King and young man watch old lady smash pots

King

King and young man watch old lady smash pots

Escapement is a mechanical device intervening between the power and the time-measurer of a clock or watch, and whose purpose is to secure uniformity in the rate of movement.

Escapement

Escapement is a mechanical device intervening between the power and the time-measurer of a clock or…

Gulliver's watch is being taken away. From <em>Gulliver's Travels</em> by Dean Swift.

Gulliver's Watch

Gulliver's watch is being taken away. From Gulliver's Travels by Dean Swift.

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Camp Dennison, sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on the banks of the Miami River, General Cox commanding- the Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus Railroad passed directly through the camp grounds. This camp, which was organized for a camp of instruction and drill, was situated about sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on a field of seventy-five acres, on the banks of the Miami River, surrounded by high bluffs. The Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus Railroad passed directly through the grounds, and this road was guarded for miles by sentries in order to watch bridges, telegraph wires and culverts, as spies were infesting the whole country. There were 18,000 men in camp, including the splendid Kentucky Regiment of Guthrie Grays, and quarters were erected for 20,000 men, who were soon on the ground. The tents were rough-board shanties, but were comfortable, and the officers had marquees erected in the rear of the regimental quarters. This brigade was under the command of General Cox, a West Point officer, and under the immediate supvervision of General George B. McClellan. It was in a beautiful location, and the troops were kept under a very strict surveillance, there being but few spectators allowed to visit the ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Camp Dennison

"Camp Dennison, sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on the banks of the Miami River, General Cox commanding-…

A dog breed native to Spain. "The present beed is a strong and courageous race, of moderate intelligence: they are used as watch-dogs, and are also in request for bull-fights and other Spanish exhibitions." —Goodrich, 1885

Cuban Mastiff

A dog breed native to Spain. "The present beed is a strong and courageous race, of moderate intelligence:…

"Battle of Carrick's Ford, Western Virginia- discovery of the body of General Garnett, by Major Gordon and Colonel Dumont, after the battle. After the Confederates had crossed the fourth ford General Garnett again endeavored to rally his men, standing waving his hand on an exposed point near the river bank, by his side only one young man (Chaplet), wearing the uniform of the Georgia Sharpshooters. Three of Dumont's men fired at the same time, and Garnett and his companion fell at the first round. The men rushed across, and on turning the body discovered that the Confederate leader of Western Virginia had paid the penalty; he was shot through the heart. Major Gordon, U.S.A., closed his eyes reverently, and Colonel Dumont, coming up, had him carried into a grove close by, where they laid him down, taking care of his sword and watch, to be sent with his body to his family." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Corrick's Ford

"Battle of Carrick's Ford, Western Virginia- discovery of the body of General Garnett, by Major Gordon…

"Engagement between the United States gunboats, commanded by Commodore Davis, and the Confederate Mosquito Fleet, under Commodore Tatnall, near Fort Pulaski, Savannah River, January 28th, 1862. Our artist described this spirited sketch as follows: 'On Monday night Lieutenant Barnes was dispatched in the <em>Ottawa's</em> gig to scout up the creek and report. Passing the piles with ease, he pulled silently up the stream with muffled oars, and with no opposition succeeded in reaching the mouth of the creek where it enters the Savannah River. He came upon the fleet of Tatnall lying there, and approached near enough to see the watch on deck. As he was too near them in case they discovered him, and as he had accomplished the object of reconnoisance, he returned and reported the facts to Captain Davis. On Tuesday forenoon Tatnall's fleet was again discovered standing down the Savannah. We beat to quarters, and when the flagship had got within range we opened on her with an eleven-inch gun from the <em>Ottawa</em>. The signal for action having been given, the gunboats opened fire. The Confederates returned a few shots, which fell short. The engagement lasted nearly two hours, during which time the Confederate Flagship was struck three times, seriously damaging her. One eleven-inch shell struck her on her wheelhouse, and so much disabled her as to compel the commander to signal for assistance, and one steamer turned round and went to her aid. The other three steamed down toward Fort Pulaski faster than they ever went before.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Gunboat engagement

"Engagement between the United States gunboats, commanded by Commodore Davis, and the Confederate Mosquito…

"General Patterson, born in Cappagh, County Tyrone, Ireland, January 12th, 1792, died in Philadelphia, Pa., August 7th, 1881. He was commissioned first lieutenant of infantry in the War of 1812, and afterward served on General Joseph Bloomfield's staff. He became major general of volunteers at the beginning of the Mexican War, and served with distinction at Cerro Gordo and Jalapa. At the beginning of the Civil War he was mustered into the service as major general of volunteers. He crossed the Potomac on June 15th at Williamsport. When General McDowell advanced into Virginia General Patterson was instructed to watch the troops under General Jonston at Winchester, Va. He claimed that the failure of General Scott to send him orders, for which he had been directed to wait, caused his failure to co-operate with McDowell in the movements that resulted in the battle of Bull Run. He was mustered out of service on the expiration of his commission, July 27th, 1861."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Robert Patterson

"General Patterson, born in Cappagh, County Tyrone, Ireland, January 12th, 1792, died in Philadelphia,…

A typical pocket stop watch used for timing.

