"As the mummy of the dead was placed in a barge to be taken across the Lake of the Dead-for it was the manner of the Egyptians to bear the bodies about to be entombed across the water to the place of the sepulture-the members of the household, especially the women, were wont to follow in another barge, and with uplifted hands and unbound hair to cry out for the lost."—Ridpath, 1885

Funeral Procession Crossing the Lake of the Dead

"As the mummy of the dead was placed in a barge to be taken across the Lake of the Dead-for it was the…

"Showing Furrow Method of Irrigating Potatoes. The arrows indicate the direction taken by the capillary water."—The Federal Digest, 1921

Furrow Method

"Showing Furrow Method of Irrigating Potatoes. The arrows indicate the direction taken by the capillary…

A Galley is a low, flat-built vessel furnished with one deck.It was primarily employed by the Romans, Genoese, Pisans, and Venetians.

The Venetian galley was generally three-masted, and was usually around 160 feet long, 32 feet broad, and supplied with sixty-four oars, to each of which were chained six or seven slaves. Such galleys were equipped with powerful rams used for boarding and sinking enemy ships. Criminals in France and elsewhere were frequently condemned to serve at the oars in these craft. In modern speech, the term "galley" refers the common kitchen of a ship.

Galley (ship)

A Galley is a low, flat-built vessel furnished with one deck.It was primarily employed by the Romans,…

Also known as a Solan Goose (Sula bassana), the Gannet is a large marine bird which nests in scattered localities in most parts of the world. Its specific name refers to the fact that it has long been a denizen of Bass Rock -- a famous craggy islet on the coast of England. This bird also nests on Bird Rock in the gulf of St. Lawrence, and other species exist in the tropics. It belongs to the same sub-order as the cormorant, and may be recognized by the fact that, as in the latter, all four toes are united by a web. 

Its bill is long, strong, and compressed to a point. In adult life, the plumage is white, save for the black primaries and a buff patch on the head or neck; the young are dusky, and do not acquire the white plumage until their sixth year. Their nests contain only one egg.

Gannet

Also known as a Solan Goose (Sula bassana), the Gannet is a large marine bird which nests in scattered…

A gargoyle on the 13th century cathedral, La Sainte-Chapel in Paris, France, an example of Gothic architecture.

Gothic Gargoyle

A gargoyle on the 13th century cathedral, La Sainte-Chapel in Paris, France, an example of Gothic architecture.

"If it be required to separate the helium which is often found in the gases given off by a thermal spring, they are subjected to the action of charcoal cooled with liquid air. The result is the absoption of the less volatile constituents, i.e., all except hydrogen and helium. The gaseous residue, with the additon of oxygen is then sparked, and the water thus formed is removed together with the excess oxygen to leave only helium." —The Encyclopedia Britannica 1910

Apparatus Used to Seperate Volatile Gases

"If it be required to separate the helium which is often found in the gases given off by a thermal spring,…

An instrument used to measure the quantity of a rain which falls at a given place. They are which falls at a given place. They are variously constructed. A convenient form (shown in figure) consists of a cylindrical tube of copper, with a funnel at the top where the rain enters. Connected with the cylinder at the lowest part is a glass tube with an attached scale.

Rain Gauge

An instrument used to measure the quantity of a rain which falls at a given place. They are which falls…

Geirrod the giant's daughter pours a pitcher of water into a stream. Thor and Loki are wading through it until it starts becoming deeper. Thor throws a stone near her to scare her away.

Geirrod's Daughter Pouring Water

Geirrod the giant's daughter pours a pitcher of water into a stream. Thor and Loki are wading through…

Geysers are boiling springs which, at intervals more or less regular, shoot out huge columns of water with great violence.

Geyser in Eruption

Geysers are boiling springs which, at intervals more or less regular, shoot out huge columns of water…

Gulliver trying to get to shore after his shipwreck.

Giant in the Sea

Gulliver trying to get to shore after his shipwreck.

This illustration shows the gills (breathing apparatus) of a perch, as well as the specific veins and arteries running along the branchial arch.

Gills (Branchial Arch of Perch)

This illustration shows the gills (breathing apparatus) of a perch, as well as the specific veins and…

This illustration shows the thorax of a crayfish with a portion of the carapace removed to show the gills.

Gills (Crayfish)

This illustration shows the thorax of a crayfish with a portion of the carapace removed to show the…

This illustration shows a transverse section of a worm with external gills. Gills are the breathing organs of aquatic animals.

Gills (worm)

This illustration shows a transverse section of a worm with external gills. Gills are the breathing…

A gimbals is a contrivance designed to keep a marine compass, chronometer, lamp, or other instrument in the horizontal position on board ship, notwithstanding the rolling and pitching of the vessel. The instrument is suspended in the diametral axis of a ring, which is again suspended in the diametral axis of another ring, the two axes being at right angles to one another.
This illustration shows a gimbal joint.

