The 1861-1865 Civil War Places ClipArt gallery offers 182 illustrations of places that are famous due to battles or other events during the American Civil War.

The headquarters of Major Robert Anderson at Fort Sumter, South Carolina during the American Civil War.

Major Anderson's Headquarters

The headquarters of Major Robert Anderson at Fort Sumter, South Carolina during the American Civil War.

Union soldiers being held at Andersonville, a Confederate prison.

Union Prisoners Confined at the Confederate Prison at Andersonville

Union soldiers being held at Andersonville, a Confederate prison.

Shows empty rural area, with a column of troops moving over a bridge.

Battlefield of Antietam

Shows empty rural area, with a column of troops moving over a bridge.

At the time this picture was drawn the handsome arsenal of the government of Charleston, South Carolina, was an object of great interest. An immense amount of ammunition was stored there, and raids upon it were expected at any moment. It was watched and guarded with great care by detachments of the Washington Light Infantry. It was afterward seized by the State authorities on December 28, 1860.

United States Arsenal at Charleston

At the time this picture was drawn the handsome arsenal of the government of Charleston, South Carolina,…

"General Banks's headquarters near Edward's Ferry, Md." —Leslie, 1896

Headquarters of Banks

"General Banks's headquarters near Edward's Ferry, Md." —Leslie, 1896

"Gettysburg Battlefield"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battlefield

"Gettysburg Battlefield"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Beauregard, at Bay Point, on the point opposite Fort Walker, was built of sand and palmetto logs on a sand spit on the extreme southerly end of Hunting Island. The work on the harbor or sea front was what is termed a lunette, and mounted twelve guns. To the right of this lunette was a small salient mounting three guns, and to the left, a small work, or redan, mounting two guns. In the work was a large magazine which, when captured by the Frederal Troops, contained one thousand five hundred rounds of fixed ammunition, and in the wet ditch were large quantities of loose powder, destroyed by the Confederates before they evacuated the fort.

Interior View of Fort Beauregard

Fort Beauregard, at Bay Point, on the point opposite Fort Walker, was built of sand and palmetto logs…

"View of Richmond, Va., from the prison camp at Belle Isle, James River. Belle Island is situated in the James River, a little above the bridge which connects the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad. It is about an acre and a half, and in this small space there were on an average ten thousand Federal soldiers imprisoned and slowly tortured. The Confederate capital has been so often described that we shall confine ourselves to the special view before us. The prominent building is the Capitol; the five churches on the left are St. Paul's, First Baptist, St. James's, Second Baptist and Grace Street Methodist; the large building at the end of the bridge is Haxall's flouring mill, the largest one of the kind in the world, being thirteen stories high."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Belle Isle

"View of Richmond, Va., from the prison camp at Belle Isle, James River. Belle Island is situated in…

"View of the fortifications erected by the Federal troops at Bird's Point, MO., opposite Cairo, Ill."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bird's Point

"View of the fortifications erected by the Federal troops at Bird's Point, MO., opposite Cairo, Ill."—…

The angle between the Union II and VI Corps became known as the "Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania", where perhaps some of the most savage fighting of the whole Civil War took place.

Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania

The angle between the Union II and VI Corps became known as the "Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania", where…

"Drury's Bluff, a Confederate position on the James River, near Richmond, Va. The principal Confederate defense of Richmond was Fort Darling, a heavy work on a high bank called Drury's Bluff, eight miles below Richmond. Here the river was closed with heavy piling and vessels loaded with stone sunk in the channel. The work was casemated and mounted with heavy guns. It will be remembered that the Federal ironclads, the <em>Galena</em> and the <em>Monitor</em>, were repulsed here during the progress of the Peninsular campaign. The <em>Monitor</em> was unable to elevate her guns sufficiently to reach the works, and the sides of the <em>Galena</em> were not thick enough to resist the plunging shot from the fort, which struck its sides at right angles. The <em>Naugatuck</em>, the only other vessel engaged in the assault, burst her single gun on the second discharge."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Drury's Bluff

"Drury's Bluff, a Confederate position on the James River, near Richmond, Va. The principal Confederate…

