Shows empty rural area, with a column of troops moving over a bridge.

Battlefield of Antietam

Shows empty rural area, with a column of troops moving over a bridge.

Union forces crossing a river.

Sherman's March to the Sea

Union forces crossing a river.

A statue by Daniel C. French at Concord Bridge.

The Concord Minute Man

A statue by Daniel C. French at Concord Bridge.

Suspension bridge.

Bridge, Suspension

Suspension bridge.

Swing bridge.

Brdige, Swing

Swing bridge.

Cantilever with suspended span.

Bridge, Cantileaver with Suspension Span

Cantilever with suspended span.

Platt Truss.

Bridge, Platt Truss

Platt Truss.

Vertical Lift Bridge

Bridge, Vertical Lift

Vertical Lift Bridge

Bridge, Scherzer Single-Leaf Bascule Bridge

Bridge, Scherzer Single-Leaf Bascule Bridge

Bridge, Scherzer Single-Leaf Bascule Bridge

Strauss Heel-trunnion Bascule Bridge

Bridge, Strauss Heel-trunnion Bascule

Strauss Heel-trunnion Bascule Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge between New York and Brooklyn.

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge between New York and Brooklyn.

The New East River Bridge is located in New York. It is often called the Brooklyn Bridge. It is the largest suspension bridge in the world.

New East River Bridge, NY

The New East River Bridge is located in New York. It is often called the Brooklyn Bridge. It is the…

A steel arch bridge erected in 1874 and costed around one million dollars. Crosses over the Mississippi in St. Louis. Each arch is at least 500 feet in length.

Eads Bridge

A steel arch bridge erected in 1874 and costed around one million dollars. Crosses over the Mississippi…

Steel tower bridge across the East River in New York.

Steel Bridge

Steel tower bridge across the East River in New York.

The suspension-bridge over the strait called the East river, which seperates New York and Brooklyn was completed and formally opened on May 24th 1883.

East River Bridge

The suspension-bridge over the strait called the East river, which seperates New York and Brooklyn was…

The chevet of Notre Dame viewed from the shore line.

Chevet of Notre Dame

The chevet of Notre Dame viewed from the shore line.

"The army of General Fremont on its march up the Shenandoah Valley- wounded and ragged soldiers. Fremont crossed the mountains with as little delay as was practicable, and through heavy roads reached Strasburg just after Jackson had passed through it. There he was joined the following morning by General Bayard, who brought with him the vanguard of Shields's cavalry, and, without waiting for re-enforcements or to afford the fatigued troops their much-needed rest, they immediately started in pursuit of Jackson. They shortly after overtook his rear, with which they had a slight skirmish, and followed close upon the retreating force, until their advance was checked by the burning of the Mount Jackson bridge." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Shenandoah Valley

"The army of General Fremont on its march up the Shenandoah Valley- wounded and ragged soldiers. Fremont…

"Desperate skirmish at Old Church, near Tunstall's Station, VA., between a squadron of the Fifth United States Cavalry and Stuart's Confederate Cavalry, June 13th, 1862- death of the Confederate Captain Latane. The Confederate cavalry raid was first to Old Church, where they had a skirmish with a squadron of the Fifth United States Cavalry, who gallantly cut their way through the greatly superior numbers of the enemy, killing a Confederate captain. The Confederates then proceeded to Garlick's Landing, on the Pamunkey River, and only four miles from the White House; thence to Baltimore Crossroads, near New Kent Courthouse, on their way to Richmond, which they reached by crossing the Chickahominy, between Bottom's Bridge and James River."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Old Church

"Desperate skirmish at Old Church, near Tunstall's Station, VA., between a squadron of the Fifth United…

"Skirmishing between the pickets of the two armies near Munson's Hill- the hill in the distance. Munson's Hill is about five miles from the Chain Bridge, on the northern side of the Leesburg Turnpike, about one mile from Bailey's Crossroads, where our pickets were stationed, and about three miles this side of Falls Church, which was in full possession of the enemy. In this neighborhood they had strong pickets, which frequently came into collision with those sent out upon the Federal side from Ball's Roads." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Munson's Hill

"Skirmishing between the pickets of the two armies near Munson's Hill- the hill in the distance. Munson's…

"General Fremont's Division crossing the Pontoon Bridge over the Shenandoah River in pursuit of the Confederate General Jackson and his army." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Pontoon bridge

"General Fremont's Division crossing the Pontoon Bridge over the Shenandoah River in pursuit of the…