Gimbals (Joint)

A gimbals is a contrivance designed to keep a marine compass, chronometer, lamp, or other instrument…

A girl looking at her reflection in the water.

Girl

A girl looking at her reflection in the water.

A backwoods girl

Girl

A backwoods girl

An illustration of a girl drinking from a cup.

Girl Drinking From Cup

An illustration of a girl drinking from a cup.

An illustration of a girl heating water in the stove in a tea kettle.

Girl Heating Water in Tea Kettle

An illustration of a girl heating water in the stove in a tea kettle.

A girl standing in the ocean crying while a crab looks at her.

Girl in Ocean

A girl standing in the ocean crying while a crab looks at her.

A little girl sitting in a hamock above water looking at a frog.

Girl Sitting In A Hamock

A little girl sitting in a hamock above water looking at a frog.

An illustration of a young girl watering a field of tulips.

Girl Watering Field of Tulips

An illustration of a young girl watering a field of tulips.

Girl outside with ducks

Girl with Ducks

Girl outside with ducks

Fisherman turned sea-god

Glaucus

Fisherman turned sea-god

"Suppose a to be a gravel hill, and b a strata of clay or rock, impervious to water. The fluid percolating through the gravel would reach the impervious strata, along which it would run until it found an outlet at c at the foot of the hill, where a spring would be formed." — Wells, 1857

Gravel Hill

"Suppose a to be a gravel hill, and b a strata of clay or rock, impervious to water. The fluid percolating…

The Great Crested Grebe (Lophæthyia cristata) is a fresh-water, migratory, diving bird of the family Podicipidæ. It has a duck-like body, brownish and white plumage, long neck, short wings, no tail, and large, flattened toes furnished with lobate membranes serving the purpose of webs. Most of its life is spent in fresh water  lakes and ponds, but in winter and during migration, it often resorts to the sea. It is an excellent diver. The nest is made of rushes and other aquatic plants and usually floats on the water, being loosely anchored to weeds and grass. It is found in nearly all parts of Europe and Asia.

Great Crested Grebe

The Great Crested Grebe (Lophæthyia cristata) is a fresh-water, migratory, diving bird of the family…

An outdoor scene

Great Outdoors

An outdoor scene

"In this foot each toe is provided with its swimming membrane; the membrane being closed when the foot is flexed, and expanded when the foot is extended."—Pettigrew, 1874

Foot of Grebe

"In this foot each toe is provided with its swimming membrane; the membrane being closed when the foot…

Also known as the horned grebe, dipper, water-witch, and hell-diver, the sclavonian grebe is common to both Europe and North America.

Sclavonian Grebe

Also known as the horned grebe, dipper, water-witch, and hell-diver, the sclavonian grebe is common…

An illustration of a group consisting of three females and one male playing in water.

Group Playing in Water

An illustration of a group consisting of three females and one male playing in water.

"Shows the twisted levers or screws formed by the wings of the gull."—Pettigrew, 1874

Sea Gull

"Shows the twisted levers or screws formed by the wings of the gull."—Pettigrew, 1874

"for an angel of the Lord went down at certain seasons into the pool, and troubled the water: whosoever then first after the troubling of the waters stepped in was made whole, with whatsoever disease he was holden. And a certain man was there, who had been thirty and eight years in his infirmity. When Jesus saw him lying, and knew that he had been now a long time in that case, he saith unto him, Wouldest thou be made whole?" John 5:4-6 ASV
<p>Illustration of Jesus healing a man in one of the five porches at the pool at Bethesda. The lame man is reclining and Jesus is praying over him. Several men, including disciples, stand around and watch the healing. On the other side of a wall, the pool is visible and an angel is hovering over it and reaching a staff down into the waters. A woman with a child waits near the pool. A man walking with crutches wades into the pool. A woman places a baby into the pool in the background.

Jesus Heals a Paralytic Man at the Pool at Bethesda While an Angel Troubles the Waters

"for an angel of the Lord went down at certain seasons into the pool, and troubled the water: whosoever…

"Hero's Machine. The generation of steam from water by the application of heat, and the mechanical force produced by this means, appear to have been understood at a very remote period; but their application to machinery devoted to the purposes of locomotion, is a discovery of recent date. The ingenious contrivances of early discoverers were devoted to objects of minor importance, as those of raising water and propelling smoke upwards." —Comstock, 1850

Hero's Machine

"Hero's Machine. The generation of steam from water by the application of heat, and the mechanical force…

"Hotbeds may be heated by means of either steam or hot water. They can be piped from the heater in a dwelling-house or greenhouse." &mdash; Baily, 1898

Pipe-heated hotbed

"Hotbeds may be heated by means of either steam or hot water. They can be piped from the heater in a…

A house set on the side of a lake.