Stop Watch

A typical pocket stop watch used for timing.

"Torn Rock. This view is from the verge of the dam above the Ramapo works, near the rail-way, looking northeast. The eminence is called Torn Rock, from its ragged appearance on its southeastern side. There is a deep fissure in a portion of the bare rock, from which comes up a sound like the ticking of a watch, caused by the water which percolates through the seams in the granite. A tradition was long current that Washington lost his watch in the fissure, and that, by some miraculous power, it continued to tick!'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Torn Rock

"Torn Rock. This view is from the verge of the dam above the Ramapo works, near the rail-way, looking…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Other species, which also bore into timber in their larva state, are well known by the name of <em>Death-watch - Anobium -</em> from their habit of knocking with their jaws against the wood-work upon which they are standing, this being the call of the insect to its mate." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Deathwatch Beetles

"Other species, which also bore into timber in their larva state, are well known by the name of Death-watch

"The position of the true meridian may be found as follows: Point the hour hand of a watch towards the sun; the line joining the pivot and the point midway between the hour hand and XIII on the dial will point towards the south; that is to say if the observer stands so as to face the sun and the XII on the dial, he will be looking south. To point the hour hand exactly at the sun, stick a pin and bring the hour hand into the shadow. At night a line drawn toward the north star from the observer's position is approximately a true meridian." &mdash; Moss, 1914

True meridian

"The position of the true meridian may be found as follows: Point the hour hand of a watch towards the…

A small timepiece, to be carried in the pocket.

Watch

A small timepiece, to be carried in the pocket.

"Now Argus had a hundred eyes in his head, and never went to sleep with more than two at a time, so he kept watch of Io constantly." &mdash;Bulfinch, 1897

Argus

"Now Argus had a hundred eyes in his head, and never went to sleep with more than two at a time, so…

A wheel with pointed and anglar teeth, against which a ratchet abuts, used either for converting a reciprocating into a rotary motion or for admitting motion in one direction only.

Ratchet Wheel

A wheel with pointed and anglar teeth, against which a ratchet abuts, used either for converting a reciprocating…

King Henry was a builder of beautiful churches. Westminster Abby, as it is now, was one. And he was charitable to the poor that, when he had his children weighed, he gave their weight in gold and silver in alms. But he gave to everyone who asked, and so always wanted money; and sometimes his men could get nothing for the king and queen to eat, but by going and taking sheep and poultry from the poor farmers around; so that things were nearly as bad as under William Rufus-because the king was so foolishly good-natured. The Pope was always sending for money, too; and the king tried to raise it in ways that, according to Magna Carta, he had sworn not to do. His foreign friends told him that if he minded Magna Carta he would be a poor creature-not like a king who might do all he pleased; and whenever he listened to them he broke the laws of Magna Carta. Then, when his barons complained and frightened him, he swore again to keep them; so that nobody could trust him, and his weakness was almost as bad for the kingdom as John's wickedness. When they could bear it no longer, the barons all met him at the council, which was called the Parliament, from a French word meaning talk. This time they came in armor, binging all their fighting men, and declared that he had broken his word so often that they should appoint some of their own number to watch him, and hinder his doing anything against the laws he had sworn to observe, or from getting money from the people without their consent.

King Henry and his Barons

King Henry was a builder of beautiful churches. Westminster Abby, as it is now, was one. And he was…

A projecting watch tower, or other advanced work, before the gate of a castle or fortified town. The term barbican was more especially applied to the outwork intended to defend the drawbridge, which in modern fortifications is called the <em>tete du pont</em>.

Barbican

A projecting watch tower, or other advanced work, before the gate of a castle or fortified town. The…

The "death-watch," Sitodrepa panicea species; larva.

Deathwatch Beetle

The "death-watch," Sitodrepa panicea species; larva.

The "death-watch," Sitodrepa panicea species; beetle from above.

Deathwatch Beetle

The "death-watch," Sitodrepa panicea species; beetle from above.

The "death-watch," Sitodrepa panicea species; beetle from side.

Deathwatch Beetle

The "death-watch," Sitodrepa panicea species; beetle from side.

(1732-1799) Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais was a watch-maker, inventor, musician, politician, invalid, fugitive, spy, publisher, arms-dealer, and revolutionary for both the French and American. He was famous for his theatrical works, especially the three Figaro plays.