"Engagement between the Federal troops and the Confederates on the Virginia side of the Potomac, opposite Edward's Ferry, October 22nd, 1861- battery of Parrott Guns on the Maryland shore. Early in the evening the news of the death of Colonel Baker, and of the presence of an overwhelming Confederate force on the opposite bank, reached Edward's Ferry, and at once orders were given for bringing back to the Maryland shore the troops which had been passed in the scows, etc., during the day. This was effected by the same means, occupying until midnight. At this time word was received at Edward's Ferry that General Banks was approaching with his column to support the movement of the day, and immediately the same troops, which had crossed and recrossed, were again sent across the river in the same scows. Give hundred feet of fortifications were thrown up to support the lodgment, with only a slight brush with a detachment of Confederates, in which General Lander was wounded. During the night, Tuesday, October 22nd, the full epressing news of Baker's disaster became known, and the whistle of the Leesburg railway, bringing up Confederate re-enforcements from Manassas, sounded constantly in the ears of the Federals. On Tuesday morning, however, General McClellan had arrived at Edward's Ferry, and both with reference to further advance or a retreat, as circumstances might justify or require, ordered a bridge of boats to be thrown across the river. He, however, received such intelligence on Wednesday of the number and designs of the Confederates, that he resolved to withdraw the Federal forces from the Virginia side, which was effected silently and safely on the same night. Our engraving illustrates the position of the Federal troops on the Virginia shore, on Tuesday, during the attack in which General Lander was wounded." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle at Potomac

"Engagement between the Federal troops and the Confederates on the Virginia side of the Potomac, opposite…

"Engagement at Romney, VA., twenty miles from New Creek, Tuesday, June 11th, 1861- the Eleventh Indiana Zouaves crossing the bridge over the Potomac, at double quick time, to attack the Confederate forces. On Tuesday, June 11th, 1861, Colonel Lewis Wallace, in command of the Eleventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Zouaves, stationed at Cumberland, Md., received orders to attack the Confederates assembled at Romney, the capital of Hampshire County, Va. He took six hundred men and left the same evening, reaching New Creek Bridge, twenty-eight miles by rail from Cumberland, at eleven o'clock P.M. Colonel Wallace reached the neighborhood of Romney about eight o'clock A.M., and was not surprised to find that the enemy had got the alarm, there having been time enough for horsemen to give warning. Picket guards had been placed on the eights commanding the road, at a distance of about one mile and a half from the town. These fired their pieces at the advance of the Zouaves, and as the fire was promptly and effectually returned, they immediately withdrew. The Zouaves entered Romney at half-past eight o'clock A.M., in time to partake of the breakfast which had been prepared for the "evacuates."" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Engagement at Romney

"Engagement at Romney, VA., twenty miles from New Creek, Tuesday, June 11th, 1861- the Eleventh Indiana…

"Colonel Pilson's Battery shelling the rear guard of the Confederate General Jackson's Army, at the Crossing of the Shenandoah River, Tuesday, June 3rd, 1862. As soon as colonel Pilson could bring up his guns they were unlimbered on either side of the road and opened on the Confederate batteries. Beyond the river stretched a broad plain, the further end of which sloped gradually up into an irregular eminence, along which the enemy had placed its artillery on its further side, and in the neighboring woods its troops were quietly encamped, out of range, and with the Shenandoah River in their rear were safe for the night, as they supposed. It was soon found that the distance was too great for the guns. Colonel Albert, chief of staff, was in advance, and reconnoitring the position, with a soldier's eye saw that the river bent suddenly half a mile beyond the bridge, and sent Schirmer's battery to a hill on this side, which flanked the confederate camp, and at once forced them to withdraw to a more secure position." —Leslie, 1896

Crossing of Shenandoah River

"Colonel Pilson's Battery shelling the rear guard of the Confederate General Jackson's Army, at the…

"Advance of the Federal troops, near Howard's Bridge and Mill, four miles from Big Bethel, on the road to Yorktown." —Leslie, 1896

Howard's Bridge and Mill

"Advance of the Federal troops, near Howard's Bridge and Mill, four miles from Big Bethel, on the road…

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged with the enemy. This desperate battle between the Confederates on one hand and the divisions of General Heintzelman and Franklin on the other was fought on the morning of Monday, June 30th, 1862, at Willis Church, a place midway between the White Oak Swamp Bridge and Turkey Bend, where, later in the day, another fierce fight raged, the week of combat being closed next day by the deadly but drawn battle of Malvern Hill. Our sketch represents the position of part of the Federal army at ten o'clock in the morning, just as the battle was commencing. The baggage train is in the foreground, and the enemy is advancing upon the Federal lines, and covering the advance with a heavy shower of shells. Willis Church is on the left of the illustration, being what most of the Southern places of worship were, mere wooden barns." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Willis Church

