"Burning of the Confederate gunboats, rams, etc., at New Orleans and Algiers, on the approach of the Federal fleet." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of Confederate gunboats

"Burning of the Confederate gunboats, rams, etc., at New Orleans and Algiers, on the approach of the…

"The investment of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, Ark., by the Federal troops under General McClernand, and its bombardment by the Federal gunboats commanded by Rear Admiral D. D. Porter, January 11th, 1863. Fort Hindman was what is known in military parlance as a star fort, with four angles- two on the river and two extending nearly to the morass in the rear. In front of the southwestern angle was a cluster of small houses, into which the enemy had thrown their sharpshooters, and from which a most galling fire was poured upon Burbridge's brigade, which stormed them and carried them by assault. At the given signal, on went the splendid brigade with a shout and a yell, now floundering like bemired horses in the morass, then pausing to dress their lines as if on parade, and anon charging again, regardless of the storm of grape and shell, shot and canister that pelted pitilessly around them. For three long hours they fought ere the houses were carried and made to screen the Federal troops. All that while sharpshooters were picking off, from their secure hiding places, officers and men; 10-pound Parrotts were sending their hissing messengers of death through the lines of the devoted brigade, crushing its bones, spattering its brains, and strewing its path with mangeled corpses and dying men. At last the houses were gained and occupied by the Eighty-third Ohio, which, with the Ninety-sixth Ohio, the Sixteenth, the Sixtieth and Sixty-seventh Indiana and the Twenty-third Wisconsin, had fought for them so gallantly."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Hindman

"The investment of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, Ark., by the Federal troops under General McClernand,…

"The United States gunboat <em>Mohawk</em> chasing the Confederate steamer <em>Spray</em> into the St. Mark's River." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Mohawk

"The United States gunboat Mohawk chasing the Confederate steamer Spray into the St.…

"The New Jersey troops crossing the Chesapeake Bay, in sixteen propellers, on their way to Washington, May 4th, 1861." — Frank Leslie, 1896

New Jersey troops

"The New Jersey troops crossing the Chesapeake Bay, in sixteen propellers, on their way to Washington,…

An oil steamer on the Caspian Sea.

Oil Steamer

An oil steamer on the Caspian Sea.

"Second naval battle in Hampton Roads- fight between the Federal ironclad <em>Monitor</em>, of two guns, and the Confederate iron-plated steamers <em>Merrimac, Yorktown</em>, and <em>Jamestown</em>, carrying twenty-four guns, March 9th, 1862. But the gloom that had begun to settle on the fort was greatly dispelled when, toward midnight, an iron marine monster, unlike anything that had ever before been seen on the ocean, made its appearance off the forts. It proved to be the Ericsson iron floating battery of two guns, just from new York. The state of affairs was hastily explained to her commander, and she steamed off to the rescue of the deserted <em>Minnesota</em>. When day dawned the Confederate flotilla, flushed with the success of the previous day, bored down on what was supposed to be an easy prey. the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> drawing least water (The <em>Merrimac</em> evidently afraid of grounding) were ahead, when their course was suddenly stopped by the strange craft, which seemed to have dropped from the clouds. They thought to overcome her easily, and opened fire confidently; but a few of the heavy shot of the <em>Monitor</em>, which battered through and through their iron sides, drove them back in panic behind the gigantic <em>Merrimac</em>, against which the <em>Monitor</em> advanced in turn. And then commenced the most extraordinary naval contest known to history- the first battle between ironclad steamers every fought, and one in which all the appliances of modern skill were brought in conflict. The fight lasted for nearly five hours, when the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> fled up the James River, and the <em>Merrimac</em>, disabled, and in a sinking condition, retreated into Norfolk. The <em>Minnesota</em>, having grounded, was then got off, and the <em>Mintor</em>, a proud proof of the designer's genius and skill, rode undisputed monarch of Hampton waters." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Second naval battle

"Second naval battle in Hampton Roads- fight between the Federal ironclad Monitor, of two guns,…

"Ship Island, near the mouth of the Mississippi- United States war steamer "Mississippi" firing on a Confederate steamer." —Leslie, 1896

Ship Island

"Ship Island, near the mouth of the Mississippi- United States war steamer "Mississippi" firing on a…

Ships at the burning of the White House.

Ship

Ships at the burning of the White House.

Ships at the burning of the White House.

Ship

Ships at the burning of the White House.

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position at the White House, and breaking up the commisariat depot on the Pamunkey River- departure of the Union flortilla for the James River, June 26th, 1862. The Confederate raid of Stuart's cavalry at Garlick's Landing and Tunstall's Station had struck the occupants of the White House Landing with a deep sense of insecurity; and, consequently, when they received orders on Wednesday, June 25th, to prepare for the hasty removal of all the government stores, they set to work with great activity, and by Thursday the greater portion of the heavy stores were embarked on board the numerous transports lying in the river. Unfortunately, through some accident the White house took fire, and the house of Washington's wife was soon destroyed." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of the White House

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position…

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position at the White House, and breaking up the commisariat depot on the Pamunkey River- departure of the Union flortilla for the James River, June 26th, 1862. The Confederate raid of Stuart's cavalry at Garlick's Landing and Tunstall's Station had struck the occupants of the White House Landing with a deep sense of insecurity; and, consequently, when they received orders on Wednesday, June 25th, to prepare for the hasty removal of all the government stores, they set to work with great activity, and by Thursday the greater portion of the heavy stores were embarked on board the numerous transports lying in the river. Unfortunately, through some accident the White house took fire, and the house of Washington's wife was soon destroyed." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of the White House

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position…