"Siege of Vicksburg- cannon dismounted inside the Confederate works."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Cannon dismounted

"Siege of Vicksburg- cannon dismounted inside the Confederate works."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"General Edward Ferrero was born in Granada, Spain, January 18th, 1831. His parents were Italian, and he was brought to the United States when an infant. At the beginning of the war he was lieutenant colonel of the Eleventh New York Militia Regiment. In 1861 he raised the fifty-first New York Regiment, called the "Shepard Rifles," and led a brigade in Burnside's expedition to Roanoke Island, where his regiment took the first fortified redoubt captured in the war. He was in the battles of South Moutain and Antietam, and for his bravery in the latter engagement was appointed brigadier general, September 19th, 1862. He served with distinction at Fredericksburg, Vicksburg and the siege of Petersburg. He was brevetted a major general, December 2nd, 1864, and mustered out in 1865." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Edward Ferrero

"General Edward Ferrero was born in Granada, Spain, January 18th, 1831. His parents were Italian, and…

"Daring and desperate attack- surprise and capture of the United States gunboat <em>Harriet Lane</em> by the Confederates under General Magruder, and destruction of the flagship <em>Westfield</em>, in Galveston Harbor, Tex., January 1st, 1863. About two o'clock in the morning of January 1st, 1863, the Federal gunboats were attacked by five Confederate steamers, protected by double rows of bales of cotton, and loaded with troops armed with rifles, muskets, etc. The <em>Harriet Lane</em> was captured by boarding, after about all her officers, including Captain Wainwright and Lieutenant Commander Lee, and a crew of 130, all told, had been killed by muskettry from the Confederate steamers. The gunboats <em>Clifton</em> and <em>Owasco</em> were engaged and escaped, the former losing no men and but one wounded. The <em>Owasco</em> lost one killed and fifteen wounded. Two barks, loaded with coal, fell into the hands of the Confederates. The <em>Westfield</em> (flagship, Commodore Renshaw) was not engaged, being ashore in another channel. Her crew were transferred to transports, and Commodore Renshaw, fearing she would fall into the hands of the Confederates, blew her up. By some mismanagement or accident the exploion took place before a boat containing Commodore Renshaw, First Lieutenant Zimmerman and the boat's crew got away, and they were blown up with the ship. The Confederate force was estimated at 5,000, under the command of General Magruder. The Federal land force, under the command of Colonel Burrill, of Masschusetts, did not exceed 300, the residue not having disembarked at the time of the fight. The Federal loss was 160 killed and 200 taken prisoners. The navy suffered the most. The Confederate loss was much greater, as the Federal guns were firing grape and canister continually in their midst."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Harriet Lane

"Daring and desperate attack- surprise and capture of the United States gunboat Harriet Lane

William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator and author.

William T. Sherman

William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman,…

Surrender of Vicksburg

Vicksburg

Surrender of Vicksburg

"Skirmishing in the woods, on the advance to Vicksburg. Our artist presents a most beautiful scene, could we but forget the deadly nature of it. A party of skirmishers, thrown in front in the almost impenetrable forest, came suddenly upon a similar party of the enemy, and the woods soon rang with the sharp report of the rifle, sending death to each other, and announcing to the main bodies that the struggle had begun."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Advance to Vicksburg

"Skirmishing in the woods, on the advance to Vicksburg. Our artist presents a most beautiful scene,…

A view of Vicksburg, Mississippi which was first settled by the French, who built Fort-Saint-Pierre in 1719.

Vicksurg, Mississippi

A view of Vicksburg, Mississippi which was first settled by the French, who built Fort-Saint-Pierre…

"Siege of Vicksburg. Life in the trenches- bivouac of Leggett's Brigade- McPherson's Corps at the White House. Our illustration shows the life led by the besieging troops. The deep ravine is studded with the rude huts, or quarters, burrowed in the earth. Here, at the White House, well riddled with Confederate shell, were bivouacked Leggett's Brigade of McPherson's Seventeenth Army Corps. To the left of the house an opening in the bank shows the entrance to the covered way by which the Confederate works were approached. The operation of mining the enemy's works is here shown. This was conducted by Captain Hickenloper, Chief Engineer of General McPherson's Staff. The sketch was made in the sap, within fifteen feet of the Confederate Fort Hill, behind which lay the Confederate sharpshooters, held at bay by Coonskin and other riflemen eagerly on the lookout for a Confederate head."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Vicksburg

"Siege of Vicksburg. Life in the trenches- bivouac of Leggett's Brigade- McPherson's Corps at the White…

"Waterhouse's Battery, Sherman's Corps, before Vicksburg. The interior view of Waterhouse's battery, in Tuttle's division, shows the guns in position and the huts in which the men are crowded. These were built of canes tied together and covered with branches, the soldiers resorting to the style of dwelling of the Indians who dwelt there two centuries ago."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Waterhouse's Battery

"Waterhouse's Battery, Sherman's Corps, before Vicksburg. The interior view of Waterhouse's battery,…