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged…

"The Bouquet Battery, commanding the viaduct over the Patapsco River, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, near the Relay House, in 1861. The Relay House was a small railroad station about seven miles from Baltimore, on the Northern Central Railroad. It was of small population and trade, but its position elevated it into considerable importance. Immediately after the troubles in Baltimore this position was seized upon, and General Butler made it his headquarters, and by so doing not only held the control of the railrod to Harper's Ferry and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and Patapsco River, but threatened the city of Baltimore with a strong military force. The Relay House was romantically situated in a country of exquisite natural beauty. Our sketch shows the battery stationed to command the viaduct, with the Relay House in the distance." —Leslie, 1896

Bouquet Battery

"The Bouquet Battery, commanding the viaduct over the Patapsco River, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad,…

"Rebuilding of the railroad bridge over the Rappahannock to Fredericksburg, burnt by the Confederates in their retreat from Falmouth, April 19th, 1862. On April 17th, 1862, General McDowell, with his division of the Federal army, arrived on the banks of the Rappahannock, the Confederates retreating and burning the bridge which connected Falmouth with Fredericksburg. The city capitulated the next day. Our artist wrote, "I send you a sketch of the rebuilding of the railroad bridge across the Rappahannock. The rapidity with which our Northern men rebuilt the burnt bridge, and the strength and excellence of the work, caused the astonishment of the inhabitants of the city. The supports are made of pine logs cut from the adjacent forest, and the time occupied in putting the structure over was about six days."" —Leslie, 1896

Rappahannock bridge

"Rebuilding of the railroad bridge over the Rappahannock to Fredericksburg, burnt by the Confederates…

"Successful retreat of the Federal troops from the Virginia shore across a canal-boat bridge at Edward's Ferry, on the night of October 23rd, 1861. Of the 1,900 Federals who crossed the river in the morning but a sad remnant reached the island and opposite shore on that awful night. Upward of 500 were taken prisoners; more than 100 were drowned; nearly the same number were killed on the field or shot in the retreat, and upward of 200 were wounded. We shrink from detailing all the incidents of horror which marked this most disastrous action and retreat. It was a fearful blunder from beginning to end. Our illustration represents the successful retreat to the Maryland shore on the night of Wednesday, October 23rd, by moonlight, during a high, cold windstorm." —Leslie, 1896

Edward's Ferry

"Successful retreat of the Federal troops from the Virginia shore across a canal-boat bridge at Edward's…

"In the Shenandoah Valley- General Fremont's division marching through the woods to attack the Confederates. This exciting pursuit commenced on Saturday, May 31st, 1862, when the first collision occurred between the hostile armies in the lower valley, near Strasburg, to which place Jackson had fallen back from the Potomac upon hearing that Fremont was on the march to intercept him. In this retreat the indomitable and daring Ashby, the "Murat of the Confederates," occupied the post of danger, dashing against the Federal troops whenever they pressed the retreating enemy too closely. At ten o'clock on the 31st the First Jersey Cavalry, led by the gallant Wyndham, and Ashby's men had a desperate skirmish, in which the Confederates were driven back with some loss. Jackson rested his Confederate troops in Strasburg this night, and next morning resumed his retreat, when the Ashby cavalry and the First Jersey had another and heavier conflict, in which artillery was used. That night the enemy occupied Woodstock, having made fourteen miles in their retreat this day. So close was the Federal advance on the Confederates that General Bayard's cavalry, when they entered Strasburg, captured the Confederate provost marshal and two hundred men. At the village of Edinburgh, five miles from Woodstock, the Confederate General Ashby, by Jackson's orders, after seeing the rear guard safely across the bridge over Stony Creek, fired the wooden structure, and it was soon enveloped in flames." —Leslie, 1896

Strasburg woods

"In the Shenandoah Valley- General Fremont's division marching through the woods to attack the Confederates.…

"View of New Berne, N. C., from the interior of Fort Thompson after its capture by the Federal forces- burning of Rosin Works, railway bridge and naval stores, and showing vessels sunk in the channel of the Neuse River, to prevent the approach of Federal gunboats. Captain Rowan, in his account of the doings of his gunboats, after modestly narrating the important services he rendered General Burnside the day previous in the debarkation of the land forces, thus recounts his own separate share of the expedition to New Berne: "At 6:30 A.M. on Friday, April 14th, 1862, the fleet steadily moved up and gradually closed in toward the batteries. The lower fortification was discovered to have been abandoned by the enemy. A boat was dispatched to it, and the Stars and Stripes planted on the ramparts. As we advanced the upper batteries opened fire upon us. The fire was returned with effect, the magazine of one exploding. Having proceeded in an extended line as far as the obstructions in the river would permit, the signal was made to follow movements of the flagship, and the whole fleet advanced in order, concentating our fire on Fort Thompson, mounting 13 guns, on which rested the enemy's land defenses. The army having with great gallantry driven them out of these defenses, the fort was abandoned."" —Leslie, 1896