Lakeside house

A house set on the side of a lake.

"An instrument called the hydrostatic bellows, also shows, in a striking manner, the great force of a small quantity of water, pressing in a perpendicular direction. This instrument consists of two boards, connected together with strong leather, in the manner of the common bellows. It is then furnished with a tube a, which communicated between the two boards. A person standing on the upper board may raise himself up by pouring water into the tube. If the tube holds an ounce of water, and has an area equal to a thousandth part of the area of the top of the bellows, one ounce of water in the tube will balance a thousand ounces placed on the bellows." &mdash;Comstock, 1850

Hydraulic Bellows

"An instrument called the hydrostatic bellows, also shows, in a striking manner, the great force of…

"The hydraulic ram uses alternating water pressure, air pressure, and suction to provide a steady stream of water through the delivery pipe, e." &mdash;Hallock 1905

Hydraulic Water Ram

"The hydraulic ram uses alternating water pressure, air pressure, and suction to provide a steady stream…

"Pumps water in bursts. Water enters pipe B and is forced into D then up the tube F. Any excess water in tube B exits through E." &mdash;Quackenbos 1859

Hydraulic Ram

"Pumps water in bursts. Water enters pipe B and is forced into D then up the tube F. Any excess water…

"Water jaw, <em>Hydria</em>" &mdash; The Delphian Society, 1913

Hydria

"Water jaw, Hydria" — The Delphian Society, 1913

"Water-jaw, <em>Hydria</em>." &mdash; The Delphian Society, 1913

Hydria

"Water-jaw, Hydria." — The Delphian Society, 1913

The Greek Hydria is used as a water-pot to carry water with from springs. Maidens carried it on their heads vertically when full and horizontally when empty.

Greek Hydria

The Greek Hydria is used as a water-pot to carry water with from springs. Maidens carried it on their…

This Greek Hydria has a Kalpis form that is smooth and painted in black and red figures on the shoulder. It is used as a water-pot to carry water from springs.

Greek Hydria

This Greek Hydria has a Kalpis form that is smooth and painted in black and red figures on the shoulder.…

This Greek Hydria is painted in black, reddish brown and white. Decorated of the highest class, the shoulder is decorated with an ivy band. It is used as a water-pot to carry water.

Greek Hydria

This Greek Hydria is painted in black, reddish brown and white. Decorated of the highest class, the…

"A mountain and spring, showing how the principle of the syphon operates to produce the effect described. Suppose there is a crevice, or hollow in the rock from a to b, and a narrow fissure leading from it, in the form of the syphon, b c. The water from the rill fe, filling the hollow, up to the line a d, it will then discharge itself through the syphon, and continue to run until the water is exhausted down to the l g of the syphon b, when it will cease. Then the water from the rills continuing to run until the hollow is again filled up to the same line, the syphon again begins to act, and again discharges the contents of the reservoir as before, and thus the spring p, at one moment flows with great violence and the next moment ceases entirely." —Comstock, 1850

Intermitting Spring

"A mountain and spring, showing how the principle of the syphon operates to produce the effect described.…

Diagram illustrating an irrigation system.

Irrigation system

Diagram illustrating an irrigation system.

"And Jehovah prepared a great fish to swallow up Jonah; and Jonah was in the belly of the fish three days and three nights." Jonah 1:17 ASV
<p>Illustration of Jonah, looking up towards the sky, as he is swallowed by an enormous fish. The fishes scales, fins, and tail can be seen thrashing in the waves. Some shells are pictured in front of Jonah (bottom left).

Jonah is Swallowed by a Great Fish Sent by God

"And Jehovah prepared a great fish to swallow up Jonah; and Jonah was in the belly of the fish three…

Juncus acutiflorus belongs to a genus of grass-like herbs (Juncus) that grow in boggy places.

Juncus Acutiflorus

Juncus acutiflorus belongs to a genus of grass-like herbs (Juncus) that grow in boggy places.

Juncus compressus belongs to a genus of grass-like herbs (Juncus) that grow in boggy places.

Juncus Compressus

Juncus compressus belongs to a genus of grass-like herbs (Juncus) that grow in boggy places.

Juncus conglomeratus, also known as the common rush, belongs to a genus of grass-like herbs (Juncus) that grow in boggy places. It is the best known species, with cylindrical stems and crowded panicles of flowers below the tapered extremities of the stems.

Juncus Conglomeratus

Juncus conglomeratus, also known as the common rush, belongs to a genus of grass-like herbs (Juncus)…

Known as the soft rush, Juncus effusus is nearly as common as the most common species, J. conglomeratus. It can be distinguished from J. conglomeratus by its branching and looser inflorescence. It belongs to a genus of grass-like herbs (Juncus) that grow in boggy places.

