The Mythological Creatures includes 33 illustrations of unicorns, dragons, and other creatures from ancient mythology.

"A mystical word used by the Gnostic followers of Basilides to denote the Supreme Being, or, perhaps, its 365 emanations collectively, or the 365 orders of spirits occupying the 365 heavens."-Whitney, 1902

Abraxas

"A mystical word used by the Gnostic followers of Basilides to denote the Supreme Being, or, perhaps,…

A legendary reptile reputed to be king of serpents and said to have power of causing death by a single glance.

Basilisk

A legendary reptile reputed to be king of serpents and said to have power of causing death by a single…

An illustration of a centaur and man standing on the shore of a lake.

Centaur & Man Standing on Shore

An illustration of a centaur and man standing on the shore of a lake.

The Roman Chimaera is found in the Vatican.

Roman Chimaera

The Roman Chimaera is found in the Vatican.

The mythological cockatrice.

Cockatrice

The mythological cockatrice.

The national god of the Philistines, represented as formed of the upper part of a man and the lower part of a fish.

Dagon

The national god of the Philistines, represented as formed of the upper part of a man and the lower…

Dolphin borrowed from mythology.

Dolphin

Dolphin borrowed from mythology.

The mythological Dragon.

Dragon

The mythological Dragon.

An illustration of a baby dragon crying.

Baby Dragon Crying

An illustration of a baby dragon crying.

An illustration of a dragon holding a knight and a horse in his claw.

Dragon Holding Knight & Horse in Claw

An illustration of a dragon holding a knight and a horse in his claw.

An illustration of a mother dragon caring for her baby dragons.

Mother Dragon with Baby Dragons

An illustration of a mother dragon caring for her baby dragons.

In heraldry, the griffin is a fabulous animal, with the head and forefeet of an eagle, and the body, hind legs, and tail of a lion. The head is represented with pricked ears, symbolical of its vigilance. In mythology, the griffin was a creature similar in form to the griffin of heraldry, which was supposed to find its especial function in watching over hidden treasure, especially in Scythia. It was dedicated to the sun-god Apollo, whose chariot appears in early art as drawn by griffins. It was a favorite ornamental 'theme' in ancient Babylonian and Persian art, and is also found in a similar way on art objects of the Phoenicians, the Mycenæan civilization, and the ancient Greeks. The Romans and art-workers of the renaissance used it as a purely decorative device.

Griffin

In heraldry, the griffin is a fabulous animal, with the head and forefeet of an eagle, and the body,…

The Greek Griffin is associated with Antiquity and fire, usually appears on Candelabras and friezes. The Griffin has the body of a Lion and the head and wings of an Eagle.

Greek Griffin

The Greek Griffin is associated with Antiquity and fire, usually appears on Candelabras and friezes.…

The Renaissance Griffin is associated with Antiquity and fire, it appears on Candelabras and friezes. The Griffin has the body of a Lion and the head and wings of an Eagle.

Griffin Renaissance

The Renaissance Griffin is associated with Antiquity and fire, it appears on Candelabras and friezes.…

The Roman Griffin has the body of a Lion and the head and wings of an Eagle. The Griffin is usually associated with Antiquity and fire, and appears on Candelabras and friezes.

Roman Griffin

The Roman Griffin has the body of a Lion and the head and wings of an Eagle. The Griffin is usually…

The Sitting Griffin is used as a support of a seat in the Castle of Gaillon during the French Renaissance.

Sitting Griffin

The Sitting Griffin is used as a support of a seat in the Castle of Gaillon during the French Renaissance.

The griffon is a mythological creature with a lions body and head and wings of an eagle.

Griffon

The griffon is a mythological creature with a lions body and head and wings of an eagle.

Harpy, depicted as a bird with a female face.

Harpy

Harpy, depicted as a bird with a female face.

Hercules slaying the Hydra, from sculpture at Florence

Hercules

Hercules slaying the Hydra, from sculpture at Florence

The idol Juggernaut.

Idol

The idol Juggernaut.

In Greek mythology, Maenads were the female followers of Dionysus, the most significant members of the Thiasus, the retinue of Dionysus. Their name literally translates as "raving ones". Often the maenads were portrayed as inspired by him into a state of ecstatic frenzy, through a combination of dancing and drunken intoxication.

Maenads

In Greek mythology, Maenads were the female followers of Dionysus, the most significant members of the…

Monsters supposed to live in the ocean as drawn on old maps

Monsters

Monsters supposed to live in the ocean as drawn on old maps

"The name of a Babylonian god, who, in the first year of the foundation of Babylon, is said to have come out of the Persian Gulf, or the old Erythraean Sea, adjoining Babylon. He is described as having the head and body of a fish, to which were added a human head and feet under the fish's head and at the sail. He lived amongst men during the daytime, without, however, taking any food, and retired at sunset to the sea, from which he had emerged." — Chambers, 1881

Oannes

"The name of a Babylonian god, who, in the first year of the foundation of Babylon, is said to have…

Ondines or undines are elementals, enumerated as the water elementals in works of alchemy by Paracelsus. They also appear in European folklore as fairy-like creatures; the name may be used interchangeably with those of other water spirits. Undines were said to be able to gain a soul by marrying a human and bearing his child. Undine A water nymph without a soul, which she later received by marrying a mortal and bearing a child: Heroine of a book (1812) by Baron Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué, German author.

Ondine

Ondines or undines are elementals, enumerated as the water elementals in works of alchemy by Paracelsus.…

Pan in Greek religion and mythology, is the companion of the nymphs, god of shepherds and flocks, of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music. His name originates within the Greek language, from the word paein, meaning "to pasture". He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr. With his homeland in rustic Arcadia, he is recognized as the god of fields, groves, and wooded glens; because of this, Pan is connected to fertility and the season of spring.

Pan

Pan in Greek religion and mythology, is the companion of the nymphs, god of shepherds and flocks, of…

A walrus like sea monster which climbed cliffs to feed on dew.

Rosmarine

A walrus like sea monster which climbed cliffs to feed on dew.

Sphinx

Sphinx

Sphinx

An illustration of a unicorn.

Unicorn

An illustration of a unicorn.

Unicorn, from the nursery rhyme, "The Lion and the Unicorn."

Unicorn

Unicorn, from the nursery rhyme, "The Lion and the Unicorn."

The unicorn is a mythological creature usually depicted as a white horse with a slender horn atop its head.

Unicorn

The unicorn is a mythological creature usually depicted as a white horse with a slender horn atop its…

An illustration of a unicorn pulling a cart.

Unicorns Pulling Cart

An illustration of a unicorn pulling a cart.

A wyvern is a type of dragon used in heraldry that has only two legs like those of an eagle.

Wyvern

A wyvern is a type of dragon used in heraldry that has only two legs like those of an eagle.

The mythological wyvern.

Wyvern

The mythological wyvern.