(1778-1868) Lord Henry Peter Brougham, the first Baron Brougham and Vaux, was a British writer, scientist, lawyer, Whig politician and abolitionist. Brougham was responsible for passing the Reform Act of 1832 and the Slavery Abolition Act of 1833.

Lord Henry Brougham

(1778-1868) Lord Henry Peter Brougham, the first Baron Brougham and Vaux, was a British writer, scientist,…

John Brown's Fort (the engine house) from John Brown's Raid on Harpers Ferry. Brown led a group of 21 men in a raid on the Arsenal on October 16, 1859 in order to initiate a slave uprising throughout the South. The raid was unsuccessful but was a catalyst for the Civil War.

John Brown's Fort in Harpers Ferry

John Brown's Fort (the engine house) from John Brown's Raid on Harpers Ferry. Brown led a group of 21…

In 1859, John Brown collected a small body of men, white and black, in the mountains of Maryland. He made a sudden attack upon Harper's Ferry, where there was a United States arsenal, which he seized and held for a few hours. The attack was a direct assault upon slavery. Brown had resolved to carry the war into what he regarded as the enemy's country, and he expected to see the slaves flock to his standard. There were few at the North who knew of his purpose; and the country, North and South, was amazed at the act. John Brown was wounded and taken prisoner; some of his associates were killed, and some were taken with him. He was tried by the State of Virginia, sentenced, and hanged. His action was generally condemned by the people, but many declared him a martyr to freedom, and accused slavery of provoking him to the deed. His act, moreover, deepened the feeling of the South that the North was in a hostile attitiude; and public opinion at the South held the North responsible for Brown's movement."—Scudder, 1897

John Brown

In 1859, John Brown collected a small body of men, white and black, in the mountains of Maryland. He…

Militant American abolitionist, tried to forceably liberate the slaves, hung for treason.

John Brown

Militant American abolitionist, tried to forceably liberate the slaves, hung for treason.

John Brown (1800 – 1859) was an American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection to end slavery. He played an integral part in making Kansas a free state. However, he was unsuccessful in the raid at Harpers Ferry in 1859.

John Brown

John Brown (1800 – 1859) was an American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection…

Cover of pamphlet on the Burns case.

Burns Case

Cover of pamphlet on the Burns case.

"The Cotton-Gin, a machine that processes cotton."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Cotton Gin

"The Cotton-Gin, a machine that processes cotton."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

"Cotton Plant, which was regularly exported in small quantities from the South."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Cotton Plant

"Cotton Plant, which was regularly exported in small quantities from the South."—E. Benjamin Andrews,…

An image showing the process of picking cotton and then loading it upon merchant ships.

Picking and Loading Cotton

An image showing the process of picking cotton and then loading it upon merchant ships.

(1822-1885) An American soldier, eighteenth President of the United States and was the leading Union general in the American Civil War.

Ulysses S. Grant

(1822-1885) An American soldier, eighteenth President of the United States and was the leading Union…

(1803-1862) A Confederate general in the American Civil War who was killed during the Battle of Shiloh.

Albert Sidney Johnston

(1803-1862) A Confederate general in the American Civil War who was killed during the Battle of Shiloh.

(1809-1865) U.S. President 1960-1865

Abraham Lincoln

(1809-1865) U.S. President 1960-1865

(1809-1865) U.S. President 1960-1865

Abraham Lincoln

(1809-1865) U.S. President 1960-1865

(1809-1865) An American politician and sixteenth President of the United States and the first president from the Republican Party.

Abraham Lincoln

(1809-1865) An American politician and sixteenth President of the United States and the first president…

The illustration contains an explanation of the Omnibus Bill or Compromise of 1850. Although one bill, it contains amendments to many laws. This is shown by one cart carrying many things.

Omnibus Bill of 1850

The illustration contains an explanation of the Omnibus Bill or Compromise of 1850. Although one bill,…

"The great Anti-Slavery agitator, Wendell Phillips, was born in Boston, November 29, 1811, and was the son of the first Mayor of that city." —The Popular Cyclopedia, 1888

Wendell Phillips

"The great Anti-Slavery agitator, Wendell Phillips, was born in Boston, November 29, 1811, and was the…

A slave auction in New Orleans, Louisiana.

A Slave Auction in New Orleans

A slave auction in New Orleans, Louisiana.

A colonial slave market in the seventeenth century.

A Colonial Slave Market

A colonial slave market in the seventeenth century.

"A runaway slave, if recaptured, was sometimes compelled to wear a metal collar riveted about his neck."—Webster, 1913

A Slave's Collar

"A runaway slave, if recaptured, was sometimes compelled to wear a metal collar riveted about his neck."—Webster,…

Captain Sir John Smith (c. January 1580–June 21, 1631) Admiral of New England was an English soldier, sailor, and author. He is remembered for his role in establishing the first permanent English settlement in North America at Jamestown, Virginia.

Smith's Escape from Slavery

Captain Sir John Smith (c. January 1580–June 21, 1631) Admiral of New England was an English soldier,…

An abolitionist, and writer of more than 10 books. Her most famous piece was <em>Uncle Tom's Cabin</em> which describes life in slavery.

Harriet Beecher Stowe

An abolitionist, and writer of more than 10 books. Her most famous piece was Uncle Tom's Cabin

Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 &ndash; July 9, 1850) was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. Known as "Old Rough and Ready", Taylor had a 40-year military career in the U.S. Army, serving in the War of 1812, Black Hawk War, and Second Seminole War before achieving fame leading U.S. troops to victory at several critical battles of the Mexican-American War. A Southern slaveholder who opposed the spread of slavery to the territories, he was uninterested in politics but was recruited by the Whig Party as their nominee in the 1848 presidential election.

Zachary Taylor's Residence at Baton Rouge

Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850) was an American military leader and the twelfth…

The anti-slavery novel by Harriet Beecher Stowe was published in 1852 and had an effect on the view of slavery.

Uncle Tom's Cabin

The anti-slavery novel by Harriet Beecher Stowe was published in 1852 and had an effect on the view…

On September 7, 1676, Waldron invited about 400 Indians to participate in a mock battle against the militia. It was a trick; instead, he took them prisoner. Thirteen years passed, and it was assumed that the incident had been forgotten. But then squaws began dropping ambiguous hints that something was astir. On June 27, 1689, two Indian women appeared at each of 5 garrison houses, asking permission to sleep by the fire. All but one house accepted. In the dark early hours of the next day, the women unfastened the doors, and in rushed Indian men who had concealed themselves about the town. Waldron resisted but was stunned with a hatchet, then placed on his table. After dining, the Indians cut him across the belly with knives, each saying "I cross out my account." Major Waldron was slain with his own sword.

Death of Major Richard Waldron

On September 7, 1676, Waldron invited about 400 Indians to participate in a mock battle against the…

"Eli Whitney invented the cotton-gin in 1793."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Eli Whitney

"Eli Whitney invented the cotton-gin in 1793."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895