somite. IXstg to XIstg, the four pulmonary somites. met, the pentagonal metasternite of the prosoma behind all the coxae. x, the sternum of the pectiniferous somite. y, the broad first somite of the metasoma." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Scorpion

"Ventral view of a scorpion. Palamnaeus indus, de Geer, to show the arrangement of the coxae of the…

"View from below of a scorpion (Buthus occitanus) opened and dissected so as to show the pericardium with its muscles, the lateral arteries, and the tergo-sternal muscles. PRO, Prosoma. dpm, Dorso-plastral muscle. art, Lateral artery. tsm1, Tergo-sternal muscle of the second (pectiniferous) mesosomatic somite; this is the most anterior pair of the series of six, none are present in the genital somite. tsm4, Tergo-sternal muscle of the fifth mesosomatic somite. tsm6, Tergo-sternal muscle of the enlarged first metasomatic somite. Per, Pericardium. VPM1 to VPM7, The series of seven pairs of veno-pericardiac muscles. There is some reason to admit the existence of another more anterior pair of these muscles in Scorpio; this would make the number exactly correspond with the number in Limulus." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Scorpion

"View from below of a scorpion (Buthus occitanus) opened and dissected so as to show the pericardium…

"Diagram of a lateral view of a longitudinal section of a scorpion. d, Chelicera. ch, Chela. cam, Camerostome. m, Mouth. ent, Entosternum. p, Pecten. stig1, First pulmonary aperture. stig4, Fourth pulmonary aperture. dam, Muscle from carapace to a praeoral entosclerite. ad, Muscle from carapace to entosternum. md, Muscle from tergite of genital somite to entosternum. dv1 to dv6, Dorso-ventral muscles. pv1 to pv7, The seven veno-pericardiac muscles of the right side." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Scorpion

"Diagram of a lateral view of a longitudinal section of a scorpion. d, Chelicera. ch, Chela. cam, Camerostome.…

"Drawing from life of the desert scorpion, Buthusaustralis." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Scorpion

"Drawing from life of the desert scorpion, Buthusaustralis." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Drawing from tlife of the Italian scorpion Euscorpius italicus, Herbst, holding a blue-bottle fly with its left chela, and carefully piercing it between head and thorax with its string. Two insertions of the string are effected and the fly is instantly paralysed by the poison so introduced into its body." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Scorpion

"Drawing from tlife of the Italian scorpion Euscorpius italicus, Herbst, holding a blue-bottle fly with…

"The same scorpion carrying the now paralysed fly held in its chelicerae, the chelae liberated for attack and defence." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Scorpion

"The same scorpion carrying the now paralysed fly held in its chelicerae, the chelae liberated for attack…

"Development of the lateral eyes of a scorpion. h, Epidermic cell-layer; mes, mesoblastic connective tissue; n, nerves; II, III, IV, V, depressions of the epidermis in each of which a cuticular lens will be formed." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Scorpion Eyes

"Development of the lateral eyes of a scorpion. h, Epidermic cell-layer; mes, mesoblastic connective…

"The Furies are generally represented with a scourge, with which to punish the wicked in Tartarus. It probably was supposed to resemble the whip used for punishing slaves, which was a dreaedful instrument, knotted with bones or heavy indented circles of bronze, or terminated by hooks, in which latter case it was aptly denominated a scorpion." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Scourge

"The Furies are generally represented with a scourge, with which to punish the wicked in Tartarus. It…

"Is five to eight inches long; is very voracious, swims rapidly, and si found under stones and sea-weed along the European shores. They are often caught in trawl-nets, but are of no value, on account of their sharp spines they are carefully handled; common in European and American waters." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Sea Scorpion

"Is five to eight inches long; is very voracious, swims rapidly, and si found under stones and sea-weed…