"The Treasury of Atreus" — Morey, 1903

Atreus

"The Treasury of Atreus" — Morey, 1903

This is a thirty day sight draft bill of exchange for $24 / 120 livres tournois from the Continental Congress issued in Maryland.

Continental Draft

This is a thirty day sight draft bill of exchange for $24 / 120 livres tournois from the Continental…

"Afterwards [Solon] went to Sardis and made the acquaintance of Cresus. It was on this occasion that the celebrated interview occurred which has been so much repeated for its lesson. Cresus, desiring to make an impression on his visitor, took him into his treasury and showed him his riches."—Ridpath, 1885

Cresus Showing Solon His Treasures

"Afterwards [Solon] went to Sardis and made the acquaintance of Cresus. It was on this occasion that…

Durham was a lawyer and comptroller of the treasury.

Milton J. Durham

Durham was a lawyer and comptroller of the treasury.

Alexander Hamilton, the first Secretary of the Treasury.

Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton, the first Secretary of the Treasury.

In 1690, The Massachusetts Bay Colony issued the first paper money in the colonies, called Colonial Notes, which would later form the United States.

Reverse of a Massachusetts Treasury Note

In 1690, The Massachusetts Bay Colony issued the first paper money in the colonies, called Colonial…

The Parthenon is a temple of the Greek goddess Athena, built in the 5th century BC on the Athenian Acropolis. It is the most important surviving building of Classical Greece, generally considered to be the culmination of the development of the Doric order. Its decorative sculptures are considered one of the high points of Greek art. The Parthenon is regarded as an enduring symbol of ancient Greece and of Athenian democracy, and is considered one of the world's greatest cultural monuments. The Greek Ministry of Culture is currently carrying out a program of restoration and reconstruction. Like most Greek temples, the Parthenon was used as a treasury, and for a time served as the treasury of the Delian League, which later became the Athenian Empire. In the 6th century AD, the Parthenon was converted into a Christian church dedicated to the Virgin. After the Ottoman conquest, it was converted into a mosque in the early 1460s, and it even had a minaret. On 26 September 1687 an Ottoman ammunition dump inside the building was ignited by Venetian bombardment. The resulting explosion severely damaged the Parthenon and its sculptures. In 1806, Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin removed some of the surviving sculptures, with Ottoman permission. These sculptures, now known as the Elgin or Parthenon Marbles, were sold in 1816 to the British Museum in London, where they are now displayed. The Greek government is committed to the return of the sculptures to Greece, so far with no success.

Parthenon

The Parthenon is a temple of the Greek goddess Athena, built in the 5th century BC on the Athenian Acropolis.…

John Sherman nicknamed "The Ohio Icicle" (May 10, 1823 – October 22, 1900) was a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from Ohio during the Civil War and into the late nineteenth century.

John Sherman

John Sherman nicknamed "The Ohio Icicle" (May 10, 1823 – October 22, 1900) was a U.S. Representative…

Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, England, on the north bank of the River Thames. The Tower of London is often identified with the White Tower, the original stark square fortress built by William the Conqueror in 1078. However, the tower as a whole is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. The tower's primary function was a fortress, a royal palace, and a prison (particularly for high status and royal prisoners).

Procession to the Tower of London

Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically…

The name Traitors' Gate has been used since the early seventeenth century, prisoners were brought by barge along the Thames, passing under London Bridge, where the heads of recently executed prisoners were displayed on pikes. Anne Boleyn, Sir Thomas More, Queen Catherine Howard, and Anne Boleyn's daughter, Elizabeth I, all entered the Tower by Traitors' Gate.

Traitor's Gate, Tower of London

The name Traitors' Gate has been used since the early seventeenth century, prisoners were brought by…

The Treasury building.

Treasury

The Treasury building.