"The Federal siege works on Bogue Island, N. C., erected for the reduction of Fort Macon. Our sketch represents the covering of the working parties while constructing Captain Morris's Parrot-gun siege batteries on Bogue Island. Our correspondent said: 'Colonel White sometimes beguiles his leisure moments by throwing shells promiscuously about the sand spit upon which our works are located, doubtless to ascertain the exact position of the batteries and to annoy the working parties. The proceedings on such occasions are of the serio-comic order. At the word 'drop,' given by the sentinel in the 'rat hole' at the top of the sand hill upon seeing the flash from the gun at the fort, every man makes a bee-line at the double quick for the nearest cover, assuming a position as near the horizontal as possible. This gives comparative immunity from danger, and up to this time nobody has been hurt, except by falling pieces of shells which have exploded overhead.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bogue Island

"The Federal siege works on Bogue Island, N. C., erected for the reduction of Fort Macon. Our sketch…

The bridge played a key role in the September 1862 Battle of Antietam during the American Civil War when a small number of Confederate soldiers from Georgia for several hours held off repeated attempts by elements of the Union Army to take the bridge by force.

"Burnside Bridge," Antietam Creek

The bridge played a key role in the September 1862 Battle of Antietam during the American Civil War…

"Sherman's Campaign. The capture of Buzzard's Roost at Hovey Gap, Ga., May 8th, 1864. Among the strongholds selected by the Confederates for the defense of Atlanta against the Federals was Buzzard's Roost, carried in spite of all their endeavors, on the 8th of May, by the indomitable courage of Sherman's men. It is a high, rocky elevation on Mill Creek, a branch of the Oostanaula, between Ringgold and Dalton. Our artist said: 'Our advance engaged in some very heavy skirmishing, which lasted for several hours. At first our lines were slowly forced back by the vastly superior numbers of the enemy, who resisted with a stubborn desperation our attempted advance. From out their long lines of concealed rifle-pits they showered their leaden messengers of death with terrible effect upon our troops. A charge was finally ordered, and then ensued one of those furious encounters that can only occur in a hand-to-hand conflict. They drove the Confederates from the fortress, leaving only the dead and wounded in their rifle-pits.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Buzzard's Roost

"Sherman's Campaign. The capture of Buzzard's Roost at Hovey Gap, Ga., May 8th, 1864. Among the strongholds…

"Fort Calhoun, on the ripraps, situated between Fortress Monroe and Sewell's Point, in Hampton Roads, Va."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Calhoun

"Fort Calhoun, on the ripraps, situated between Fortress Monroe and Sewell's Point, in Hampton Roads,…

"Camp Dennison, sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on the banks of the Miami River, General Cox commanding- the Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus Railroad passed directly through the camp grounds. This camp, which was organized for a camp of instruction and drill, was situated about sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on a field of seventy-five acres, on the banks of the Miami River, surrounded by high bluffs. The Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus Railroad passed directly through the grounds, and this road was guarded for miles by sentries in order to watch bridges, telegraph wires and culverts, as spies were infesting the whole country. There were 18,000 men in camp, including the splendid Kentucky Regiment of Guthrie Grays, and quarters were erected for 20,000 men, who were soon on the ground. The tents were rough-board shanties, but were comfortable, and the officers had marquees erected in the rear of the regimental quarters. This brigade was under the command of General Cox, a West Point officer, and under the immediate supvervision of General George B. McClellan. It was in a beautiful location, and the troops were kept under a very strict surveillance, there being but few spectators allowed to visit the ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Camp Dennison

"Camp Dennison, sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on the banks of the Miami River, General Cox commanding-…

"Bird's-eye view of Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill., used for the detention of Confederate prisoners in 1862. At the commencement of the Civil War, in 1861, a Camp of Instruction was formed near Chicago, which, in honor of the 'Little Giant,' was called Camp Douglas. Here many of the Western regiments were drilled to that state of efficiency which has borne such glorious fruits as the victories of Fort Donelson and Pittsburg Landing. In the latter part of 1862 it was converted into a prison for Confederate prisoners, over eight thousand having been confined there at one time. They were chiefly Alabamians, Mississippians and Texans. Our sketch shows the vast barracks erected on the drill grounds in 1862."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Camp Douglas

"Bird's-eye view of Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill., used for the detention of Confederate prisoners in…

