"Gathering of Fremont's troops on the prairie, near Tipton, Mo., on the eve of its departure in pursuit of General Price." —Leslie, 1896

Freemont's troops

"Gathering of Fremont's troops on the prairie, near Tipton, Mo., on the eve of its departure in pursuit…

In Norse mythology, Frey's son Frodi is given a magic grindstone from the fairies and elves. One who grinds the stone and sings shall get whatever they wish. Unable to move the large stone, Frodi takes two Giantesses as prisoners: Menia and Fenia. They grind gold for Frodi until he falls asleep. Then they grind soldiers to fight him.

Frodi's Grindstone

In Norse mythology, Frey's son Frodi is given a magic grindstone from the fairies and elves. One who…

"Battle of Gaines's Mill, Friday, June 27th, 1862. At eleven o'clock each division, brigade, regiment and gun was in place. Some were in the broad, open field and others under the cover of the woods. The day was intensely warm, and many of the men, worn out with their previous day's fighting, lack of sleep and toilsome march, had already thrown themselves upon the ground and were indulging in a short slumber, when a sharp volley and then the roar of artillery announced that the Confederates had opened the fight. Their shells burst in front of the farmhouse which General Morell had made his headquarters. The Federal batteries, after some little delay, replied and for an hour this artillery duel and shelling the woods continued. It was not till near three o'clock in the afternoon that the engagement became general, and then the battle raged for four hours with unexampled fury. As though by common consent, there was a pause now; but it did not last long, for the enemy had evidently received large re-enforcements, as the whole Federal line was attacked, with a vigor which showed that those who made it were fresh men. To prevent defeat, General Porter sent for re-enforcements, for under the additional pressure the Federal troops were giving way. Fortunately, General Slocum's division came to the rescue, and with it Generals Palmer, French and Meagher with their brigades and two bodies of cavalry. This changed the character of the struggle. Meagher's gallant gellows, coats off and sleeves rolled up, charged the enemy and drove them back. General Palmer's men and Duryee's Zouaves also went in with valor, and finally the Confederates rolled back like a retreating wave. This was the close of the day's fight. Toward the end the Federals had fifty-four regiments on the field, numbering about 36,000 men." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gaines's Mill

"Battle of Gaines's Mill, Friday, June 27th, 1862. At eleven o'clock each division, brigade, regiment…

"Incident in the march of General Banks's Division during a storm in Western Maryland." — Frank Leslie, 1896

March of General Banks

"Incident in the march of General Banks's Division during a storm in Western Maryland." — Frank Leslie,…

A picture depicting some of General Grant's exploits.

General Grant in Action

A picture depicting some of General Grant's exploits.

A battle between English and French forces in Quebec.

Death of General Wolfe at Quebec

A battle between English and French forces in Quebec.

Republican generals sitting and talking.

Generals

Republican generals sitting and talking.

Depiction of the battle of Gettysburg.

Battle of Gettysburg

Depiction of the battle of Gettysburg.

The monument erected to remember the soldiers who fought at the Battle of Gettysburg.

The Soldiers' Monument at Gettysburg

The monument erected to remember the soldiers who fought at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Gulliver's giant hand letting the imprisoned men of Lilliput go.

Giant hand

Gulliver's giant hand letting the imprisoned men of Lilliput go.

Gulliver sitting on a building in Lilliput with all the Lilliputians gathered around him.

Giant sitting

Gulliver sitting on a building in Lilliput with all the Lilliputians gathered around him.

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"The war in Louisiana- Battle of Grand Coteau- capture of the Sixty-seventh Indiana by the Texas Mounted Infantry, November 3rd, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Grand Coteau

"The war in Louisiana- Battle of Grand Coteau- capture of the Sixty-seventh Indiana by the Texas Mounted…

"Shelling Confederate cavalry across the Potomac River from the heights of Great Falls, by Major West, of Campbell's Pennsylvania Artillery, October 4th, 1861. On Friday, october 4th, 1861, Major West, of Campbell's Pennsylvania Artillery, was ordered to shell a barn, in which there was every reason to conclude a large quantity of Confederate provisions and supplies was stored. The major, therefore, placed a Parrott gun on the heights of Great Falls, and threw a few shells across the Potomac. Several of them fell into the barn, which had the effect of unhousing a number of Confederate cavalry, who rode with all speed for the neighboring woods." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Great Falls

"Shelling Confederate cavalry across the Potomac River from the heights of Great Falls, by Major West,…

"From a Greek vase of about the time of the battle of Marathon."—Webster, 1913

Greek Soldiers in Arms

"From a Greek vase of about the time of the battle of Marathon."—Webster, 1913

A monument of Athenian foot soldier, found near Marathon.