Juncus Effusus

Known as the soft rush, Juncus effusus is nearly as common as the most common species, J. conglomeratus.…

Juncus glaucus belongs to a genus of grass-like herbs (Juncus) that grow in boggy places.

Juncus Glaucus

Juncus glaucus belongs to a genus of grass-like herbs (Juncus) that grow in boggy places.

The Egyptian Krater is an antique vase that has a lotus cup design. Typically used for mixing water and wine.

Egyptian Krater

The Egyptian Krater is an antique vase that has a lotus cup design. Typically used for mixing water…

This Egyptian Krater is an antique vase that was found in Thebes, Ancient Egypt during the eighteenth dynasty. Typically used for mixing water and wine.

Egyptian Krater

This Egyptian Krater is an antique vase that was found in Thebes, Ancient Egypt during the eighteenth…

An image of a lake in a town.

Lake

An image of a lake in a town.

"So when he had washed their feet, and taken his garments, and sat down again, he said unto them, Know ye what I have done to you?" John 13:12 ASV
<p>Illustration of Jesus, kneeling at his disciples' feet, washing them over a basin. The disciples hands are open in a questioning gesture. Other disciples sit at the banquet table and watch the scene. Judas looms in the shadows in the background. Arched windows and drapery decorate the room.

Jesus Washes the Disciples' Feet to Show the Importance of Baptism and Penance

"So when he had washed their feet, and taken his garments, and sat down again, he said unto them, Know…

"Then he poureth water into the basin, and began to wash the disciples' feet, and to wipe them with the towel wherewith he was girded." John 13:5 ASV
<p>Illustration of Jesus kneeling, washing the foot of one of his disciples. The other disciples sit and stand around the table, watching Jesus. The disciple's foot is on a raised stool and a basin sits nearby. One disciple, perhaps Judas, is depicted in shadows in the back left of the illustration.

Jesus Washes the Feet of His Twelve Disciples after the Last Supper

"Then he poureth water into the basin, and began to wash the disciples' feet, and to wipe them with…

Lattice Leaf is the popular name of a water plant, 'Aponogeton jenestralis', belonging to the order 'Aponogetonaceæ'. The older leaves are of open structure, are nearly a foot long, oblong in shape, and float just below the surface of the water. The flowers are born in spikes in the surface. The roots of the plant are used as an article of food by the natives of Madagascar, where it is indigenous.
(1. Part of Flower Spike)

Lattice Leaf

Lattice Leaf is the popular name of a water plant, 'Aponogeton jenestralis', belonging to the order…

A lemming is a small, yellowish-brown rodent, closely related to the vole, and belonging to the genus Myodes. The Norwegian lemming (M. lemmus) is about five inches in length, with the tail extremely short. It excavates shallow burrows in the soil of the mountain meadows in which it lives, and in winter tunnels beneath the snow for its food, which is wholly vegetable, consisting of roots, shoots, catkins, moss, and lichens. Special interest attaches to this rodent from the fact that at irregular intervals, varying from five to twenty years, it suddenly appears in vast numbers in Northern Europe; great bodies, said to number millions of individuals, migrate from place to place in search of food, leaving behind them a track of desolation as they eat their way through fields of corn and grass. They show a remarkable persistency both in the act of migration and in the general direction of the movement, and swim without hesitation any bodies of water which may block their path. As, from the contour of the Scandinavian peninsula, they inevitably come eventually to the sea, those which have not perished from overcrowding, from disease, or from the attacks of their enemies, die in attempting to swim across it. The lemming of Northern Europe is known is replaced in North America by the allied M. obensis and the banded lemming (Cuniculus torquatus); the latter is circumpolar, and turns white in winter. Other allies, called lemming-mice, inhabit Northwestern Canada, and have somewhat similar habits, but rarely, if ever, migrate from their habitat.

Lemming

A lemming is a small, yellowish-brown rodent, closely related to the vole, and belonging to the genus…

This illustration shows a lentil plant. Lentils are the round, flat seeds of a small leguminous plant <i>(Vicia (Lens) hirsuta)</i>, of which numerous varieties are cultivated in the countries bordering the Mediterranean and elsewhere. The seeds are highly nitrogenous, and of great food value. They form the principal constituent of the well-known <i>Revalenta arabica</i> of commerce. They consist of -- starch, 50 percent; casein, 24 percent; fat, 2 percent; and water, 14 percent. The dark green German lentils are much more palatable than the reddish-yellow Egyptian variety.

The Lentil Plant

This illustration shows a lentil plant. Lentils are the round, flat seeds of a small leguminous plant…

A type of Ganoid fish. This particular species is a gar-pike.

Lepidosteus Occeus

A type of Ganoid fish. This particular species is a gar-pike.

The Liberty Bell above the shore.

Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell above the shore.