"The Admiralty anchor differs only from the ordinary anchor in having a nut, a, worked on the square, so that a wooden stock may be fitted temporarily if the iron stock is damaged, and that its proportions and form have been carefully considered and definately fixed." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Admiralty's Anchor

"The Admiralty anchor differs only from the ordinary anchor in having a nut, a, worked on the square,…

"The vertical or supporting beam of the A. is the shank, B; at the upper end of it is the ring, r; and just below the ring is a transverse piece called the stock, s s; the other extremity is the crown, c, from which branch out two arms or blades, g, in directions nearly at right angles to that of the stock; each arm spreads out into a broad palm or fluke, h, the sharp extremity of which is the peak or bill, k." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Anchor

"The vertical or supporting beam of the A. is the shank, B; at the upper end of it is the ring, r; and…

A form of a share of bank stock.

Bank Stock

A form of a share of bank stock.

An illustration of two birds. On the left side is a European wood pigeon and on the right is a stock-dove.

Birds

An illustration of two birds. On the left side is a European wood pigeon and on the right is a stock-dove.

"Block shears act with additional leverage, and can consequently be used for rather thicker metal, the upper bow being replaced by a long straight handle, and the lower one by a stake which can by firmly fixed in a block of woood or otherwise." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Block Shears

"Block shears act with additional leverage, and can consequently be used for rather thicker metal, the…

"A, is the cathead; B, the fish davit; C, and E, bollards; D, the bill-board. The anchor is held in place by two chains, a and b, termed the cat-stopper and shank vainter respectively, each of which is fitted with a long link at one end. A bolt b, about 5 or 6 inches long, is fixed on the side of the cathead, on a hinge at its lower end; it is held in the upright position by another bolt c, which passes through the cathead, and is worked by a lever d; d is provided with a hole at the end for a lanyard, so that two or three men can pull it. This whole arrangement is termed a slip-stopper. A somewhat similar combination of bolts and levers is fitted close tot he bill-board D, e being a short bolt secured at its lower end with a hinge to the ship's side; and f a hooked lever which holds it in its upright position; f has a socket at its inboard end, to which a shifting arm, provided with a lanyard like the lever d, is fitted." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Bower Anchor

"A, is the cathead; B, the fish davit; C, and E, bollards; D, the bill-board. The anchor is held in…

"Cleft-grafting is another method in common use. The stock a is cleft down from the horizontal cut d, and the scion, when cut to a thin wedge form, as shown at c and e, is inserted into the cleft; the whole is then bound up and clayed as in the former case. This is not so goood a plan as wip-grafting; it is improved by sloping the stock on one side to the size of the graft." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Cleft-Grafting

"Cleft-grafting is another method in common use. The stock a is cleft down from the horizontal cut d,…

"The shank is the straight part, ab; the square, ac, is that part of the shank to which the stock and the shackle are attached; d is the crown; de and df the arms; gg the palms or flukes; the pee, the bill or the point is the extreme end of the arm beyond the palm; the blade is the part of the arm at the back of the palm; h is the shackle or ring to which the cable is attahed; kl is the stock, placed at right angles to the plane or the arms and shank." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Common Anchor

"The shank is the straight part, ab; the square, ac, is that part of the shank to which the stock and…

"Flower-stock, Leaves, and cluster of Berries of the Common Elder (Sambucus nigra)." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Common Elder

"Flower-stock, Leaves, and cluster of Berries of the Common Elder (Sambucus nigra)." — Chambers'…

"Crown-grafting is preferable to cleft-grafting, inasmuch as it leaves no open spaces in the wood. The stock b is cut off horizontally or nearly so, and a slit is then cut in the bark f, f, a wedge-shaped piece of ivory being inserted to raise the bark; the scion is then cut to the same wedge-shaped form g, h, and inserted in the space opened for it between the albumen and the bark, after which it is tied down and clayed over in the manner already described." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown-Grafting

"Crown-grafting is preferable to cleft-grafting, inasmuch as it leaves no open spaces in the wood. The…

"Cutting pliers and cutting nippers have a pair of knife edges so arranged as to work exactly opposite to one another, the handles, on being tightly grasped, affording sufficient leverage for these edges to be forced to a short distance into the two opposite sides of a nail or wire, which, if of small diameter or of soft metal, can thus be cut asunder." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Cutting Pliers

"Cutting pliers and cutting nippers have a pair of knife edges so arranged as to work exactly opposite…

"The softening of leather is helped and rendered thorough by working them for some time in the stocks after they have been well soaked." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Double-Acting Stock

"The softening of leather is helped and rendered thorough by working them for some time in the stocks…

The stock dove, which prefers a mountainous habitat.