Monument of a Greek Solider

A monument of Athenian foot soldier, found near Marathon.

An illustration of two guards escorting a man by the collar.

Guards Escorting Man

An illustration of two guards escorting a man by the collar.

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Hold On. From the drawing by Horace Vernet." -Rees, 1894

Hold On

"Hold On. From the drawing by Horace Vernet." -Rees, 1894

Horses and wagons at the Battle of Willis Church.

Horses and Wagons

Horses and wagons at the Battle of Willis Church.

An illustration of soldiers riding horses.

Men on Horsees

An illustration of soldiers riding horses.

Soldiers at the doctor's.

Hospital

Soldiers at the doctor's.

"[Caesar] mustered the soldiers in the Campius Martius, and requested a statement of their grievances. Their demands appeared to have a reference to a payment of their dues, the bestowal of promised presents, and a release from further duty. Caesar well knew that the best way to humiliate an insurrection is to grant what it clamors for. He accordingly made an address to his old legion, being careful to begin with "Citizens," instead of "Soldiers." This was gall and wormwood. To be addressed as citizens by their beloved commander! "I discharge you." said he. "You have had enough of fatigue and wounds. I release you from your oath. As to your presents, you shall be paid to the last sesterce." The old veterans could stand no more. They burst into tears, and began to beg for forgiveness. With a certain prudent hesitation, Caesar received them back to favor; but he took care that the leaders who had fomented the mutiny should be executed."—Ridpath, 1885

Citizens! I Discharge You.

"[Caesar] mustered the soldiers in the Campius Martius, and requested a statement of their grievances.…

The English Royal Navy would impress American sailors, kidnapping them to force them to serve in the military.

Impressment of American Sailors

The English Royal Navy would impress American sailors, kidnapping them to force them to serve in the…

Woman herding cattle away from British soldiers.

Hannah Erwin Israel Saving the Cattle

Woman herding cattle away from British soldiers.

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- the fight at the Licking Bridge, Cynthiana, between the Federal troops and the Morgan Confederate Guerrillas. Cynthiana, the scene of the fight between the Cincinnati volunteers and Morgan's Confederate cavalry, is the capital of Harrison County, Ky. When Morgan with his guerrilas arrived on the south side of the Licking River, on Thursday, July 17th, 1862, he found Lieutenant Colonel Landrum, of the Eighteenth Kentucky Regiment, with a hastily gathered force, ready to oppose him. The splendidly mounted Confederates were, however, too much for him, and after making a gallant defense the Confederates forced their way over the bridge, killed a number of the Federals and captured one cannon. Landrum and about forty of his troops made good their retreat to Lexington, which was in a perfect panic at the proximity of the Confederate chief." —Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Raid

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- the fight at the Licking Bridge, Cynthiana, between the Federal…

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- excitement at Convington- gathering of armed Federal citizens at the railroad and telegraph office, on hearing of the capture of Cynthiana by the Confederate Morgan. The dash of Morgan from his mountain haunts in Tennessee through Kentucky caused considerable alarm throughout the State, for it was well planned and boldly executed. It is said to have been an inspiration from Jeff Davis himself, intended to produce a general uprising in Kentucky against the Federal Government. The people, however, soon recovered from their momentary terror; and it was then seen how much stronger the Federal sentiment was in Kentucky than that of Secession." —Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Raid Rally

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- excitement at Convington- gathering of armed Federal citizens at…

An illustration of a man being knighted on a battle field.

Knighting Man on Battle Field

An illustration of a man being knighted on a battle field.

An illustration of a group of knights charging on horseback with lances.

Knights Charging with Lances

An illustration of a group of knights charging on horseback with lances.

An illustration of a group of knights in battle within sight of a castle.

Knights in Battle

An illustration of a group of knights in battle within sight of a castle.

An illustration of two knights on horses.

Knights on Horses

An illustration of two knights on horses.

An illustration of a meeting between General Lee and soldiers.

Meeting with General Lee

An illustration of a meeting between General Lee and soldiers.

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

Headquarters of General Freemont, Jefferson City, Missouri, October 1, 1861. Jefferson City is on the Missouri River, 142 miles from its mouth, and 125 miles from St. Louis. It is on the direct route of the Pacific Railroad. The location of Jefferson City is very striking. On the towering hill which frowns over the Missouri stands the Capitol, built of magnesium limestone. The town site is seamed with sharp ridges and deep hollows running parallel with the river. These had been eagerly taken advantage of in consctructing the fortifications. About a mile to the south of the city was the headquarters of General Fremont, situated upon a beautiful slope, commanding a fine military prospect. It was called Camp Lillie, after his eldest daughter, Lillie Benton Fremont.