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861. This spot, where Fremont's army rested after their first day's march from Tipton, is on the vast prairies of Missouri, about fifteen miles from Tipton and two miles from Wheatland. The Grand Army of the West here pitched their tents on the afternoon of the 14th of October, 1861. A brilliant sunset fell over the whole, which looked more like a monster picnic than the advanced corps of an army bent on the destruction of traitorous brothers. The rapidity with which the evening's meal for a marching regiment is prepared has something of the marvelous in it. Appetite quickens practice, and the air is soon filled with the savory aromas of culinary processes. Then comes the hearty enjoyment of food which at another time would be passed by, but which now, under the appetizing provocative of hunger, is thankfully received. Not the least of a soldier's trials is the inroad a long march and privation makes upon that fastidiousness which plenty to eat engenders in the human diaphragm. The camp was called after the colonel of General Fremont's bodyguard, whose gallant achievements at Springfield on the 25th of October we have recorded." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Camp Zagonyi

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861.…

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861. This spot, where Fremont's army rested after their first day's march from Tipton, is on the vast prairies of Missouri, about fifteen miles from Tipton and two miles from Wheatland. The Grand Army of the West here pitched their tents on the afternoon of the 14th of October, 1861. A brilliant sunset fell over the whole, which looked more like a monster picnic than the advanced corps of an army bent on the destruction of traitorous brothers. The rapidity with which the evening's meal for a marching regiment is prepared has something of the marvelous in it. Appetite quickens practice, and the air is soon filled with the savory aromas of culinary processes. Then comes the hearty enjoyment of food which at another time would be passed by, but which now, under the appetizing provocative of hunger, is thankfully received. Not the least of a soldier's trials is the inroad a long march and privation makes upon that fastidiousness which plenty to eat engenders in the human diaphragm. The camp was called after the colonel of General Fremont's bodyguard, whose gallant achievements at Springfield on the 25th of October we have recorded." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Camp Zagonyi

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861.…

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861. This spot, where Fremont's army rested after their first day's march from Tipton, is on the vast prairies of Missouri, about fifteen miles from Tipton and two miles from Wheatland. The Grand Army of the West here pitched their tents on the afternoon of the 14th of October, 1861. A brilliant sunset fell over the whole, which looked more like a monster picnic than the advanced corps of an army bent on the destruction of traitorous brothers. The rapidity with which the evening's meal for a marching regiment is prepared has something of the marvelous in it. Appetite quickens practice, and the air is soon filled with the savory aromas of culinary processes. Then comes the hearty enjoyment of food which at another time would be passed by, but which now, under the appetizing provocative of hunger, is thankfully received. Not the least of a soldier's trials is the inroad a long march and privation makes upon that fastidiousness which plenty to eat engenders in the human diaphragm. The camp was called after the colonel of General Fremont's bodyguard, whose gallant achievements at Springfield on the 25th of October we have recorded." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Camp Zagonyi

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861.…

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861. This spot, where Fremont's army rested after their first day's march from Tipton, is on the vast prairies of Missouri, about fifteen miles from Tipton and two miles from Wheatland. The Grand Army of the West here pitched their tents on the afternoon of the 14th of October, 1861. A brilliant sunset fell over the whole, which looked more like a monster picnic than the advanced corps of an army bent on the destruction of traitorous brothers. The rapidity with which the evening's meal for a marching regiment is prepared has something of the marvelous in it. Appetite quickens practice, and the air is soon filled with the savory aromas of culinary processes. Then comes the hearty enjoyment of food which at another time would be passed by, but which now, under the appetizing provocative of hunger, is thankfully received. Not the least of a soldier's trials is the inroad a long march and privation makes upon that fastidiousness which plenty to eat engenders in the human diaphragm. The camp was called after the colonel of General Fremont's bodyguard, whose gallant achievements at Springfield on the 25th of October we have recorded." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Camp Zagonyi

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861.…

"The war in Mississippi- General McPherson driving the enemy from their position on the Canton Road, near Brownsville."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Canton Road

"The war in Mississippi- General McPherson driving the enemy from their position on the Canton Road,…

Castle Thunder, one of the Confederate prisons known for its abominable conditions.

Castle Thunder, Richmond, VA, Where Union Prisoners Were Confined

Castle Thunder, one of the Confederate prisons known for its abominable conditions.

Castle Thunder, located in Richmond, Virginia, was a former tobacco warehouse located on Tobacco Row, converted into a prison used by the Confederacy to house civilian prisoners, including captured Union spies, political prisoners and those charged with treason during the American Civil War.

