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Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level 11

Readability levels for passages on Lit2Go are reported as Flesch-Kincaid grade levels which are roughly equivalent to U.S. grade levels.

Books

11.0

The Blithedale Romance

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Blithedale Romance is the third of the major novels of Nathaniel Hawthorne. Much of the action of the novel is set at Blithedale, a utopian socialist community that is founded upon anti-capitalist ideals, yet is destroyed by the self-interested behavior of its members.

Deductive Logic

by George William Joseph Stock, M.A.

"The Three Fundamental Laws of Thought. (1) The Law of Identity-- Whatever is, is; or, in a more precise form, Every A is A. (2) The Law of Contradiction-- Nothing can both be and not be; Nothing can be A and not A. (3) The Law of Excluded Middle-- Everything must either be or not be; Everything is either A or not A."

In this treatise, English thinker George William Joseph Stock explains deductive logic.

 

Hamlet

by William Shakespeare

Hamlet is a tragedy and revenge play by William Shakespeare. It is one of his best-known works, one of the most-quoted writings in the English language and is universally included on lists of the world’s greatest books.

The Last of the Mohicans

by James Fenimore Cooper

The Last of the Mohicans is a novel that takes place during the French and Indian War following the adventures of Nathaniel "Natty" Bumppo and his two Mohican companions as they attempt to rescue the daughters of a British commander.

The Tragedy of MacBeth

by William Shakespeare

Macbeth is among the best known of William Shakespeare’s plays, as well as his shortest surviving tragedy. It is frequently performed at professional and community theatres around the world. The play, loosely based upon the historical account of King Macbeth of Scotland by Raphael Holinshed and the Scottish philosopher Hector Boece, is often seen as an archetypal tale of the dangers of the lust for power and betrayal of friends. It has frequently been adapted. In the theatrical world, many superstitions are associated with “Macbeth,” all connected with the belief that the play is somehow “cursed.” Many actors will not mention the name of the play aloud, referring to it as “the Scottish Play”.

Melmoth the Wanderer

by Charles Robert Maturin

The central character, John Melmoth, is a scholar who sells his soul to the devil in exchange for 150 extra years of life and spends that time searching for someone who will take over the pact for him; the novel actually takes place in the present, but this backstory is revealed through several nested stories-within-a-story that work backwards through time (usually through the Gothic trope of old books).

The Merchant of Venice

by William Shakespeare

The Merchant of Venice is one of William Shakespeare's best-known plays, written sometime between 1596 and 1598. Although it is sometimes classified as a comedy and shares certain aspects with the other romantic comedies, it is perhaps more remembered for its dramatic scenes (particularly the trial scene) and is best known for its portrayal of the Jew Shylock, which has raised questions of anti-semitism.

Romeo and Juliet

by William Shakespeare

Romeo and Juliet is an early tragedy by William Shakespeare about two teenage “star-cross’d lovers” whose “untimely deaths” ultimately unite their feuding households. The play has been highly praised by literary critics for its language and dramatic effect. It was among Shakespeare’s most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Romeo and Juliet are widely represented as archetypal young lovers.

The Scarlet Letter

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Scarlet Letter, published in 1850, is set in Puritan New England in the 17th century. Exploring the issues of grace, legalism, and guilt, it tells the story of Hester Prynne, a Puritan woman who commits adultry then struggles to create a new life.

11.2

Beowulf

by Francis Barton Gummere

Beowulf, the epic tale of adventure that follows Beowulf as he battles Grendel, Grendel's Mother, and later becomes king. Beowulf was originally written in Old English by an unknown Anglo-Saxon poet sometime between the 8th and 11th centuries. It is one of the most important works of Anglo-Saxon literature. This translation, by Professor Francis Gummere, was first published in 1910.

11.5

The Marble Faun

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Marble Faun is a gothic romance concerning three young Americans and one young Italian Count who meet in Rome. The book features picturesque descriptions of historic art and architecture in Rome as a backdrop to a tale of mystery, murder, and romance.

11.7

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