Camp Lillie

Headquarters of General Freemont, Jefferson City, Missouri, October 1, 1861. Jefferson City is on the…

An illustration of soldiers guarding Long Bridge in Arlington, Virginia.

Soldiers Guarding Long Bridge

An illustration of soldiers guarding Long Bridge in Arlington, Virginia.

Confederate and Union forces clash at Lookout Mountain.

Battle of Lookout Mountain

Confederate and Union forces clash at Lookout Mountain.

Scene from a Civil War Battle,.

Battle of Malvern Hill

Scene from a Civil War Battle,.

Soldiers on the march in a storm during the Civil War.

March in the Storm

Soldiers on the march in a storm during the Civil War.

An illustration of military personnel marching straight with the right side of the image illustrating direction in which men are marching.

Military Personnel Marching to the Right

An illustration of military personnel marching straight with the right side of the image illustrating…

"Marcus Aurelius receiving the submission of German captives. (From a Bas-relief in the Capitoline Museum, Rome.)" -Allen, 1890

Marcus Aurelius and German Captives

"Marcus Aurelius receiving the submission of German captives. (From a Bas-relief in the Capitoline Museum,…

April 5, 1862. The General is arriving to take personal command of the Federal Army in its advance on Yorktown. He is enthusiastically received by the troops. On March 11, 1862 the president issued an order relieving General McClellan of part of the responsibility heretofore devolving upon him. The order stated that "General McClellan, having personally taken the field at the head of the Army of the Potomac, until otherwise ordered, he is relieved from the command of the other military departments he retaining the command of the Department of the Potomac."

Arrival of General McClellan

April 5, 1862. The General is arriving to take personal command of the Federal Army in its advance on…

An illustration of a large group of men in a tight formation.

Men in Tight Fomation

An illustration of a large group of men in a tight formation.

An illustration of a group of soldiers riding horses.

Men Riding Horse

An illustration of a group of soldiers riding horses.

The activity of the Confederates on the Potomac and the confluent rivers was almost incredible. In one night some point hitherto defenseless was made to bristle with cannon, and the first intimation of its locality was a leaden messenger winging its way on its mission of death. A party of the Tenth Regiment of New York Zuoaves, while out scouting through a dense wood, came suddenly in sight of Messech's Point, and there beheld the Confederates at work upon an almost completed battery, which had sprung up with magical rapidity.

Discovery of a Confederate Battery at Messech's Point

The activity of the Confederates on the Potomac and the confluent rivers was almost incredible. In one…

The American army in Mexico City.

American Army in Mexico City

The American army in Mexico City.

A militia lined up

Militia

A militia lined up

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000 strong, under General Zollicoffer, and the Federal troops, 4,000 strong, commanded by General Thomas, fought Sunday, January 19th, 1862- flight of the Confederate Army. One of the most dashing, desperate and decisive battles of the war took place on Sunday, January 19th, 1862, when a Confederate army of 8,000 men, led by Generals Zollicoffer and Crittenden, were totally routed by General Thomas, at the head of about 4,000 Federal troops. The cannonading began at four o'clock in the morning, and the engagement soon became general. Zollicoffer found, however, that instead of surprising General Thomas, that able and vigilant officer was ready for him. The Confederates fought gallantly throughout that dismal Sabbath day, and owing to their decided superiority in numbers the result was doubtful till near the conclusion of the conflict. The death of Colonel Peyton, who fell gallantly at the head of his regiment, had materially damped the spirits of the Confederates, but the fall of their commander, Zollicoffer, about ten minutes past three in the afternoon, completed their rout. At that hour, as the Fourth Kentucky regiment was deploying on the flank of the Confederate army, Zollicoffer, attended by several of his aids, mistook his way in the underwood, and suddenly emerged before Colonel Fry, who was also with several officers. At first they mistook each other for friends, but upon the mistake being discovered one of the Confederate officers fired at Fry and shot his horse. Almost at the same instant Colonel Fry drew his revolver and shot General Zollicoffer through the heart. His aids, seeing their commander slain, deserted the body, which was taken charge of by the Federal troops, and carried to Somerset. The news spread like wildfire through the Confederate army, which fled with precipitation, and at half-past three not a confederate stood his ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Mill Spring

