"The Siege of Atlanta, Ga.- Confederate attack on General Logan's Corps, July 28th, 1864. The assailants after driving in the Federal pickets moved up steadily, and, with a steady step, opened out when within four hundred yards of the fortification. Meeting no force, the assailants took courage, and when within three hundred yards raised a tremendous yell and started on the double quick; but at that instant the signal was given, and every battery, double-shotted with canister, was let loose, and the apparently deserted fortification was lined with heads, and at every foot a shining musket was aimed at the assailants. The destroying volley swept in a single instant hundreds of men into eternity, and laid thousands upon the earth maimed, many of them for life, on the plains before Atlanta. They awaited no second fire; another, and the army would have been destroyed. They therefore sought shelter beyond the range of the Federal guns."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Atlanta

"The Siege of Atlanta, Ga.- Confederate attack on General Logan's Corps, July 28th, 1864. The assailants…

"Battle of Chickamauga- repulse of the Confederates at Crawfish Creek. We present a most interesting sketch of the battle of Chickamauga, the repulse and check of the Confederate cavalry by the Twenty-fourth Illinois and Company K of the Nineteenth Illinois. They were separated from the Confederates by a stone fence and a small creek. Their daring and heroic resistance was never surpassed, some of them climbing the stone fence to meet the Confederates as they rushed madly down upon the gallant little band. They had the whole Confederate cavalry and four divisions of infantry and artillery to fight, but notwithstanding this vast odds they held their position until re-enforcements reached them. The Twenty-fourth Illinois was commanded by Colonel G. Michalotzy, who was slightly wounded in the right hand. They went into the battle with 330 men, and came out with but 163, less than half their number."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chickamauga

"Battle of Chickamauga- repulse of the Confederates at Crawfish Creek. We present a most interesting…

"Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19th-20th, 1863, between Generals Rosecrans and Bragg. Our sketch of this most important battle shows General Thomas and his staff anxiously looking for re-enforcements as his gallant troops from their temporary breastwork of loggs and knapsacks, are repulsing the retreated assaults of the overpowering Confederate forces and saving the whole Army of the Cumberland from destruction. After skirmishing on Thursday and Friday, September 17th and 18th, General Rosecrans on Saturday formed his line, with General Thomas on the left, having under him Brannan, Baird and Reynolds; Negley and Wood held the extreme right at Owen's Ford and Gordon's Mill. Crittenden's corps, consisting of Palmer's and Van Cleve's divisions, formed the centre, with part of McCook's on each side. The line generally followed the Chickamauga, though on the left it took the course of the Lafayette Road. Between ten and eleven A. M. Cranston's brigade, of Brannan's division, met the first attack, and in a few moments the whole division was forced back, Thomas then ordered his entire line to advance, and Longstreet was driven back with slaughter, losing the ground and cannon he had gained, and his corps was fast melting under the blows of Thomas, when Polk and Hill threw their corps with impetuosity on Crittenden, and after a fierce struggle routed him, and drove to the right, in similar disorder, Davis's division, of McCook's corps, leaving a wide gap in the line and exposing Thomas to a heavy flank attack. Back then his victorious troops returned to meet the new enemy, and Thomas, with Negley and Wood, from the right, rallying some of the routed centre, drove the enemy back. Before the deadly fire of this new line the Confederates everywhere retired, and before sunset Rosecrans's army held its old line. During the night Rosecrans fell back to a new line, resting Negley with his right on Missionary Ridge, Van Cleve, Wood and Sheridan on the left, and Thomas more in the centre. The fight commenced on the extreme left, and the Confederates, about ten in the morning, attacked Negley with all their strength, and Longstreet again rolled his verterans on Thomas, and again a bitterly contested fight took place. At last General Reynolds began to give way, and Wood was sent to his relief. As Davis moved to fill Wood's place the Confederates took them in flank, and routing them, severed Rosecrans's line, leaving him, with Sheridan, Davis and Wilder, cut off entirely from the mass of his army. Thomas gathered up the other portion of the army in a strong line on Missionary Ridge, and prepared to resist the last Confederate attack, made with all the inspiration of victory; but his men stood firm, and a cloud of dust to the left soon showed a line advancing on the Lafayette Road. Every eye was strained; a moment would tell whether the day's disaster must close in irreparable ruin or there was yet hope of repulsing the foe. It was General Granger with two fresh brigades, which, fresh for battle, now rushed on the enemy and drove them from a hill which they had gained; and thus aided, Thomas repulsed the enemy, and fell back, unmolested, to Rossville."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chickamauga

"Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19th-20th, 1863, between Generals Rosecrans and Bragg. Our sketch…

"Grant's Campaign in Virginia. The Battle of Coal Harbor, June 1st, 1864. On the 1st of June the Confederates were in heavy force between Coal Harbor and Gaines's Mill, in a strong position on the skirt of the woods, parallel to a road, and defended by riflepits and earthworks. The Sixth Corps of the Federal Army was in a semi-circle around Coal Harbor, and the Eighteenth on its right, along the road, separated from the enemy by a belt of woods from twenty to two hundred yards wide, and by a strip of open ground. At the half-past five the order was given to charge the Confederates works, and the Eighteenth advanced under a terrible fire of grape and canister, but, in spite of terrible loss, drove Longstreet's Confederates pell mell from their works through the woods. The enemy rallied at last, and were again brought up, but failed to regain the lost ground."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Coal Harbor