Stock dove

The stock dove, which prefers a mountainous habitat.

This is a simple agricultural machine which dispenses common food for poultry and similar stock.

Automatic Stock and Poultry Feeder

This is a simple agricultural machine which dispenses common food for poultry and similar stock.

"A form of glass cutter with a cast-iron handle." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Glass Cutter

"A form of glass cutter with a cast-iron handle." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"Field-gun Carriage. A, stock. B, cheek. a, lunette; b, trail-plate; c, c, pointing-rings; d, handle; e, e, prolonge-hooks; f, wheel-guard plate; g, lock-chain bolt, nut, and washer; h, turn buckle, chain, and hasp for sponge and rammer; i, stop for rammer-head; k, ear-plate for worm; l, elevating-screw; m, under-strap; n, implement-hook; o, D-ring for hand-spike; q, trunnion-plate; r, cap-square; s, s, cap-square chains and keys; 1, prolonge; 2, sponge and rammer; 3, hand-spike." -Whitney, 1911

Field Gun Carriage

"Field-gun Carriage. A, stock. B, cheek. a, lunette; b, trail-plate; c, c, pointing-rings; d, handle;…

"Gun. A, breech; B, barrel; C, band; D, breech-block; E, butt; F, butt- or heel-plate; G, front sight or bead; H, guard- or trigger-plate; I, guard-bow; K, hammer; L, lock; M, peep-sight; N, N, pipes; O, pistol-grip; P, rear sight; Q, receiver; R, side-screws or -nails; S, S, stock; T, tip; U, trigger; V, wiping-rod." -Whitney, 1911

Parts of the Gun

"Gun. A, breech; B, barrel; C, band; D, breech-block; E, butt; F, butt- or heel-plate; G, front sight…

"The anchor is represented in the position in which it lies on the ground just before taking hold. The shank is made in one forging, is of rectangular section, having a shoulder for the stock to fit against, and is increased both in thickness and area at the crown; the arms with the palms are forged in one piece, and then bent to the required shape; one of the arms is passed through a hole in the crown and is kept in position by a bolt screwed through the end of the crown, so that its point reaches a little way into an indent made for it in the round part at the back of the arms." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Martin's Anchor

"The anchor is represented in the position in which it lies on the ground just before taking hold. The…

Trees in a pasture.

Trees in a pasture

Trees in a pasture.

"With the right hand carry the piece in front of the center of the body, barrel to the rear and vertical, grasp it with the left hand at the balance, forearm horizontal and resting against the body. Grasp the small of the stock with the right hand." — Moss, 1914

Present arms

"With the right hand carry the piece in front of the center of the body, barrel to the rear and vertical,…

"Propagation by Cuttings." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Propagation

"Propagation by Cuttings." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"A ratchet brace is a powerful instrument, and carries in itself the screw for obtaining the requisite pressure. Small holes can be drilled under a light pressure with rapid rotation on the part of the drill." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Ratchet Brace

"A ratchet brace is a powerful instrument, and carries in itself the screw for obtaining the requisite…

"The stock is of iron in large as well as small anchors, and is made with a mortice, to fit over the shank instead of passing through it. It is somewhat heavier than the stocks of other anchors; the arms are shorter than usual in proportion to the length of the shank, and are of a wedge shape, varying in sharpness from the throat to the head of the palms; the back part of the arms is parallel from palm to palm; the palm is double concave on the front, and has a small border at the edge for confining the soil through which it is dragged." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Rodger's Anchor

"The stock is of iron in large as well as small anchors, and is made with a mortice, to fit over the…

"Fahlias and paeonies may be grafted by inserting young shoots into the neck of one of the fleshy roots of each kind respectively the best method of doing so being to cut a triangular section near the upper end of the root, just large enough to admit the young shoot when slightly pared away in two sides to give it a similar form." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Root-Grafting

"Fahlias and paeonies may be grafted by inserting young shoots into the neck of one of the fleshy roots…

"In the case of large woody plants thus worked the grafted roots, after the operation is completed, are planted in nursery beds, so that the upper buds only are exposed to the atmosphere, as shown at c in the figure." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Root-Grafting

"In the case of large woody plants thus worked the grafted roots, after the operation is completed,…

"The ordinary sheet-metal shears merely resemble very powerful scissors, and, their action being quite local, they serve well for dividing the plates or other thin sheets for which alone they are suitable." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Sheet-metal Shears