Fort Thompson

"View of New Berne, N. C., from the interior of Fort Thompson after its capture by the Federal forces-…

"Burning of the gunpowder Creek Railroad Bridge, on the Philadelphia and Baltimore Railroad, by the Maryland Secessionists." —Leslie, 1896

Creek Railroad Bridge

"Burning of the gunpowder Creek Railroad Bridge, on the Philadelphia and Baltimore Railroad, by the…

"Battle of Savages Station. Brigadier General Smith's division hotly engaged with the enemy, at noon, June 28th, 1862. Our correspondent described this battle as follows: "Having left our wounded, about thirteen hundred men, in the hospital, to the tender mercies of the Confederates, our troops fell back at daybreak on Sunday from their line of entrenchments. This extended from a space of white oak swamp, near Richmond, to the Chickahominy Creek, at New Bridge. The divisions of Hooker, Kearney and Sedgwick were thrown into the woods, where a number of batteries were masked to oppose the enemy, who, advancing cautiously, clambered over the ditches and parapets, and, seeing them abandoned, signaled the main body, who came up at double quick. Taking possession of our defenses with a cheer, they raised their flag amid loud yells of demoniacal satisfaction. Then, in close order and in line of battle, they marched down the Williamsburg Road, past the scene of the Seven Pines fight, and so approached where our troops were concealed at a point denominated Peach Orchard, being an insignificant stopping place on the railroad, midway between Hancocks and Savages. When they had come so close that our troops could toss a biscuit from our line into theirs, our batteries were unmasked, and an awful blaze of flame and projectile rose from the depths of the woods. Before the Confederates could rally, our men had poured a dozen volleys of musketry into them, covering the ground with the slain."" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Savages Station

"Battle of Savages Station. Brigadier General Smith's division hotly engaged with the enemy, at noon,…

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- the fight at the Licking Bridge, Cynthiana, between the Federal troops and the Morgan Confederate Guerrillas. Cynthiana, the scene of the fight between the Cincinnati volunteers and Morgan's Confederate cavalry, is the capital of Harrison County, Ky. When Morgan with his guerrilas arrived on the south side of the Licking River, on Thursday, July 17th, 1862, he found Lieutenant Colonel Landrum, of the Eighteenth Kentucky Regiment, with a hastily gathered force, ready to oppose him. The splendidly mounted Confederates were, however, too much for him, and after making a gallant defense the Confederates forced their way over the bridge, killed a number of the Federals and captured one cannon. Landrum and about forty of his troops made good their retreat to Lexington, which was in a perfect panic at the proximity of the Confederate chief." —Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Raid

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- the fight at the Licking Bridge, Cynthiana, between the Federal…

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky--excitement at Convington--gathering of armed Federal citizens at the railroad and telegraph office, on hearing of the capture of Cynthiana by the Confederate Morgan. The dash of Morgan from his mountain haunts in Tennessee through Kentucky caused considerable alarm throughout the State, for it was well planned and boldly executed. It is said to have been an inspiration from Jeff Davis himself, intended to produce a general uprising in Kentucky against the Federal Government. The people, however, soon recovered from their momentary terror; and it was then seen how much stronger the Federal sentiment was in Kentucky than that of Secession." —Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Raid Rally

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky--excitement at Convington--gathering of armed Federal citizens at…

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle of Malvern Hill commenced with the advance of a large body of Confederates, extending quite across the country, with cavalry on each flank. The Federals at once jumped up wearily, and waited their appraoch, while all the signal officers, on their several stations, waved their cabalistic muslin. The Federal column was formed with General Couch, of General Keyes's corps, on the extreme left; Franklin and Heintzelman took up the centre, and on the right were the remnants of Porter and Sumner. Burns's brigade, being ordered to charge, advanced with the sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Regiment (Irish), Colonel Owen, and being gallantly seconded by Dana's, Meagher's and French's brigades, they dashed within fifty yards of the enemy and opened a splendid fire of musketry. The left of the line was now advanced, and the troops of General Couch really behaved wonderfully, facing the enemy wherever he appeared, and pouring volleys into him all the time. After fighting two hours, with a loss of about 400, the night fell, and having moved across Turkey Island Creek, they broke up the bridge, and soon the whole army closed up at and near Harrison's Bar, twenty-seven miles from Richmond." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Malvern Hill

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of Antietam, Md. Burnside's division carrying the bridge over the Antietam Creek and storming the Confederate position, after a desperate conflict of four hours, Wednesday, September 17th, 1862. On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge, after an obstinate contest of four hours' duration and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed, and finding the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, advanced in line of battle on their new position, about half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on the advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hillin front of the enemy's batteries they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. The Federals, though terribly decimated, gave them a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Md. Burnside's division carrying the bridge over the Antietam Creek and storming…