Pierre Beaumarchais

(1732-1799) Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais was a watch-maker, inventor, musician, politician,…

"This is done in the mechanism of the watch, of which a, is the barrel containing the power in the form of a convoluted spring, and b the fusee which acts as a varying lever, and through which motion is conveyed to the hands of the watch." -Comstock 1850

Barrel and Fusee

"This is done in the mechanism of the watch, of which a, is the barrel containing the power in the form…

"Thus, if we suppose the conducting wire be placed in a vertical situation, as shown, and p, n, the current of positive electricity to be descending through it, from p to n, and if throught the point c in the wire in the plane NN be taken, perpendicular to p, n, that is in the present case a horiczontal plane, then if any number of circles be described in that plane, having c for thier common centre, the action of the current on the wire on upon the north pole of the magnet, will be to move it in a direction corresponding to the motion of the hands of a watch, having the dial towards the positive pole of the battery." -Comstock 1850

Circular Motion of the [Electric] Fluid

"Thus, if we suppose the conducting wire be placed in a vertical situation, as shown, and p, n, the…

"Hold a lamp reflector or other large concave mirror directly facing the sun, so as to bring the rays of light to a focus...At some point, W, between F and C, the center of curvature of the reflector, hang a loud-ticking watch, and hunt for the point, X, at which the ear can most distinctly hear the ticking. Moving the reflector will render the sound inaudible." -Avery 1895

Reflection of Sound Using a Reflector

"Hold a lamp reflector or other large concave mirror directly facing the sun, so as to bring the rays…

"Fill with carbon dioxide a large rubber toy balloon or other double-convex lens having easily flexible walls. Suspend a watch, and place yourself so that you can just hear its ticking. Have the gas-filled lens moved back and forth in the line between watch and and ear until the ticking is much more plainly heard. Use a glass funnel as an ear-trumpet." -Avery 1895

Sound Refraction

"Fill with carbon dioxide a large rubber toy balloon or other double-convex lens having easily flexible…

"A key is used to turn the cone, B. By doing so it wraps the chain around the cone and tightly coils the spring inside the barrel, A. The spring draws the chain off of the cone turning the barrel." &mdash;Quackenbos 1859

The Fusee

"A key is used to turn the cone, B. By doing so it wraps the chain around the cone and tightly coils…

A cat repairing his car as other cats watch.

Cat Mechanic

A cat repairing his car as other cats watch.

"If a compass is not available, a watch can be used. Hold the watch flat in the hand and with the hour hand pointing in the direction of the sun; a direction halfway between the hour hand and 12 is south." -Finch, 1920

Watch Compass

"If a compass is not available, a watch can be used. Hold the watch flat in the hand and with the hour…

The diagram shows how to determine North using a watch and the location of the sun.

Watch Compass

The diagram shows how to determine North using a watch and the location of the sun.

Watch making is a beautiful and complicated as the watch it's self. It was a process that required several small machines and measurement.

Watch Making

Watch making is a beautiful and complicated as the watch it's self. It was a process that required several…

Two boys from prehistoric times watch from a tree as a bull charges a bear.

Prehistoric Boys

Two boys from prehistoric times watch from a tree as a bull charges a bear.

A man sitting down checking the time on his pocket watch.

Pocket Watch

A man sitting down checking the time on his pocket watch.

"When the pupa is born, the workers watch over the newly-born insect; for some days they feed it, help it to walk, and do not abandon it until it can dispense with their services."

Pupa of the Red Ant (Myrmica Rubra)

"When the pupa is born, the workers watch over the newly-born insect; for some days they feed it, help…

An older adult male and a young girl walking together. The young girl is holding tight to the older male's coat while the man is holding on to his cane.

Man and Child Walking

An older adult male and a young girl walking together. The young girl is holding tight to the older…

An illustration of a woman resting upon the back of a chair gazing into a fire.

Woman Watching Fire Place

An illustration of a woman resting upon the back of a chair gazing into a fire.

An illustration of a pocket watch.

Pocket Watch

An illustration of a pocket watch.

An illustration of a young boy tracing his shadow on a wall while three young girls watch.

Shadow Drawing

An illustration of a young boy tracing his shadow on a wall while three young girls watch.

An illustration of a woman resting upon the window as she looks out.

Woman Looking Out of Window

An illustration of a woman resting upon the window as she looks out.

An illustration of children playing with fake birds while adults watch.

Children Playing

An illustration of children playing with fake birds while adults watch.

An illustration of a man and woman sitting on a bench with a man standing be them.

Sitting on Bench

An illustration of a man and woman sitting on a bench with a man standing be them.

An illustration of two men racing on horseback.

Horse Racing

An illustration of two men racing on horseback.

Watch belonging to Martha Custis Washington (June 2, 1731 &ndash; May 22, 1802), the wife of George Washington, the first president of the United States. Although the title was not coined until after her death, Martha Washington is considered to be the first First Lady of the United States. During her lifetime, she was simply known as "Lady Washington."

Martha Washington's Bridal Watch

Watch belonging to Martha Custis Washington (June 2, 1731 – May 22, 1802), the wife of George…

A piece in clocks and watches that converts rotational motion into oscillation, as in a pendulum.

Recoiling Escapement

A piece in clocks and watches that converts rotational motion into oscillation, as in a pendulum.

A piece in clocks and watches that converts rotational motion into oscillation, as in a pendulum.

Deadbeat Escapement

A piece in clocks and watches that converts rotational motion into oscillation, as in a pendulum.

This Antique bottle is a small watch shaped perfume bottle. Made out of blue and white glass, it has handles for suspension that is similar to a hunting flask.

Antique Bottle

This Antique bottle is a small watch shaped perfume bottle. Made out of blue and white glass, it has…

"Files. a, cotter-file when large, and verge- or pivot-file when small; b, square file (parallel or taper); c, banking or watch-pinion file when parallel, and knife-file when tape; d, half-round, nicking, piercing, or round-off file; e, round, gulleting, or rat-tail file; f, triangular, three-square, or saw file; g, equaling, clock-pinion, or endless-screw file when parallel, and slitting, entering, warding, or barrel-hole file when tape; h, cross- or double-half-round file; i, screw-head, feather-edge, or slitting file." -Whitney, 1911

Types of Files

"Files. a, cotter-file when large, and verge- or pivot-file when small; b, square file (parallel or…

"A drill to which a steady momentum is imparted by means of a fly-wheel having a reciprocating motion like that of the balance-wheel of a watch." -Whitney, 1911

Fly Drill

"A drill to which a steady momentum is imparted by means of a fly-wheel having a reciprocating motion…

An illustration of a Roman Numeral clock showing 7:30.

Clock 7:30

An illustration of a Roman Numeral clock showing 7:30.

"And they came to a place which was named Gethsemane: and he saith to his disciples, Sit ye here, while I shall pray. And he taketh with him Peter and James and John, and began to be sore amazed, and to be very heavy; And saith unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death: tarry ye here, and watch. And he went forward a little, and fell on the ground, and prayed that, if it were possible, the hour might pass from him." Mark 14:32-35 KJV

Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane

"And they came to a place which was named Gethsemane: and he saith to his disciples, Sit ye here, while…

"And Moses stretched out his hand over the sea; and Jehovah caused the sea to go back by a strong east wind all the night, and made the sea dry land, and the waters were divided. And the children of Israel went into the midst of the sea upon the dry ground: and the waters were a wall unto them on their right hand, and on their left. And the Egyptians pursued, and went in after them into the midst of the sea, all Pharaoh's horses, his chariots, and his horsemen. And it came to pass in the morning watch, that Jehovah looked forth upon the host of the Egyptians through the pillar of fire and of cloud, and discomfited the host of the Egyptians. And he took off their chariot wheels, and they drove them heavily; so that the Egyptians said, Let us flee from the face of Israel; for Jehovah fighteth for them against the Egyptians. And Jehovah said unto Moses, Stretch out thy hand over the sea, that the waters may come again upon the Egyptians, upon their chariots, and upon their horsemen. And Moses stretched forth his hand over the sea, and the sea returned to its strength when the morning appeared; and the Egyptians fled against it; and Jehovah overthrew the Egyptians in the midst of the sea." Exodus 14:21-27
<p>The Israelites stand on dry land with their children and possessions as the sea swallows the Egyptian army. Moses stands in the middle holding his staff out toward the sea. The pillar of cloud separates the Israelites from the Egpytians.

Pharaoh's Host Destroyed

"And Moses stretched out his hand over the sea; and Jehovah caused the sea to go back by a strong east…

An illustration of a young man watching a lovely young woman walking along a path.

Man Watching Woman Walk

An illustration of a young man watching a lovely young woman walking along a path.

An illustration of a hen raking the barnyard while  a goose, cat, two dogs, and a hen watch.

Hen Raking Barnyard with Animals Watching

An illustration of a hen raking the barnyard while a goose, cat, two dogs, and a hen watch.

This back of watch is elaborately engraved. It was made in London, England.

Back of Watch

This back of watch is elaborately engraved. It was made in London, England.

This back of watch is elaborately engraved. It was made in London, England.

Back of Watch

This back of watch is elaborately engraved. It was made in London, England.

This back of watch is elaborately engraved. It was made in London, England.

Back of Watch

This back of watch is elaborately engraved. It was made in London, England.

This back of watch engraving is a British design.

Back of Watch

This back of watch engraving is a British design.