First Governor of West Virginia

Arthur J. Boreman

First Governor of West Virginia

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." —Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." —Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." —Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

The town of Harper's Ferry, where an important Civil War battle was fought in 1862.

View of Harper's Ferry, 1862, Looking South

The town of Harper's Ferry, where an important Civil War battle was fought in 1862.

The burning of the arsenal in Harper's Ferry during the American Civil War

Burning of the Arsenal at Harper's Ferry

The burning of the arsenal in Harper's Ferry during the American Civil War

Harpers Ferry is a historic town in Jefferson County, West Virginia. It is located at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers where the United States of Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia meet. It is best known for John Brown's raid on the Armory in 1859 and its role in the Civil War.

Harpers Ferry

Harpers Ferry is a historic town in Jefferson County, West Virginia. It is located at the confluence…

"Landing of Federal troops at Parkersburg, Western Virginia. Parkersburg, Va., in 1861 was a thriving post village on the Ohio River, situated at the mouth of the Little Kanawha River, and altogether presented a most picturesque appearance, the houses being very neatly built and well placed. It is about one hundred miles from Wheeling and two hundred and fifty-eight miles from Richmond in a direct W.N.W. line. It contained a courthouse, churches of several denominations, a bank, a printing office and several steam mills. Its population was nearly four thousand. It has excellent turnpike roads to Staunton and Winchester and the Northwestern branch of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad terminates here. Our view represents the arrival of Federal troops previous to the total clearance of the Kanawha Valley from the presence of Wise and his Confederate troops." —Leslie, 1896

Landing at Parkersburg

"Landing of Federal troops at Parkersburg, Western Virginia. Parkersburg, Va., in 1861 was a thriving…

The official U.S. state seal of West Virginia.

Seal of West Virginia

The official U.S. state seal of West Virginia.

The state banner of West Virginia, the panhandle state.

West Virginia

The state banner of West Virginia, the panhandle state.

The official seal of the U.S. state of West Virginia in 1889.

West Virginia

The official seal of the U.S. state of West Virginia in 1889.

Seal of the state of West Virginia, 1876

West Virginia Seal

Seal of the state of West Virginia, 1876

Seal of the state of West Virginia, 1904

West Virginia seal

Seal of the state of West Virginia, 1904