"Bombardment and capture of Fort Thompson, thirteen guns, near New Berne, on the Neuse River, by the Federal gunboats of General Burnside's expedition, commanded by Commander S. C. Rowan, U. S. N., March 14th, 1862. Extract from the official report of General Burnside. 'Early on the morning of the 12th, the entire force started for New Berne, and that night anchored off the mouth of Slocum's Creek, some eighteen miles from New Berne, where I had decided to make a landing. The landing commenced by seven o'clock the next morning under cover of the naval fleet, and was effected with the greatest enthusiasm by the troops. After a toilsome march through the mud, the head of the column marched within a mile and a half of the enemy's stronghold at eight o'clock, a distance of twelve miles from the point of landing, where we bivouached for the night. At daylight on the morning of the 14th I ordered an advance of the whole division, and, after an engagement of four hours, we succeeded in carrying a continuous line of field-works of over a mile in length. The position was finally carried by a most gallant charge of our men, which enabled us to gain the rear of all the batteries between this point and New Berne, which was done by a rapid advance of the entire force up the main road and railroad, the naval fleet meantime pushing its way up the river, throwing their shots into the forts in front of us. The enemy, after retreating in great confusion across the railroad bridge set fire to it, thus preventing further pursuit and causing detention in occupying the town by our troops. But the naval force had arrived at the wharves and commanded the town with their guns."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Thompson

"Bombardment and capture of Fort Thompson, thirteen guns, near New Berne, on the Neuse River, by the…

"The Federal troops under Generals Brannan and Terry driving the Confederates under beauregard across the Pocotaligo bridge, near the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, October 22nd. Our correspondent thus describes the fight: 'This action began between twelve and one o'clock, and lasted about an hour, ending in the retreat of the Confederates to another position at Frampton's Plantation, which lies two miles beyond. The enemy was closely followed, and after a hotly contested fight the Confederates were driven from their well-chosen position, and two miles beyond, which brought them up to Pocotaligo Bridge, over which they crossed, taking shelter behind earthworks on the farthest side. To this point our troops nearly approached, but found further progress impossible, as the bridge had been out by the enemy on his retreat. Our loss was: Killed, 15; wounded, 106; missing, 2; total, 123.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Pocotaligo Bridge

"The Federal troops under Generals Brannan and Terry driving the Confederates under beauregard across…

"Reconnoissance by Colonel Max Weber's Turner rifles in the vicinity of Newmarket Bridge, on the road to Yorktown, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Reconnoissance

"Reconnoissance by Colonel Max Weber's Turner rifles in the vicinity of Newmarket Bridge, on the road…

"'The Forlorn Hope.' Volunteers storming party, consisting of portions of the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts crossing the Rappahannock in advance of the Grand Army, to drive off the Confederate riflemen who were firing upon the Federal pontioniers, Wednesday, December 10th, 1862. We illustrate one of those numerous acts of daring which have raised the character of the Federal soldier to the highest position in the military world. When the fire of the enemy from the rifle pits on the south side of the Rappahannock became so deadly that the pontoniers could not carry on their work, General Burnside called for 100 volunteers to cross and dislodge, at the bayonet's point, the concealed sharpshooters. Thousands sprang forward, but only the number required was chosen. These consisted of men from the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiments. With the utmost alacrity this gallant 'forlorn hope' sprang into the boats, and, on reaching the other side, drove the Confederates from their posts at the point of the bayonet, capturing 39 prisoners. Only one man was killed and give wounded in this desperate duty. The bridge was soon finished, and a sufficient force passed over to hold the town."— Frank Leslie, 1896

The Forlorn Hope

"'The Forlorn Hope.' Volunteers storming party, consisting of portions of the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth…

"The Confederate privateer steamer <em>Alabama</em> (290). Captain Raphael Semmes. Our illustration of the <em>Alabama</em> was taken from a photograph while she was at Liverpool, where she was facetiously termed the Emperor of China's yacht. The <em>Alabama</em> was built at Birkenhead; she was about 1,200 tons burden, with draught of about 14 feet; her engines built by Laird & Sons, of Birkenhead, 1862. She was a wooden vessel propelled by a screw, copper bottom, about 210 feet long, rather narrow, painted black outside and drab inside; had a round stern, billethead, very little sheer, flushed deck fore and aft; a bridge forward of the smokestack; carried two large black boats on cranes amidships forward of the main rigging; two black quarter boats between the main and mizzen masts, one small black boat over the stern on cranes; the square spars on a gallows between the bridge and foremast showed above the rail. She carried three long 32-pounders on a side, and was pierced for two more amidships; had a 100-pound rifled pivot gun forward of the bridge, and a 68-pound pivot on the main track; had tracks laid forward for a pivot bow gun, and tracks aft for a pivot stern chaser; her guns were of the Blakely pattern, and were manufactured by Wesley & Preston, Liverpool, 1862. She took her armament and crew and most of her officers on board near Terceira. Wester Islands, from an English vessel. Her commander was Raphael Semmes."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Steamer Alabama