"Grant's Campaign in Virginia. The Battle of Coal Harbor, June 1st, 1864. On the 1st of June the Confederates…

"The war in Virginia. A regiment of the Eighteenth Corps carrying a portion of Beauregard's line in front of Petersburg. The first line of Confederate works, on the right, was carried by Burnside's corps. Said an officer: 'It was now about five o'clock P. M. We opened our battery at once and commenced shelling the Confederate fort. In five minutes we had three wounded. We kept on firing for about half an hour, when our infantry- Griffin's brigade- made a charge and captured the fort, taking give guns and about 200 prisoners. We had, we found, dismounted the Confederate guns by our shells.' The works on the left were carried, after a desperate fight, by the Eighteenth Corps, of which we give a near view."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Eighteenth corps

"The war in Virginia. A regiment of the Eighteenth Corps carrying a portion of Beauregard's line in…

"Picture of a hand with a gun at the Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Hand with Gun

"Picture of a hand with a gun at the Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the…

"The war in Georgia. Capture of Lost Mountain by General Hooker, June 16th, 1864. On June 14th General Hooker pushed forward, with Geary in the advance, and soon came up with the enemy. Having driven the Confederates from two hills, Geary, being without support upon his right, was forced to halt. Butterfield and Williams having arrived and formed in open fields on the right of Geary's position, about three o'clock P. M., General Hooker ordered an advance of the corps. The lines moved forward, driving the enemy's pickets rapidly before them, halting now and then a moment to dislodge some of the more stubborn of the Confederates, who maintained their fire until almost under the feet of the advancing troops. General Geary's division was the first to encounter the enemy in strong force, with whom one or two sharp volleys were exchanged, and they then fell back to their strongly intrenched lines, from which they opened a terrible fire. This was the commencement of a fierce struggle, which lasted until after dark. Under the cover of darkness the enemy threw out a strong line of skirmishers. The morning of the 15th opened with heavy firing, resulting in repelling an attack of the Confederates to break the picket lines of Geary's Second and Third Brigades. Artillery was placed along the lines, and took a prominent part in the struggle, which continued with varying intensity till after nightfall. Early on the morning of the 16th the skirmishers of Geary's First Brigade discovered that the enemy had evacuated, and they immediately pushed into the works."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Capture of Lost Mountain

"The war in Georgia. Capture of Lost Mountain by General Hooker, June 16th, 1864. On June 14th General…

"How the Daughters of Maryland received the Sons of the North as they marched against the Confederate invaders- scene on the march."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Daughters of Maryland

"How the Daughters of Maryland received the Sons of the North as they marched against the Confederate…

"Battle of Middletown, on the afternoon of the 19th of October, 1864. Great victory won by Major General Sheridan. Our sketch represents the gallant charge of the Sixth Corps, commanded by General Getty, which was made at about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 19th. It was this which decided the battle. The charge was made in face of a deadly and terrible fire from the Confederate batteries, under which the Federal troops only slightly wavered, though they never for an instant gave way. The battle ground is depicted in our sketch, lying at the foot of the Blue Ridge. The Confederate position is on the right, sheltered by a stone fence. That of the Sixth Corps is similarly protected on the left."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Middletown

"Battle of Middletown, on the afternoon of the 19th of October, 1864. Great victory won by Major General…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"The Siege of Petersburg, Va. Charge of the second division, Ninth Army Corps, into the crater, July 30th, 1864. The charge made finally by the Second Division of the Ninth Army Corps is shown from the hand of one who witnessed it near by. It was made bravely, but from faults which could not be explained valuable time had been lost, officers were absent, and the result was a sad slaughter of men which the country could not afford to lose. On arriving at the exploded fort the Federals found it a heterogeneous mass of loose earth, guns and gun carriages, dead and wounded gunners, etc. One of the charging officers, noticing the earth move near him as if a mole or gopher were at work under it, commenced digging, and finally extricated a Confederate lieutenant, who actually revived and conversed freely with the officer before being brought from the ground. Several others were exhumed from their living graves and restored to consciousness."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Petersburg

"The Siege of Petersburg, Va. Charge of the second division, Ninth Army Corps, into the crater, July…