Castle Thunder

Castle Thunder, located in Richmond, Virginia, was a former tobacco warehouse located on Tobacco Row,…

"View of the town of Centreville, Va., with the battlefield of Bull Run, Bull Run Mountains, Thoroughfare Gap, and the Blue Ridge in the distance. An undying interest centres around the field of Bull Run, so often the scene of battle, skirmish and military operations. The ground dyed with the blood of so many thousand American soldiers, where some of the mightiest armies have met in deadly strife, will long show, in its broken outlines, in its ruined dwellings, in its grass-grown earthworks, and in its sadder graves and unburied remains of mortality, the traces of war. We give a view of Centreville, with a battery of the Third Connecticut Heavy Artillery in the foreground, their caissons and shelter tents beside the grassy mound that marks the intrenchments thrown up by the Confederates in the fall and winter of 1861. The village of Centreville lies to the right, the battle ground of Bull Run lies beyond the last two houses on the right, and still further in the background are the Bull Run Mountains, divided opposite the last house by Thoroughfare Gap, and in the remote distance looms up the Blue Ridge."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Centreville

"View of the town of Centreville, Va., with the battlefield of Bull Run, Bull Run Mountains, Thoroughfare…

An illustration of the ruins of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Chambersburg

An illustration of the ruins of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

The Battle of Chancellorsville was a major battle of the American Civil War, fought near the village of Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, from April 30 to May 6, 1863.

Ruins of Chancellorsville

The Battle of Chancellorsville was a major battle of the American Civil War, fought near the village…

A view of Charleston, South Carolina during the Civil War.

Charleston During the Civil War

A view of Charleston, South Carolina during the Civil War.

"The harbor of Charleston, S. C.- Fort Moultrie, on Sullivan's Island."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Charleston Harbor

"The harbor of Charleston, S. C.- Fort Moultrie, on Sullivan's Island."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The advance upon Charleston, S. C.- entrance to the Stono River."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Advance upon Charleston

"The advance upon Charleston, S. C.- entrance to the Stono River."— Frank Leslie, 1896

An illustration of Charleston, South Carolina during the Civil War.

Charleston, South Carolina

An illustration of Charleston, South Carolina during the Civil War.

Chattanooga, "the Scenic City", is the fourth-largest city in Tennessee (after Memphis, Nashville, and Knoxville), and the seat of Hamilton County, in the United States of America. It is located in southeast Tennessee on Chickamauga and Nickajack Lake, which are both part of the Tennessee River. The city, which lies at the transition between the ridge-and-valley portion of the Appalachian Mountains and the Cumberland Plateau, is surrounded by mountains and ridges. The first inhabitants of the Chattanooga area were Native American Indians with sites dating back to the Upper Paleolithic period, showing continuous occupation through the Archaic, Woodland, Mississippian (900&ndash;1650 AD), Muskogean and Cherokee (1776 &ndash; 1838 AD) periods.

Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1862

Chattanooga, "the Scenic City", is the fourth-largest city in Tennessee (after Memphis, Nashville, and…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

"Exterior view of Fort Clinch, on Amelia Island, Fla., commanding the Harbor of Fernandina, captured by the Federal Land and Naval forces under Commodore Dupont and General Wright, March 4th, 1862. On the 4th of March, 1862, the Federal forces, under the command of Commodore Dupont and General H. G. Wright, took full possession of Fernandina, the chief, indeed almost the only, port on the Atlantic side of Florida. Fernandina is situated on the northwest part of Amelia Island, which forms part of the Atlantic seaboard of Florida. The northern and principal approach to it is through Cumberland Sound, defended by Fort Clinch, which is situated on the northwest point of Amelia Island, and about three miles north of Fernandina. Fernandina is the Atlantic terminus of the Florida Railroad, which runs to Cedar Keys, in the Gulf of Mexico. Fort Clinch is a casemated building, and by its capture and the surrounding earthworks twelve heavy guns fell into the hands of the Federals."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Clinch

"Exterior view of Fort Clinch, on Amelia Island, Fla., commanding the Harbor of Fernandina, captured…

