Apalachee: Point of View Blog

By: Diedre Allen

Overview

Abstract

Teacher will read aloud the passage "The Apalachee" as students follow along. After reading they will discuss how the Apalachee lived (i.e., how they obtained food and shelter) and what happened to the Apalachee that led to their elimination. As a class, create a shared writing blog entry from the point of view of a Apalachee Indian. The blog entry should include details about how a Apalachee child spent a day. Within the blog entry the details about how Apalachee lived should be evident. After the whole-class shared writing activity, students will add an entry to the blog from the point of view of a tribe member; students can chose to write from the point of view of a child or adult. Students will also be expected to respond to other students' posts on the blog.

Keywords: Apalachee; Native Americans; blog; point of view

Objectives

1. Students will be able to describe the life of a Apalachee Indian.
2. Students will be able to write a journal entry from the point of view of a Apalachee Indian.
3. Students will be able to create a blog entry on the class's Apalachee Indian blog page.
4. Students will be able to respond to blog entries on the class's Apalachee Indian blog page.

Standards

Nonfiction: The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the elements of a variety of non-fiction, informational, and expository texts to demonstrate an understanding of the information presented. (LA.4.2.2)
The student will:
2. use information from the text to answer questions related to explicitly stated main ideas or relevant details; (LA.4.2.2.2)
3. organize information to show an understanding of main ideas within a text through charting, mapping, or summarizing; (LA.4.2.2.3)

Lesson

Academic Preparation

1. Students need to know how to use the computer to type and post entries on a blog. This can be taught during the shared writing lesson (Procedure #2 below).
2. Students need to have knowledge of journal entries; the teacher can introduce journal entries and blogs during the shared writing part of the lesson.

Procedures

1. The teacher will read aloud the passage "The Apalachee" (available at the link below) as students follow along. Students should have a copy of the passage.
2. After reading the class will discuss how the Apalachee lived (i.e., how they obtained food and shelter) and what happened to the Apalachee that led to their elimination. This information is provided in the passage. The teacher should model how to go back into the text to find the information.
3. As a class, create a shared writing blog entry from the point of view of a Apalachee Indian. The blog entry should include details about how a Apalachee child spent a day. Within the blog entry the details about how Apalachee Indians lived should be evident.
4. After the whole-class shared writing activity, students will add an entry to the class's Apalachee blog from the point of view of a tribe member; students can chose to write from the point of view of a child or adult.
5. After students complete their blog post they will be expected to respond to other students' posts on the blog.

Assessment

1. The teacher will assess students' participation in the shared writing lesson.
2. The teacher will assess students' blog post based on their point of view of a Apalachee Indian. Students' posts should include relevant details about the life of a Apalachee.
3. The teacher will assess students' responses to other posts based on the student's language use; it should be from the same point of view as their original post.
4. The students will complete the FCAT style questions available at the link below.

Extensions and Adaptations

Adaptations:
1. Students can create a paper journal instead of a blog page.
Extensions:
1. Students can respond to additional blog posts.

Estimated Lesson Duration

1hr 30min

Citations

  • http://fcit.usf.edu/florida/lessons/cur.htm#apalachee

Weblinks