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000…

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000 strong, under General Zollicoffer, and the Federal troops, 4,000 strong, commanded by General Thomas, fought Sunday, January 19th, 1862- flight of the Confederate Army. One of the most dashing, desperate and decisive battles of the war took place on Sunday, January 19th, 1862, when a Confederate army of 8,000 men, led by Generals Zollicoffer and Crittenden, were totally routed by General Thomas, at the head of about 4,000 Federal troops. The cannonading began at four o'clock in the morning, and the engagement soon became general. Zollicoffer found, however, that instead of surprising General Thomas, that able and vigilant officer was ready for him. The Confederates fought gallantly throughout that dismal Sabbath day, and owing to their decided superiority in numbers the result was doubtful till near the conclusion of the conflict. The death of Colonel Peyton, who fell gallantly at the head of his regiment, had materially damped the spirits of the Confederates, but the fall of their commander, Zollicoffer, about ten minutes past three in the afternoon, completed their rout. At that hour, as the Fourth Kentucky regiment was deploying on the flank of the Confederate army, Zollicoffer, attended by several of his aids, mistook his way in the underwood, and suddenly emerged before Colonel Fry, who was also with several officers. At first they mistook each other for friends, but upon the mistake being discovered one of the Confederate officers fired at Fry and shot his horse. Almost at the same instant Colonel Fry drew his revolver and shot General Zollicoffer through the heart. His aids, seeing their commander slain, deserted the body, which was taken charge of by the Federal troops, and carried to Somerset. The news spread like wildfire through the Confederate army, which fled with precipitation, and at half-past three not a confederate stood his ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Mill Spring

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000…

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000 strong, under General Zollicoffer, and the Federal troops, 4,000 strong, commanded by General Thomas, fought Sunday, January 19th, 1862- flight of the Confederate Army. One of the most dashing, desperate and decisive battles of the war took place on Sunday, January 19th, 1862, when a Confederate army of 8,000 men, led by Generals Zollicoffer and Crittenden, were totally routed by General Thomas, at the head of about 4,000 Federal troops. The cannonading began at four o'clock in the morning, and the engagement soon became general. Zollicoffer found, however, that instead of surprising General Thomas, that able and vigilant officer was ready for him. The Confederates fought gallantly throughout that dismal Sabbath day, and owing to their decided superiority in numbers the result was doubtful till near the conclusion of the conflict. The death of Colonel Peyton, who fell gallantly at the head of his regiment, had materially damped the spirits of the Confederates, but the fall of their commander, Zollicoffer, about ten minutes past three in the afternoon, completed their rout. At that hour, as the Fourth Kentucky regiment was deploying on the flank of the Confederate army, Zollicoffer, attended by several of his aids, mistook his way in the underwood, and suddenly emerged before Colonel Fry, who was also with several officers. At first they mistook each other for friends, but upon the mistake being discovered one of the Confederate officers fired at Fry and shot his horse. Almost at the same instant Colonel Fry drew his revolver and shot General Zollicoffer through the heart. His aids, seeing their commander slain, deserted the body, which was taken charge of by the Federal troops, and carried to Somerset. The news spread like wildfire through the Confederate army, which fled with precipitation, and at half-past three not a confederate stood his ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Mill Spring

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000…

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000 strong, under General Zollicoffer, and the Federal troops, 4,000 strong, commanded by General Thomas, fought Sunday, January 19th, 1862- flight of the Confederate Army. One of the most dashing, desperate and decisive battles of the war took place on Sunday, January 19th, 1862, when a Confederate army of 8,000 men, led by Generals Zollicoffer and Crittenden, were totally routed by General Thomas, at the head of about 4,000 Federal troops. The cannonading began at four o'clock in the morning, and the engagement soon became general. Zollicoffer found, however, that instead of surprising General Thomas, that able and vigilant officer was ready for him. The Confederates fought gallantly throughout that dismal Sabbath day, and owing to their decided superiority in numbers the result was doubtful till near the conclusion of the conflict. The death of Colonel Peyton, who fell gallantly at the head of his regiment, had materially damped the spirits of the Confederates, but the fall of their commander, Zollicoffer, about ten minutes past three in the afternoon, completed their rout. At that hour, as the Fourth Kentucky regiment was deploying on the flank of the Confederate army, Zollicoffer, attended by several of his aids, mistook his way in the underwood, and suddenly emerged before Colonel Fry, who was also with several officers. At first they mistook each other for friends, but upon the mistake being discovered one of the Confederate officers fired at Fry and shot his horse. Almost at the same instant Colonel Fry drew his revolver and shot General Zollicoffer through the heart. His aids, seeing their commander slain, deserted the body, which was taken charge of by the Federal troops, and carried to Somerset. The news spread like wildfire through the Confederate army, which fled with precipitation, and at half-past three not a confederate stood his ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Mill Spring

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000…

An illustration two minstrels playing instruments for two guards.

Minstrels Playing

An illustration two minstrels playing instruments for two guards.