The reading order of a PDF document determines how the document will be read aloud with a screen reader.

You can fix PDF documents that have not been properly tagged during the export from Microsoft Word by adding the tags with Adobe Acrobat.

Adobe Acrobat includes a number of checks that will help you determine how well your PDF documents meet accessibility guidelines. There are two kinds of checks you can perform on your documents: a quick check, and more detailed full check.

The key to creating a more accessible PDF document is to begin with a good source document in your word processing program. The five tips presented in this tutorial will allow you to create more accessible PDFs by adding accessibility features to your Microsoft Word documents before they are exported to the PDF format.

The Cynthia Says website is a free service that allows you to check your website for Section 508 compliance. Section 508 is the U.S. accessibility law that applies to all websites maintained by the federal government and its contractors. While private websites are not required to comply with Section 508, many of them still use Section 508 as a good overall measure of accessibility.

The Juicy Studio website has a Readability Test that will allow you to check the reading level of your website. By making sure the reading level matches the needs of your target audience, you can meet the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines requirement for understandable content.

Jakob Nielsen is a respected usability expert whose research has focused on all aspects of web usability, including how people read online content. In his Alertbox column (http://www.useit.com/alertbox/), Nielsen has reported on research showing that people with low literacy “plow” through online content, reading it one line at a time. This tutorial covers some of Nielsen’s guidelines for improving the readability of online content for people with low literacy.

Jakob Nielsen is a respected usability expert whose research has focused on all aspects of web usability, including how people read online content. In a 1997 post on his Alertbox website, Nielsen reported on research showing most people scan online content rather than read it word for word. This tutorial covers some of the implications of that research for accessibility.

By aligning form elements and their labels, you can make a form easier to understand for people with cognitive disabilities. The use of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) for layout is a best practice in modern web design. In this tutorial, you will learn how to improve form usability by using only CSS to align form elements and labels.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to change the background of form elements when they receive focus on your web page. This behavior makes it easier for keyboard users to know where they are in the form as they press the Tab key to navigate the items on the form. It can also be a helpful visual indicator for people with cognitive disabilities.

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