"The Confederate privateer steamer Alabama (290). Captain Raphael Semmes. Our illustration…

"Federal Volunteers crossing from Cincinnati to Covington on a bridge of coal boats, constructed for the occasion, on their way to defend Kentucky from the Confederates under General Kirby Smith, September 5th, 1862. The Confederate army under command of General Kirby Smith was variously estimated from 15,000 to 30,000 men. They were poorly clad, but well armed, and considering their organization were tolerably well disciplined. Their officers were bitter desperadoes, and they united in their expressed determination to pillage Cincinnati, against which city they pretended to have some terrible grudge to settle. General Kirby Smith, the Confederate commander, was much trusted by his troops, and was a cool and daring leader. Our sketch represents the Federal volunteers crossing from Cincinnati to Covington to defend Kentucky."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Federals Crossing

"Federal Volunteers crossing from Cincinnati to Covington on a bridge of coal boats, constructed for…

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's Zouaves on the Confederate battery on the hill, right bank of Antietam Creek, near Sharpsburg, September 17th, 1862, utter route of the Confederates. This brilliant and decisive charge was made about five o'clock in the afternoon of Wednesday, September 17th. Our correspondent thus described the charge: 'On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge after an obstinate contest of several hours duration, and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed and found the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, and advanced in line of battle on the enemy's new position, about a half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on our advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receiving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hill in front of the enemy's batteries, they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall, about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. Our men, though terribly decimated, gave a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and, although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's…

"Battle of Baker's Creek, May 16th, 1862- Defeat of the Confederates under Pemberton, by General Grant. On the 12th General Grant overtook General Gregg at Raymond, and after a stubborn fight defeated him, Gregg retreating with a loss of 7,000 men. Having been joined by reinforcements under General Walker, Gregg made a stand the next day at Mississippi Springs, but Grant again defeated him. On the 14th, in a still warmer engagement, he utterly defeated Gregg, who lost 400 men and 17 cannon, and fled through Jackson, firing the Capitol and many depots, storehouses and dwellings. On the 16th he met General Pemberton, with the whole garrison of Vicksburg, at Baker's Creek, and defeated him, driving him back toward Vicksburg, with a loss of 29 pieces of artillery and 4,000 men, and cutting him off from all hopes of relief. Pressing rapidly on, Grant, on the 17th, overtook Pemberton at Big Black River Bridge, and again defeated him, with a loss of 2,600 men and 17 guns. Pemberton then retired into the city, which Grant invested."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Baker's Creek

"Battle of Baker's Creek, May 16th, 1862- Defeat of the Confederates under Pemberton, by General Grant.…

"The Pontoon bridge 'On The March'- the pontoon wagons on their way from Aquia Creek to the Rappahannock. Our correspondent wrote, under date of December 6th, 1862: 'Affairs in Virginia are assuming a portentous significance. General Burnside's army is concentrated on the north bank of the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg, and the railway connecting his camps with his base of supplies at Aquia Creek, on the Potomac, is completed. A number of gunboats have ascended the Rappahannock to within fifteen miles of Fredericksburg, and will probably ascend the river quite to that point. Pontoon bridges and other appliances for crossing the river have also reached the Federal army, and the conditions for a speedy advance are nearly complete. Meanwhile, and in consequence of the delay of the Federal forces, itself the result of a rapid change of base without adequate advance provision, the Confederates have succeeded in concentrating their army in front of General Burnside, where they have been and still are busy in erecting fortifications to oppose his passage of the river.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Pontoon Bridge

"The Pontoon bridge 'On The March'- the pontoon wagons on their way from Aquia Creek to the Rappahannock.…

"The town of Falmouth, Va. on the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg. Headquarters of General Burnside and the army of the Potomac. Our special artist wrote us: 'Falmouth has that decaying, half sleepy look so characteristic of all Southern cities. A coat of paint is evidently the covering of a century, and the doors and windows cry out loudly for the glazier and carpenter. Falmouth is now the headquarters of General Burnside, and, being immediately opposite to Fredericksburg, will soon be the scene of most important operations. The river here is about six hundred feet wide, and is very often fordable. A mile to the east the railroad passes from Aquia Creek to Richmond. The bridge was burned lately, and has of course not been repaired, the army intending to pass over on pontoon bridges.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Falmouth