"The war in Virginia- Sheridan's Great Battle with J. E. B. Stuart at Yellow Tavern, May 11th, 1864- the Confederate raider's last fight. We give a sketch, which our readers cannot fail to admire, of the battle of Yellow Tavern, May 11th, 1864, where General J. E. B. Stuart, whose fame began by a successful raid around McClellan, fell mortally wounded. Our correspondent wrote: 'We found the enemy very strongly entrenched behind fortifications composing the outer line of the Richmond defenses. The position was a strong one, being situated upon a hill, commanding our whole corps, and our preservation depended on our driving them out. General Sheridan was equal to the emergency. The enemy was already pursuing us closely in the rear. The general ordered Custer to take his gallant brigade and carry the position. General Custer placed himself at the head of his command, and with drawn sabres and deafening cheers charged directly in the face of a withering fire, captured two pieces of artillery, upward of one hundred prisoners, together with caissons, ammunition and horses, which he brought off in safety. It was, without exception, the most gallant charge of the raid, and when it became known among the corps cheer after cheer rent the air. The Confederates retreated behind the Chickahominy, destroying in their flight Meadow Bridge. In the rear, Colonel Gregg's brigade of the Second Division, under General Wilson, was hotly engaged with Stuart. General Wilson sent word to General Sheridan that the enemy were driving him slowly back. General Sheridan replied that he must hold the position at all hazards- that he could and must whip the enemy. Colonel Gregg's brigade being re-enforced by a regiment from the First Brigade, charged the enemy and drove them nearly a mile. The day was now ours. The enemy had disappeared from our front, and we succeeded in rebuilding the Meadow Bridge, and the First and Third Divisions crossed, covered by the Second Division which in turn withdrew and also crossed, without being annoyed by the enemy.' In a desperate charge at the head of a column the Confederate general Stuart fell mortally wounded."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Sheridan's Great Battle

"The war in Virginia- Sheridan's Great Battle with J. E. B. Stuart at Yellow Tavern, May 11th, 1864-…

"The war in Tennessee. Capture of Mission Ridge, near Rossville, by General Thomas, November 25th, 1863. Our correspondent thus graphically depicts this scene: 'Simultaneously and instantaneously the two, or rather four, columns rushed forward across the valley of Citco Creek and up to the line of the Confederate rifle pits that lined the base of Mission Ridge. These even did not claim their attention, nor did the two or three discharges of musketry which received them call for a reply. On they pushed with their glittering bayonets, signaling back a reply that startled the already dismayed foe. They abandoned the works and their camps, over and through which our men rushed with headlong speed and a velocity which of itself would have secured them victory. The enemy had opened on these columns a heavy fire from several batteries, which he had massed along his centre, to hide and in some measure remedy his now apparent weakness there. But these were only replied to by the guns of Captain Bridges on Orchard Knob and the deep-mouthed monsters of Fort Wood. The foot of the hill was reached by the advancing column in good order, and now began the difficult ascent. Half-way up, the line became broken and ragged, and it looked much as if a heavy line of skirmishers were mounting the hill. When they reached the top, and the Confederate artillerists were limbering up their pieces, the front line was no longer preserved, but the men pushed forward indiscriminately. The Confederate infantry fled and yielded up the artillery without further struggle. From below we could see the Confederate flag as it entered and passed through Fort Hindman, and gave place to that of the Union. In just three-quarters of an hour after the order was given for the assault General Turchin, of Baird's division, occupied Fort Hindman with two of his regiments, and was rapidly moving the others forward to their support. Generals Willich, Hazen and Waggener were reaping harvest of artillery. The hill was won at four o'clock, the enemy cut in two, and his organization for the time destroyed. As the hill was won, General Grant, following in the wake of the advancing column, appeared in their midst on the summit. The troops saw and recognized him, and at once there went up a shout such as only victorious men can give to a victorious leader.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Tennessee

"The war in Tennessee. Capture of Mission Ridge, near Rossville, by General Thomas, November 25th, 1863.…

"Battle of Williamsburg, Va., on the peninsula between York and James Rivers, May 6th, 1862. General Hancock's sudden charge decided the battle, for it left the real key of the position in Federal hands. With the re-enforcements with McClellan had caused to be sent him immediately upon reaching the scene, late in the afternoon. Hancock took possession of all the ground he had previously occupied, and night closed upon what proved to be a dearly bought victory for the Federals. They had, in fact, gained it after substaining a loss of 2,228 in killed and wounded, the Confederate loss being only about half that number. Early on the 6th of May Williamsburg was occupied by the Federals, while Johnston's army was again beyond the Chickahominy."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Williamsburg

"Battle of Williamsburg, Va., on the peninsula between York and James Rivers, May 6th, 1862. General…

"Second charge upon the Confederates by General Fremont's bodyguard, under Major Zagonyi, near Springfield, Mo., on October 25th, 1861. After the first charge of Major Zagonyi, described on another page, Captain McNaughton reached the scene with fifty men. The order to follow retreating Confederates was given, and all dashed ahead for a second charge through the woods. Many of the fugitives were overtaken there, as well as in the streets of Springfield and in the forest beyond the city. Only when further pursuit seemed useless did the Federals return. Zagonyi's brave followers suffered a loss of eighty-four dead and wounded in this engagement, which, for the boldness of its undertaking and the rapidity of its execution under the great disparity of numbers, certainly has but few parallels in any history."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Major Zagonyi

"Second charge upon the Confederates by General Fremont's bodyguard, under Major Zagonyi, near Springfield,…