"The ordinary sheet-metal shears merely resemble very powerful scissors, and, their action being quite…

"The simplest and most generally practised form of budding is that called Shield budding or T-budding. The operator should be provided with a budding-knife in which the cutting edge of the blade is rounded off at the point, and which has a thin ivory or bone handle, for raising the bark of the stock. A horizonal incision is made in the bark quite down to the wood, and from this a perpendicular slit is drawn downwards to the extent of perhaps an inch, so that the slit has a resemblance to the letter T, as at a. A bud is then cut by a clean incision from the tree intended to be propagated, having a portion of the wood attached to it, and so that the whole may be an inch and a half long, as at d." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Shield-Budding

"The simplest and most generally practised form of budding is that called Shield budding or T-budding.…

"The carbine boot may be used to advantage in splinting fractures of the thigh and leg." — Moss, 1914

Military splint

"The carbine boot may be used to advantage in splinting fractures of the thigh and leg." — Moss,…

"The carbine boot may be used to advantage in splinting fractures of the thigh and leg." — Moss, 1914

Military splint

"The carbine boot may be used to advantage in splinting fractures of the thigh and leg." — Moss,…

"The wood-worker's main stand-by for boring is the stock or brace and set of bits." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Stock

"The wood-worker's main stand-by for boring is the stock or brace and set of bits." — Encyclopedia…

A stock used to tighten and loosen bolts.

Stock

A stock used to tighten and loosen bolts.

"The parts are the butt, A; small, B; magazine well, C; barrel bed, D; air chamber, E, which reduces the charring effect og a heater barrel on the stock; small butt plate screw hole and seat for the butt plate tang, F; butt swivel plate seat, G; mortise for receiver tang lug and hole for rear guard screw, H; mortise for sear and slot for trigger, I; cut-off thumb-piece recess, J; mortise for recoil on the receiver, K; bed for fixed base, L; grasping grooves, N; shoulder for lower band, O; bed for band spring, P; shoulder for upper band, Q; channels for decreasing weight, R; upper band screw hole, S; and the stock screw hole, T. The large hole in butt is for decreasing weight, and the smaller one is a pocket for the combination oiler and thong case." — Moss, 1914

Stock, right side view

"The parts are the butt, A; small, B; magazine well, C; barrel bed, D; air chamber, E, which reduces…

"The parts are the butt, A; small, B; magazine well, C; barrel bed, D; air chamber, E, which reduces the charring effect og a heater barrel on the stock; small butt plate screw hole and seat for the butt plate tang, F; butt swivel plate seat, G; mortise for receiver tang lug and hole for rear guard screw, H; mortise for sear and slot for trigger, I; cut-off thumb-piece recess, J; mortise for recoil on the receiver, K; bed for fixed base, L; grasping grooves, N; shoulder for lower band, O; bed for band spring, P; shoulder for upper band, Q; channels for decreasing weight, R; upper band screw hole, S; and the stock screw hole, T. The large hole in butt is for decreasing weight, and the smaller one is a pocket for the combination oiler and thong case." — Moss, 1914

Stock, top view

"The parts are the butt, A; small, B; magazine well, C; barrel bed, D; air chamber, E, which reduces…

An illustration of a store.

Store

An illustration of a store.

Ten week stock and intermediate stock are the common name of matthiola incana annua. It is an annual, early bloomer.

Ten Week Stock

Ten week stock and intermediate stock are the common name of matthiola incana annua. It is an annual,…

"The stock is of iron, similar to the Admiralty anchor; the shank is of rectangular section, somewhat larger at the center than at the ends, and is made fork-shaped at one end to receive the arms; the arms are in one piece, and are connected to the shank by a bolt passing through their center." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Trotman's Anchor

"The stock is of iron, similar to the Admiralty anchor; the shank is of rectangular section, somewhat…

"Whip-grafting or tongue-grafting is the most usual mode of performing the operation. The stock is headed off by an oblique transverse cut as shown at a, a slice is then pared off the side as at b, and on the face of this a tongue or notch is made, the cut being in a downward direction; the scion c is pared off in a similar way by a single clean sharp cut, and this is notched or tongued in the opposite direction as the figure indicates, the two are then fitted together as shown at d, so that the inner bark of each may come in contact at least on one side, and then tied round with damp soft bast as at c; next some grafting clay is taken on the forefinger and pushed down on each side so as to fill out the space between the top of the stock and the graft, and a portion is also rubbed over the ligatures on the side where the graft is placed." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Whip-Grafting

"Whip-grafting or tongue-grafting is the most usual mode of performing the operation. The stock is headed…