"The town of Falmouth, Va. on the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg. Headquarters of General Burnside…

"Towing the wounded Federal soldiers down the bayou on a raft, on the night of January 14th, 1863, after the Battle of Bayou Teche, La. General Banks had arranged to stop the depredations which the Confederate steamer <em>J. A. Cotton</em> had been long committing along the Bayou Teche. He had advanced from Labadieville on January 11th with four gunboats, ten regiments of infantry and one of artillery, reaching Carney's Bridge, near Pattersonville, early on the 14th. Their progress here was stopped by several earthworks, under whose guns lay the <em>J. A. Cotton</em>. Early on the 15th Commander McKean Buchanan opened fire from the <em>Calhoun</em>, and was joined in it by the other gunboats, while the troops were advancing on shore to engage the Confederate vessels and batteries from the rear. The troops were not long in subjecting their enemy to a fierce enfilading musketry and artillery fire from the woods; and such was its destructive effect that the <em>J. A. Cotton</em> had finally to retire toward an upper battery at Butte La Rose, on the Atchafalaya. Early on the following morning the <em>J. A. Cotton</em> was seen floating down the bayou in a sheet of flame, having been set afire and abandoned by the Confederates. The troops, therefore, returned to Brashcar City, the Federal wounded having been meanwhile placed on a raft and towed down the river."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Wounded Federals

"Towing the wounded Federal soldiers down the bayou on a raft, on the night of January 14th, 1863, after…

"Battle of Grand Coteau, La., November 3rd, furious attack on the Sixtieth Indiana, Colonel Owen. On the 3rd of November, 1863, the enemy, about six thousand strong, under General Green, attacked in force; but the Seventeenth Ohio Battery kept them at bay, supported by the Eighty-third Ohio, the Sixtieth Indiana watching the flank. A lull soon occurred, and the Sixtieth was sent to hold a bridge and small bayou on the skirt of the woods. This they did, and at last, by Burbridge's order, advanced till friend and foe were so mingled in strife that cannon could not be used; but finally the Sixtieth Indiana, with the Ninety-sixth Ohio and the Twenty-third Wisconsin, who come to its aid, fell back, the Twenty-third losing their brave colonel, Guppy. In this retrograde movement the enemy's mounted Texan infantry surrounded the Sixty-seventh Indiana. General Burbridge in vain endeavored to save them with a section of the Seventeenth Ohio Battery, but the Confederates closed around them so that he had to suspend his fire for fear of killing his own men, and Lieutenant Colonel Bushler, with two hundred men, surrendered to the enemy."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Grand Coteau

"Battle of Grand Coteau, La., November 3rd, furious attack on the Sixtieth Indiana, Colonel Owen. On…

"General McPherson entering Clinton, Miss. To facilitate the movements of the Federal armies near Chattanooga and divert the Confederate forces from hastening to the relief of Bragg. General McPherson marched from Vicksburg on the 15th of October, 1863. On the 17th he came up with the enemy in a strong position on the Canton Road, ten miles beyond Brownsville, and after a short, sharp fight, routed them, the Federals charging gallantly over the bridge and through the tall grass and corn to the enemy's line. The next day he entered Clinton, on the Vicksburg and Jackson Railroad. His gallant troops broke the Sabbath stillness of the place as they marched in, and the Confederates scattered on all sides in flight. General McPherson then proceeded to Canton, and finally returned to Vicksburg after destroying Confederate mills and factories, and alarming all the neighboring stations."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Entering Clinton

"General McPherson entering Clinton, Miss. To facilitate the movements of the Federal armies near Chattanooga…

"The war in Louisiana. The army of General Banks crossing Vermilion Bayou, October 10th, 1863. Our artist presents a view of the Federal army under General Banks crossing Vermilion Bayou on October 10th, 1863. He reached it on the 9th, and finding the bridge destroyed, shelled the shores, and meeting no response, ordered his engineers to lay the pontoon bridges, on which the forces crossed, as shown in our engraving."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Louisiana

"The war in Louisiana. The army of General Banks crossing Vermilion Bayou, October 10th, 1863. Our artist…

"The war in Mississippi. General McPherson's army crossing the Big Black at messenger's Ferry, Thursday, October 15th, 1863. When the Confederates began to concentrate all their available forces before Rosecrans at Chattanooga a diversion was made by General McPherson, who led an expedition into Mississippi as far as Canton, and compelled them to sacrifice much or change their plans. The alarm caused was beneficial. General McPherson, whom the Confederates learned to respect at Vicksburg, moved rapidly and struck severely. Our sketch represents the army crossing by bridge and ford the Big Black, at a place called Messenger's Ferry, on Thursday, October 15th."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Mississippi

