"Christ Driving Out the Money-Changers. By Albrecht Dürer. From the 'Little Passions.' Printed from a cast of the original wood-block in the British Museum." -Heath, 1901

Christ Driving Out the Money-Changers

"Christ Driving Out the Money-Changers. By Albrecht Dürer. From the 'Little Passions.' Printed…

Jockey running toward right.

Jockey

Jockey running toward right.

An illustration of a man in a top hat holding a whip.

Man in Top Hat

An illustration of a man in a top hat holding a whip.

A frame of wood erected on a post or pole, with movable boards resembling those in the stocks, and the holes which were put the head and hands of an offender, which was thus exposed to public derision.

Pillory

A frame of wood erected on a post or pole, with movable boards resembling those in the stocks, and the…

"The Furies are generally represented with a scourge, with which to punish the wicked in Tartarus. It probably was supposed to resemble the whip used for punishing slaves, which was a dreaedful instrument, knotted with bones or heavy indented circles of bronze, or terminated by hooks, in which latter case it was aptly denominated a scorpion." — Anthon, 1891

Scourge

"The Furies are generally represented with a scourge, with which to punish the wicked in Tartarus. It…

An illustration of a teacher wearing a hat and robe whipping a young pupil with a branch.

Teacher Whipping Boy with Swatches

An illustration of a teacher wearing a hat and robe whipping a young pupil with a branch.

To graft two plants together using the tongue or whip grafting approach, you must first make a sloping cut in the rootstock with a 'tongue' pointing up. Next you must make a matching cut in the scion wood with a 'tongue' pointing downwards. Finally you join the two, ensuring maximum contact of the cambium layers. Bind with rafia or polythene tape and seal with grafting wax.

Tongue Grafting

To graft two plants together using the tongue or whip grafting approach, you must first make a sloping…

An Indian whip with decorative handle.

Indian Whip

An Indian whip with decorative handle.

"Whip-grafting or tongue-grafting is the most usual mode of performing the operation. The stock is headed off by an oblique transverse cut as shown at a, a slice is then pared off the side as at b, and on the face of this a tongue or notch is made, the cut being in a downward direction; the scion c is pared off in a similar way by a single clean sharp cut, and this is notched or tongued in the opposite direction as the figure indicates, the two are then fitted together as shown at d, so that the inner bark of each may come in contact at least on one side, and then tied round with damp soft bast as at c; next some grafting clay is taken on the forefinger and pushed down on each side so as to fill out the space between the top of the stock and the graft, and a portion is also rubbed over the ligatures on the side where the graft is placed." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Whip-Grafting

"Whip-grafting or tongue-grafting is the most usual mode of performing the operation. The stock is headed…

The Whip-poor-will or whippoorwill, Caprimulgus vociferus, is a medium-sized (22-27 cm) nightjar from North and Central America. The Whip-poor-will is commonly heard within its range, but less often seen. It is named onomatopoeically after its call. This bird is sometimes confused[1] with the related Chuck-will's-widow (Caprimulgus carolinensis) which has a similar but lower-pitched and slower call. Adults have mottled plumage: the upperparts are grey, black and brown; the lower parts are grey and black. They have a very short bill and a black throat. Males have a white patch below the throat and white tips on the outer tail feathers; in the female, these parts are light brown.

Whip-poor-will

The Whip-poor-will or whippoorwill, Caprimulgus vociferus, is a medium-sized (22-27 cm) nightjar from…