A diagram showing six different parts of a grape vine. These parts include the shoot, cane, arm, branch, spur, and stem (trunk).

Ideal Vine for Cane Renewal

A diagram showing six different parts of a grape vine. These parts include the shoot, cane, arm, branch,…

"The great toe is generally the strongest, but this is not an absolute law; a projection which is found on the leg of some species is designated a spur, and is a formidable weapon."

Foot of Coot

"The great toe is generally the strongest, but this is not an absolute law; a projection which is found…

"Griffe from Vézelay. GRIFFE. In medieval architecture, from the eleventh to the fifteenth century, an ornament on the bases of pillars, connecting the torus with each angle of the plinth." -Whitney, 1911

Griffe

"Griffe from Vézelay. GRIFFE. In medieval architecture, from the eleventh to the fifteenth century,…

"Griffe from Poissy; end of 12th century. GRIFFE. In medieval architecture, from the eleventh to the fifteenth century, an ornament on the bases of pillars, connecting the torus with each angle of the plinth." -Whitney, 1911

Griffe

"Griffe from Poissy; end of 12th century. GRIFFE. In medieval architecture, from the eleventh to the…

"Flower of Tropaeolum majus showing the spur." -Lindley, 1853

Garden Nasturtium

"Flower of Tropaeolum majus showing the spur." -Lindley, 1853

"The great toe is generally the strongest, but this is not an absolute law; a projection which is found on the leg of some species is designated a spur, and is a formidable weapon."

Foot of Pheasant

"The great toe is generally the strongest, but this is not an absolute law; a projection which is found…

An instrument having a little wheel, with sharp points, worn on a horseman's heels, to prick a horse in order to hasten his pace.

Spur

An instrument having a little wheel, with sharp points, worn on a horseman's heels, to prick a horse…

An illustration of a spur.

Spur

An illustration of a spur.

"Rotation of a Wheel. The same force which throws the wire away from the mercury, will cause the rotation of a spur-wheel. For this purpose the conducting wire, instead of being suspended, as in the former experiment, must be fixed firmly to the arm. A support for the axis of the wheel may be made by soldering a short piece to the side of the conducting wire, so as to make the form of a fork, the lower end of which must be flattened with a hammer, and pierced with fine orifices, o recieve the ends of the axis." —Comstock, 1850

Wheel Rotation

"Rotation of a Wheel. The same force which throws the wire away from the mercury, will cause the rotation…