While the ePub standard was created with text documents in mind, the Pages program on the Mac can create ePub documents with embedded images. However, the current version of Pages (Pages ’09) does not allow for alternative text to be added to each image in an ePub document. Without alternative text, someone accessing the ePub document on an iPad with the iBooks app and the VoiceOver screen reader will hear the file name of each image, instead of a more useful description. This tutorial will demonstrate a technique for adding alternative text to ePub documents exported from Pages. This will make the documents more accessible to those who rely on VoiceOver to have ebooks read aloud to them on the iPad.

ePub is a standard for digital publishing maintained by the International Digital Publishing Forum (IPDF). For more information about this standard, visit http://idpf.org/epub. The ePub format is intended for the creation of ebooks with reflowable text. Pages, the word processing and page layout program included in the iWorks suite for the Mac, has an export to ePub feature that makes it easy to publish documents in ePub format. These documents can be opened with the free iBooks app from Apple on any IOS mobile device. iBooks has many accessibility features for people with print disabilities, including resizable fonts and support for the VoiceOver screen reader built into IOS.

iBooks is the free ebook reader app from Apple that works on any IOS device. iBooks includes support for resizing text and changing the font and background to make text easier to read for people with print disabilities. It also includes a built-in dictionary, highlighting and notes to support active reading strategies. This tutorial covers the instructional supports built into iBooks.

There has been some debate in the web accessibility community as to whether it is a good practice to provide text resizing widgets on web pages. One opinion on this topic is that users should learn how to resize the text using the zoom options provided by the web browser, as not every web page will have text resize widgets. In this tutorial, you will learn how to zoom the text and layout in the most popular Windows web browsers: Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Google Chrome.

There has been some debate in the web accessibility community as to whether it is a good practice to provide text resizing widgets on web pages. One opinion on this topic is that users should learn how to resize the text using the zoom options provided by the web browser, as not every web page will have text resize widgets. In this tutorial, you will learn how to zoom the text and layout in the most popular Mac web browsers: Safari, Firefox, and Google Chrome.

Using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), Dreamweaver will let you adjust the font type, text size, and line-height in your web documents. This tutorial will show you how to adjust the text settings in Dreamweaver to make the body text in your web pages easier to read.

Reading on a computer screen is not the same as reading on paper. Reading on a computer screen tends to be slower and more tiring on the eyes, but by paying attention to a few elements of typography you can make it easier to read your content online.

TextEdit, the text editor built into Mac OS X, includes a text to speech feature that will read back any text you type into the editor. Using the Services feature built into Mac OS X, you can use the text to speech built into TextEdit to create a recording of your text you can play in iTunes or on your iPod.

Bookmark and Share