The 1861-1865 Civil War Other Events ClipArt gallery includes 133 illustrations of other important events that occurred during the American Civil War.

"General Lee singing the Terms of Surrender at Appomattox court-house."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Terms of Surrender

"General Lee singing the Terms of Surrender at Appomattox court-house."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

"The landing of the Allied Troops at Vera Cruz."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Vera Cruz

"The landing of the Allied Troops at Vera Cruz."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Surrender of Vicksburg

Vicksburg

Surrender of Vicksburg

"The siege of Vicksburg. General Grant meeting the Confederate General Pemberton at the Stone House, inside the Confederate works, on the morning of July 4th, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Vicksburg

"The siege of Vicksburg. General Grant meeting the Confederate General Pemberton at the Stone House,…

"Siege of Charleston, S. C.- Federal sharpshooters approaching Fort Wagner before the avacuation."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Wagner

"Siege of Charleston, S. C.- Federal sharpshooters approaching Fort Wagner before the avacuation."—…

"Landing of United States troops at Fort Walker, after the bombardment, November 7th, 1861. In order to establish a naval rendezvous where vessels on the way to or from blockading squadrons could coal and take refuge in case of need, it was decided by the Federal authorities to capture the entrance to Port Royal, South Carolina. A large expedition was fitted out, and after a heavy bombardment of about four hours, signal was given that the two forts, Walker and Beauregard, had been abandoned. When the Federal troops landed at Fort Walker they found numbers of dead and dying amidst dismounted guns in all directions, and the hospital building shot through and through in many places. The loss on the fleet was 8 killed and 23 wounded."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Walker

"Landing of United States troops at Fort Walker, after the bombardment, November 7th, 1861. In order…

"White House Landing, Pamunkey River, Va., the Grand Depot of the Commissariat and Ordinance Department of the army before Richmond. White House Landing, on the Pamunkey River, was the grand depot of General McClellan's army, and from it there was a constant communications with Fortress Monroe and Washington. It derived its name from the house in the centre of the sketch, the residence of Mrs. Custis before she became the wife of George Washington."— Frank Leslie, 1896

White House Landing

"White House Landing, Pamunkey River, Va., the Grand Depot of the Commissariat and Ordinance Department…

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position at the White House, and breaking up the commisariat depot on the Pamunkey River- departure of the Union flortilla for the James River, June 26th, 1862. The Confederate raid of Stuart's cavalry at Garlick's Landing and Tunstall's Station had struck the occupants of the White House Landing with a deep sense of insecurity; and, consequently, when they received orders on Wednesday, June 25th, to prepare for the hasty removal of all the government stores, they set to work with great activity, and by Thursday the greater portion of the heavy stores were embarked on board the numerous transports lying in the river. Unfortunately, through some accident the White house took fire, and the house of Washington's wife was soon destroyed." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of the White House

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position…

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position at the White House, and breaking up the commisariat depot on the Pamunkey River- departure of the Union flortilla for the James River, June 26th, 1862. The Confederate raid of Stuart's cavalry at Garlick's Landing and Tunstall's Station had struck the occupants of the White House Landing with a deep sense of insecurity; and, consequently, when they received orders on Wednesday, June 25th, to prepare for the hasty removal of all the government stores, they set to work with great activity, and by Thursday the greater portion of the heavy stores were embarked on board the numerous transports lying in the river. Unfortunately, through some accident the White house took fire, and the house of Washington's wife was soon destroyed." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of the White House

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position…

General Sherman's march to the sea in the Civil War.

William Sherman

General Sherman's march to the sea in the Civil War.

Soldiers outside a few tents.

Winter Scene in Camp

Soldiers outside a few tents.

"The ('Billy') Wilson Zouaves, at Tammany Hall, taking the oath of fidelity to the flag, April 24th, 1861. Colonel Wilson was among the first to offer his services to the government on the breaking out of the war. He recruited a regiment of nearly twelve hundred men from the rowdy and criminal classes of New York city. The regiment was formally mustered in the old Tammany Hall, and there, on April 24th, with the men arranged around the room, with the officers in the centre, the colonel, with a sword in one hand and the American flag in the other, led the men into swearing to 'support the flag and never to flinch from its path through blood or death.' The Zouaves, a few days afterward, left for the South."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Billy Wilson Zouaves

"The ('Billy') Wilson Zouaves, at Tammany Hall, taking the oath of fidelity to the flag, April 24th,…

"The departure of Colonel Ellsworth's Zouaves from New york, escorted by the fire department- the regiment and escort passing the corner of Broadway and Canal Street, April 29th, 1861. The Fire Zouaves, under command of Colonel Ellsworth, mustering over eleven hundred strong, embarked on board the <em>Baltic</em>, on Monday, April 29th, 1861, amid a most enthusiastic ovation. Chosen from so popular a corps as the firemen of New York, they could not fail to arouse public sympathy to a large extent. As it was generally known that three separate stands of colors would be presented to them- one at their barracks, another by Mrs. Astor, and the third at the Astor House by Mr. Stetson- an immense crowd attended every movement of this gallant regiment. The first flag was presented by Mr. Wickham, on behalf of the Fire Department and Common Council. The Hon. J. A. Dix then, in behalf of Mrs. Augusta Astor, presented them with another stand of colors, with a very handsome letter from the fair donor. The regiment then marched through Bond Street, the Bowery and Chatham Street to the Astor House, where Mr. Stetson presented them with a third flag in the name of the ladies of the house. After a short soldierly response from the colonel, the regiment with their noble escort, marched to the foot of Canal Street, where they embarked on board the <em>Baltic</em>, which steamed down the river on her way to Annapolis." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Ellsworth's Zouaves

"The departure of Colonel Ellsworth's Zouaves from New york, escorted by the fire department- the regiment…