Lit2Go

Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level 7

Readability levels for passages on Lit2Go are reported as Flesch-Kincaid grade levels which are roughly equivalent to U.S. grade levels.

Books

7.0

The Bird's Christmas Carol

by Kate Douglas Wiggin

In The Bird's Christmas Carol, the arrival of Carol into the Bird family brings joy and sadness throughout the years, but her presence reminds everyone of the real meaning of Christmas.

The Castle of Otranto

by Horace Walpole

The Castle of Otranto is considered the first "gothic" novel, a genre that loves melodrama, mystery, hidden places, ancestral curses, and fainting heroines. Its roots are the "romance," which was a tale of heroism (not love as it is now known), and the Romantic movement in literature, which focused on emotion and the sublimity of nature. When The Castle of Otranto was first published, it was said to be a translation of a lost medieval transcript, and received positive attention. But when it was next published, the truth was revealed--that the story was quite modern and written by a priviledged author. Critics then panned it, but it survives today as the seminal Gothic literary novel.

The Little Lame Prince

by Maria Dinah Mulock Craik

The Little Lame Prince and his Travelling Cloak (often published under its shorter title The Little Lame Prince) is a story for children written by Dinah Maria Mulock Craik and first published in 1875. In the story, a young prince whose legs are paralysed due to a childhood trauma is given a magical travelling cloak by his fairy godmother; he uses this cloak to go on various adventures, and develops great wisdom and empathy in the process.

The Sea-Wolf

by Jack London

The Sea-Wolf is a psychological adventure novel by American novelist Jack London about a literary critic and other survivors of an ocean collision who come under the dominance of Wolf Larsen, the powerful and amoral sea captain who rescues them.

Tik-Tok of Oz

by L. Frank Baum

Tik-Tok of Oz is the eighth Land of Oz book written by L. Frank Baum. Published in 1914, the book actually has little to do with Tik-Tok and is primarily the quest of the Shaggy Man (introduced in The Road to Oz) to rescue his brother, and his resulting conflict with the Nome King.

The Tin Woodman of Oz

by L. Frank Baum

The Tin Woodman of Oz is the twelfth Land of Oz book written by L. Frank Baum and was originally published in 1918. The Tin Woodman is unexpectedly reunited with his Munchkin sweetheart Nimmie Amee from the days when he was flesh and blood. This was a backstory from The Wizard of Oz.

Treasure Island

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Robert Louis Stevenson, narrating a tale of “buccaneers and buried gold.” Traditionally considered a coming of age story, its influence on popular lore about pirates can not be overestimated.

7.1

The Call of the Wild

by Jack London

The Call of the Wild is a novel by American writer Jack London. The plot concerns a previously domesticated happy dog named Buck, whose primordial instincts return after a series of events leads to his serving as a sled dog in the Yukon during the 19th-century Klondike Gold Rush, in which sled dogs were bought at generous prices.

Published in 1903, The Call of the Wild is London's most-read book, and it is generally considered his best, the masterpiece of his so-called "early period". Because the protagonist is a dog, it is sometimes classified as a juvenile novel, suitable for children, but it is dark in tone and contains numerous scenes of cruelty and violence.

London followed the book in 1906 with White Fang, a companion novel with many similar plot elements and themes as Call of the Wild, although following a mirror image plot in which a wild wolf becomes civilized by a mining expert from San Francisco named Weedon Scott.

7.2

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Crime and Punishment focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov, an impoverished St. Petersburg ex-student who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her money.

7.4

Babbitt

by Sinclair Lewis

Babbitt is a novel by Sinclair Lewis. Largely a satire of American culture, society, and behavior, it critiques the vacuity of middle-class American life and its pressure on individuals toward conformity.

Behind the Scenes

by Elizabeth Keckley

Behind the Scenes Or, Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House is an autobiographical narrative by Elizabeth Keckley. In it she tells the story of her life as a slave and her time as a seamstress for Mrs. Lincoln in the White House.

7.5

David Copperfield

by Charles Dickens

David Copperfield is a novel by Charles Dickens. Like most of his works, it originally appeared in serial form a year earlier. Many elements within the novel follow events in Dickens' own life, and it is probably the most autobiographical of all of his novels.

The Invisible Man

by H.G. Wells

The Invisible Man is a suspense novel by H.G. Wells, narrating the tale of "Griffin", a scientist who undergoes an irreversible procedure, the results of which eventually drive him insane.

Peter Pan

by J.M. Barrie

Peter Pan (also known as the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up or Peter and Wendy) is the story of a mischievous little boy who can fly, and his adventures on the island of Neverland with Wendy Darling and her brothers, the fairy Tinker Bell, the Lost Boys, the Indian princess Tiger Lily, and the pirate Captain Hook.

7.6

Little Women

by Louisa May Alcott

Little Women concerns the lives and loves of four sisters growing up during the American Civil War. It was based on Alcott's own experiences as a child in Germantown, Pennsylvania with her three sisters, Anna, May, and Elizabeth.

Passages

7.0

The Lion and the Mouse

Aesop's Fables

by Aesop

The Lion wakes as a mouse runs across his face. He caught the mouse who begs to be let go with a promise to help the Lion someday. Later, the Lion is captured by hunters. The mouse gnaws the rope and sets the Lion free.

“The Lion and the Statue”

Aesop's Fables

by Aesop

A Man and a Lion talked about the strength of men and lions. Each believed his species was stronger. The Man showed the Lion a statue of Hercules overcoming the Lion. The Lion believed this proved nothing because a man made the statue.

The Purloined Letter

The Works of Edgar Allan Poe

by Edgar Allan Poe

An unnamed narrator tells how a Parisian detective, Auguste Dupin, solves a case of a “purloined letter.” The letter belonged to the Queen, and the man who took it had switched it with a plain letter, and was using the information contained in the stolen letter to blackmail the Queen. The police Prefect wants Dupin to figure out how to catch the man, and Dupin reasons his way through the case, eventually nabbing the thief by using his own technique against him—switching letters back.

Load More