"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents a Federal baggage train hastening on to Falmouth with commissary stores for General Burnside's army before the crossing of the Rappahannock to attack Fredericksburg. The immense labor and fatigue attendant on operations in this region may be conceived by our sketch. The fearful road over rocks and cliffs, the storms, the constant fear of surprise by the enemy, where escape and defense are alike impossible, give to the life of the army train all the perils of romance."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage Train

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents…

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents a Federal baggage train hastening on to Falmouth with commissary stores for General Burnside's army before the crossing of the Rappahannock to attack Fredericksburg. The immense labor and fatigue attendant on operations in this region may be conceived by our sketch. The fearful road over rocks and cliffs, the storms, the constant fear of surprise by the enemy, where escape and defense are alike impossible, give to the life of the army train all the perils of romance."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage Train

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents…

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents a Federal baggage train hastening on to Falmouth with commissary stores for General Burnside's army before the crossing of the Rappahannock to attack Fredericksburg. The immense labor and fatigue attendant on operations in this region may be conceived by our sketch. The fearful road over rocks and cliffs, the storms, the constant fear of surprise by the enemy, where escape and defense are alike impossible, give to the life of the army train all the perils of romance."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage Train

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." —Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." —Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." —Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

Emigrant and freight wagon of pioneer days.

Freight Wagon

Emigrant and freight wagon of pioneer days.

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

Horses and wagons at the Battle of Willis Church.

Horses and Wagons

Horses and wagons at the Battle of Willis Church.

"Man walking dogs in the 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Man walking dogs

"Man walking dogs in the 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened…

"Modes of travel in the West. An old stage-coach and prairie schooner." -Gordy, 1916

Stagecoach and Prairie Schooner

"Modes of travel in the West. An old stage-coach and prairie schooner." -Gordy, 1916

"Virginia market-wagon from the American Revolution."—Lossing, 1851

Wagon

"Virginia market-wagon from the American Revolution."—Lossing, 1851

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged with the enemy. This desperate battle between the Confederates on one hand and the divisions of General Heintzelman and Franklin on the other was fought on the morning of Monday, June 30th, 1862, at Willis Church, a place midway between the White Oak Swamp Bridge and Turkey Bend, where, later in the day, another fierce fight raged, the week of combat being closed next day by the deadly but drawn battle of Malvern Hill. Our sketch represents the position of part of the Federal army at ten o'clock in the morning, just as the battle was commencing. The baggage train is in the foreground, and the enemy is advancing upon the Federal lines, and covering the advance with a heavy shower of shells. Willis Church is on the left of the illustration, being what most of the Southern places of worship were, mere wooden barns." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Willis Church

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged…

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged with the enemy. This desperate battle between the Confederates on one hand and the divisions of General Heintzelman and Franklin on the other was fought on the morning of Monday, June 30th, 1862, at Willis Church, a place midway between the White Oak Swamp Bridge and Turkey Bend, where, later in the day, another fierce fight raged, the week of combat being closed next day by the deadly but drawn battle of Malvern Hill. Our sketch represents the position of part of the Federal army at ten o'clock in the morning, just as the battle was commencing. The baggage train is in the foreground, and the enemy is advancing upon the Federal lines, and covering the advance with a heavy shower of shells. Willis Church is on the left of the illustration, being what most of the Southern places of worship were, mere wooden barns." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Willis Church

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged…