Lit2Go

Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level 10

Readability levels for passages on Lit2Go are reported as Flesch-Kincaid grade levels which are roughly equivalent to U.S. grade levels.

Books

10.0

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a first person narrative told by the title character, Huckleberry Finn, as he accompanies a runaway slave on his journey to freedom.

The Professor

by Charlotte Brontë

The Professor was Charlotte Brontë's first novel, written before Jane Eyre but rejected by publishers until after her death. The book tells the story of a young man named William Crimsworth, from his formative years to his appointment as a teacher at an all-girls school. The story is based upon Brontë’s experiences in school.

The Vampyre

by John Polidori

The Vampyre is a short novel written by John William Polidori and is a progenitor of the romantic vampire genre of fantasy fiction.

The Vampyre was first published on April 1, 1819, by Colburn in the New Monthly Magazine with the false attribution “A Tale by Lord Byron.” The name of the work’s protagonist, “Lord Ruthven”, added to this assumption, for that name was originally used in Lady Caroline Lamb’s novel Glenarvon, in which a thinly-disguised Byron figure was also named Lord Ruthven. Despite repeated denials by Byron and Polidori, the authorship often went unclarified.

The novel was an immediate popular success, partly because of the Byron attribution and partly because it exploited the gothic horror predilections of the public. Polidori transformed the vampire from a character in folklore into the form we recognize today—an aristocratic fiend who preys among high society.

Vanity Fair

by William Makepeace Thackeray

Vanity Fair is a 19th century social satire by William Makepeace Thackeray. The novel follows the adventures and dealings of Becky Sharp and Amelia Sedley.

The Woman in White

by Wilkie Collins

The Woman in White is an epistolary novel written by Wilkie Collins in 1859, serialized in 1859-1860, and first published in book form in 1860. It is considered to be to the first mystery novel, and is widely regarded as one of the first (and finest) in the genre of “sensation novels”.

Wuthering Heights

by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontë’s only novel. The story is told in layers, a format that has earned the novel much praise despite initial mixed reviews. It is the story of Catherine and Heathcliff and how their unresolved passion eventually destroys them both.

10.1

The Colored Cadet at West Point

by Henry O. Flipper

The Colored Cadet at West Point is an autobiographical novel detailing the events leading up to Henry O. Flipper's groundbreaking appointment to the West Point Military Academy, and his active service in the U.S. Army that followed graduation.

Gulliver's Travels

by Jonathan Swift

Gulliver’s Travels (1726, amended 1735), officially Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, is a novel by Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the “travellers’ tales” literary sub-genre. It is widely considered Swift’s magnum opus (masterpiece) and is his most celebrated work, as well as one of the indisputable classics of English literature.

The book became tremendously popular as soon as it was published (Alexander Pope stated that “it is universally read, from the cabinet council to the nursery”), and it is likely that it has never been out of print since then. George Orwell declared it to be among the six most indispensable books in world literature. It is claimed the inspiration for Gulliver came from the sleeping giant profile of the Cavehill in Belfast.

My Bondage and My Freedom

by Frederick Douglass

My Bondage and My Freedom is an autobiographical slave narrative written by Frederick Douglass and published in 1855. It is the second of three autobiographies written by Douglass, and is mainly an expansion of his first (Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass), discussing in greater detail his transition from bondage to liberty. Douglass, a former slave, following his liberation went on to become a prominent abolitionist, speaker, author, and publisher.

10.2

The Souls of Black Folk

by W. E. B. Du Bois

The Souls of Black Folk is a classic work of African–American literature by activist W.E.B. Du Bois. The book, published in 1903, contains several essays on race, some of which had been previously published in Atlantic Monthly magazine. Du Bois drew from his own experiences to develop this groundbreaking work on being African–American in American society. Outside of its notable place in African–American history, The Souls of Black Folk also holds an important place in social science as one of the early works to deal with sociology.

10.4

10.5

Symbollic Logic

by Lewis Carroll

Symbollic Logic is a text discussing the area of mathematics which studies the purely formal properties of strings of symbols.

Walden; or, Life in the Woods

by Henry David Thoreau

Walden (also known as Walden; or, Life in the Woods) by Henry David Thoreau is one of the best-known non-fiction books written by an American. Published in 1854, it details Thoreau’s life for two years, two months, and two days in second-growth forest around the shores of Walden Pond, on land owned by Ralph Waldo Emerson, not far from his friends and family in Concord, Massachusetts. Walden was written so that the stay appears to be a year, with expressed seasonal divisions. Thoreau called it an experiment in simple living. Thoreau lived in close geographical proximity to the town Concord: “living a mile from any neighbor,” should be taken literally; he lived about a mile from his neighbors. He did not go into the woods to become a hermit, but to isolate himself from civil society in order to gain a more objective understanding of it. Walden is neither a novel nor a true autobiography, but a social critique of much of the contemporary Western World, with its consumerist attitudes and its distance from and destruction of nature.

10.8

The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym

by Edgar Allan Poe

The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket is the only complete novel written by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. The work relates the tale of the young Arthur Gordon Pym who stows away aboard a whaling ship called Grampus. Various adventures and misadventures befall Pym including shipwreck, mutiny, and cannibalism before he is saved by the crew of the Jane Guy. Aboard this vessel, Pym and a sailor named Dirk Peters continue their adventures further south. Docking on land, they encounter hostile black-skinned natives before escaping back to the ocean. The novel ends abruptly as Pym and Peters continue towards the South Pole.

Passages

10.0

Sir Walter Raleigh

Explorers

by Wilbur F. Gordy

Sir Walter Raleigh grew up in England during a time of Spanish domination of the seas and the New World. Being patriotic, and having gained the notice of the queen and her dazzling court, he set out to make a new more powerful and glorious England. He was responsible for colonies set up in the New World which eventually met with disasters. He was not able to discover what happened to them in spite of much wealth devoted to the search.

Henry M. Flagler — Empire Builder

Florida: Essays and Poems

by W. M. Walker

A profile of Henry M. Flagler published in 1925 in a Florida magazine. This profile was the first in a series called "The Ten Greatest Men of Florida," which the magazine described as a reader-requested series on the "men who had done the most toward the progress and development of Florida."

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