"The war in Mississippi. General McPherson's army crossing the Big Black at messenger's Ferry, Thursday,…

"The war in Louisiana. General Banks's army, in the advance on Shreveport, crossing Cane River, March 31st, 1864. Our sketch represents the Army of the gulf, under General Franklin, crossing Cane River by bridge and pontoons, on March 31st, 1864. The point sketched is about fifty-four miles above Alexandria. The battle at Cramps' Hill which followed is thus described by our correspondent: 'On the 2nd of April our cavalry advancing on Shreveport came upon the Confederates in force at Cramp's Hill, twenty-two miles from Nachitoches, where the roads to Manny and Pleasant Hill branch off. Major Bassford, being in the advance of Lucas's brigade, skirmished with the Confederates, who made a stand eight times, but could not hold their ground. The first line of our skirmishers was dismounted and the second mounted. After their repulse here the Confederates retired up the Manny road, pursued by Major Bassford. They made a stand and opened with artillery, but Rawles's battery silenced their guns and routed De Bray's Texas cavalry in confusion."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Louisiana

"The war in Louisiana. General Banks's army, in the advance on Shreveport, crossing Cane River, March…

"The war in Virginia- Sheridan's Great Battle with J. E. B. Stuart at Yellow Tavern, May 11th, 1864- the Confederate raider's last fight. We give a sketch, which our readers cannot fail to admire, of the battle of Yellow Tavern, May 11th, 1864, where General J. E. B. Stuart, whose fame began by a successful raid around McClellan, fell mortally wounded. Our correspondent wrote: 'We found the enemy very strongly entrenched behind fortifications composing the outer line of the Richmond defenses. The position was a strong one, being situated upon a hill, commanding our whole corps, and our preservation depended on our driving them out. General Sheridan was equal to the emergency. The enemy was already pursuing us closely in the rear. The general ordered Custer to take his gallant brigade and carry the position. General Custer placed himself at the head of his command, and with drawn sabres and deafening cheers charged directly in the face of a withering fire, captured two pieces of artillery, upward of one hundred prisoners, together with caissons, ammunition and horses, which he brought off in safety. It was, without exception, the most gallant charge of the raid, and when it became known among the corps cheer after cheer rent the air. The Confederates retreated behind the Chickahominy, destroying in their flight Meadow Bridge. In the rear, Colonel Gregg's brigade of the Second Division, under General Wilson, was hotly engaged with Stuart. General Wilson sent word to General Sheridan that the enemy were driving him slowly back. General Sheridan replied that he must hold the position at all hazards- that he could and must whip the enemy. Colonel Gregg's brigade being re-enforced by a regiment from the First Brigade, charged the enemy and drove them nearly a mile. The day was now ours. The enemy had disappeared from our front, and we succeeded in rebuilding the Meadow Bridge, and the First and Third Divisions crossed, covered by the Second Division which in turn withdrew and also crossed, without being annoyed by the enemy.' In a desperate charge at the head of a column the Confederate general Stuart fell mortally wounded."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Sheridan's Great Battle

"The war in Virginia- Sheridan's Great Battle with J. E. B. Stuart at Yellow Tavern, May 11th, 1864-…

"View of Richmond, Va., from the prison camp at Belle Isle, James River. Belle Island is situated in the James River, a little above the bridge which connects the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad. It is about an acre and a half, and in this small space there were on an average ten thousand Federal soldiers imprisoned and slowly tortured. The Confederate capital has been so often described that we shall confine ourselves to the special view before us. The prominent building is the Capitol; the five churches on the left are St. Paul's, First Baptist, St. James's, Second Baptist and Grace Street Methodist; the large building at the end of the bridge is Haxall's flouring mill, the largest one of the kind in the world, being thirteen stories high."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Belle Isle

"View of Richmond, Va., from the prison camp at Belle Isle, James River. Belle Island is situated in…

"Sherman's Seventeenth Corps crossing the south Edisto River, S. C., on Pontoons, at Bennaker's Bridge, February 9th, 1865."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Seventeenth Corps

"Sherman's Seventeenth Corps crossing the south Edisto River, S. C., on Pontoons, at Bennaker's Bridge,…

"The war in Virginia--railroad bridge over the Rappahannock, at Rappahannock Station."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Virginia

"The war in Virginia--railroad bridge over the Rappahannock, at Rappahannock Station."— Frank Leslie,…

"The war in Mississippi- General McPherson driving the enemy from their position on the Canton Road, near Brownsville."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Canton Road

"The war in Mississippi- General McPherson driving the enemy from their position on the Canton Road,…

"Old stone towers of the Niagra Suspension Bridge."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Niagra bridge

"Old stone towers of the Niagra Suspension Bridge."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895