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The Pink Fairy Book

The Princess in the Chest

by Andrew Lang

A king is determined to have a child, so his queen sees an old woman who helps her to bear a child through enchantment. There are limitations—the king and queen cannot see their child until she is fourteen. The king decides to break this rule of the contract, and the princess dies. He is then forced to put her body in the church with a sentinel standing guard. However, finding a sentinel starts to become a challenge when those who volunteer disappear. A young smith who wishes to show his bravery is the first to last the night, and his drunken bravery earns him rewards.

Wuthering Heights

Chapter 6

by Emily Brontë

Hindley returns for his father's funeral and brings home his wife, Frances, who both disregard Catherine and Heathcliff, until they disappear one day. Upon their return, Hindley threatens Heathcliff with banishment if he ever speaks to Catherine again.

The Sea-Wolf

Chapter 20

by Jack London

After the storms dies down, Maud Brewster joins the sailors for the evening meal, where she makes a request of Captain Larsen. Hump and Maud, having recognized each other as peers, engage in conversation as an agitated Captain Laren looks on.

Jane Eyre

Chapter XXXVII

by Charlotte Brontë

Jane goes to Ferndean. From a distance, she sees Rochester reach a hand out of the door, testing for rain. His body looks the same, but his face is desperate and disconsolate. Rochester returns inside, and Jane approaches the house. She knocks, and Mary answers the door. Inside, Jane carries a tray to Rochester, who is unable to see her. When he realizes that Jane is in the room with him, he thinks she must be a ghost or spirit speaking to him. When he catches her hand, he takes her in his arms, and she promises never to leave him. The next morning they walk through the woods, and Jane tells Rochester about her experiences the previous year. She has to assure him that she is not in love with St. John. He asks her again to marry him, and she says yes—they are now free from the specter of Bertha Mason. Rochester tells Jane that a few nights earlier, in a moment of desperation, he called out her name and thought he heard her answer. She does not wish to upset him or excite him in his fragile condition, and so she does not tell him about hearing his voice at Moor House.

The House of the Seven Gables

Chapter XX: “The Flower of Eden”

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Phoebe is pulled into the house by Holgrave. After telling her about the Judge, he says he has not gone to the police for fear of implicating Hepzibah and Clifford. He reminds Phoebe that the death of the Judge resemble the death of Uncle Jaffrey, who’s murder was blamed on Clifford thanks to the Judge. Holgrave tells Phoebe he loves her and she reveals her feelings as well. Hepzibah and Clifford return to the house.

Main Street

Chapter 26

by Sinclair Lewis

Will diagnoses the Bjornstams illness as typhoid. Carol agrees to assist Bea and Olaf as they recover from their illness. Vida, Maud, and the minister's wife are turned away from the Bjornstams' home. A tragedy in the Bjornstams home prompts Miles to depart for Canada.

Main Street

Chapter 7

by Sinclair Lewis

With the arrival of winter, Carol attempts to create some distraction for herself and the townspeople. Carol's treatment of her maid is a source of tension with the members of the Jolly Seventeen.

Jane Eyre

Chapter XXII

by Charlotte Brontë

Jane remains at Gateshead for a month because Georgiana dreads being left alone with Eliza, with whom she does not get along. Eventually, Georgiana goes to London to live with her uncle, and Eliza joins a convent in France. Jane tells us that Eliza eventually becomes the Mother Superior of her convent, while Georgiana marries a wealthy man. At Gateshead, Jane receives a letter from Mrs. Fairfax, which says that Rochester’s guests have departed and that Rochester has gone to London to buy a new carriage—a sure sign of his intention to marry Blanche. As Jane travels toward Thornfield, she anxiously anticipates seeing Rochester again, and yet she worries about what will become of her after his marriage. To her surprise, as she walks from the station at Millcote, Jane encounters Rochester. When he asks her why she has stayed away from Thornfield so long, she replies, still a bit bewildered, “I have been with my aunt, sir, who is dead.” Rochester asks Jane whether she has heard about his new carriage, and he tells her: “You must see the carriage, Jane, and tell me if you don?t think it will suit Mrs. Rochester exactly.” After a few more words together, Jane surprises herself by expressing the happiness she feels in Rochester’s presence: “I am strangely glad to get back again to you; and wherever you are is my home—my only home.” Back at the manor, Mrs. Fairfax, Adele, and the servants greet Jane warmly.