"Interior view of Fort Clinch, on Amelia Island, Fla., commanding the Harbor of Fernandina, captured by the Federal Land and Naval forces under Commodore Dupont and General Wright, March 4th, 1862. Commodore Dupont, in speaking of the fortifications, said: 'I visited the town, Fort Clinch, and the earthworks on the sea face of the island. It is impossible to look at these preparations for a vigorous defense without being surprised that they should have been voluntarily deserted. The batteries on the north and northeast shores are as complete as art can make them. Six are well concealed, and protected by ranges of sandhills in front of them, and contain perfect shelter for the men, and are so small and thoroughly covered by the natural growth and the various contours of the land, that to strike them from the water would be the mere result of chance. A battery of six guns, though larger and affording, therefore, a better mark, is equally well sheltered and masked. These batteries, and the heavy guns mounted on Fort Clinch, commanded all the turnings of the main ship channel, and raked an approaching enemy.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Clinch

"Interior view of Fort Clinch, on Amelia Island, Fla., commanding the Harbor of Fernandina, captured…

"Appearance of the prison pen at Columbia, S. C., on the arrival of Sherman's army."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Prison Pen at Columbia

"Appearance of the prison pen at Columbia, S. C., on the arrival of Sherman's army."— Frank Leslie,…

"General view of Columbus, Ky., and its fortications, looking down the river, showing the 'Iron Bluffs' crowned with batteries, the water batteries and the arrival of the Federal gunboats, March 4th, 1862. Our sketch of Columbus and its fortifications, which was called the Western Gibraltar by the Confederates, became untenable by them after the fall of Fort Henry, Donelson, Bowling Green, and especially Nashville. A glance at our illustration will show its immense strength on the river side, and it must be confessed that General Polk had not been slow to improve its natural advantages. The water batteries entirely command the river, and to silence them would have required all Commodore Foote's gallantry and skill. Our picture represents all the water batteries which are situated about a mile above the City of Columbus. The bluffs which are also crowned with cannon, are from seventy to eighty feet high."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Columbus, Kentucky

"General view of Columbus, Ky., and its fortications, looking down the river, showing the 'Iron Bluffs'…

"Commissariat Depot of the United States Army of the Rappahannock at Manassas, Va. Our sketch shows the Federal Commissariat Depot at Manassas before the second battle of Bull Run, when Jackson by a forced march of sixty miles in thirty-five hours had at his mercy all of General Pope's most important supplies and munitions of war, and which Stuart, with a strong force of troops under Colonel Trimble, took possession of, or destroyed, on the night of August 26th, 1862. Manassas is situated on the Virginia Midland and Great Southern Railroad, thirty-three miles west southwest of Washington, and twenty-seven miles west of Alexandria. It is the junction and last terminus of the Manassas division of the same road."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Commissariat Depot

"Commissariat Depot of the United States Army of the Rappahannock at Manassas, Va. Our sketch shows…

The Battle of Chattanooga and included the Battle of Lookout Mountain on November 25, 1863 during the American Civil War.

Confederate Battery on the Top of Lookout Mountain

The Battle of Chattanooga and included the Battle of Lookout Mountain on November 25, 1863 during the…

"Ruins of Confederate fort on the southeast side of Atlanta, with chevaux-de-frise and abatis in front."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate fort

"Ruins of Confederate fort on the southeast side of Atlanta, with chevaux-de-frise and abatis in front."—…

"The Confederate Prison camp at Belle Isle, James River, Va."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate Prison Camp

"The Confederate Prison camp at Belle Isle, James River, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Culpepper Courthouse, or Fairfax, capital of Culpepper County, Va. This pretty little place, more frequently called Fairfax, in honor of Lord Fairfax, the old proprietor of the land hereabouts, is a post village on the Orange and Alexandria railroad. It is surrounded by a finely diversified and fertile country, and has many fine old-fashioned planters' seats scattered about. In 1862 it contained four churches, two newspaper offices and a Masonic Hall. Its population was about eight thousand two hundred. It was established in 1759 and incorporated in 1834. It is named Culpepper after Lord Culpepper, the English Governor of Viginia from 1703 to 1708. It is thirty miles from Fredericksburg, nearly ninety from Richmond, and twenty-six from Gordonsville. Fairfax or Culpepper was distinguished early in the war of the revolution for the services of her gallant 'minute men.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Culpepper Courthouse

"Culpepper Courthouse, or Fairfax, capital of Culpepper County, Va. This pretty little place, more frequently…

"Cumberland Gap and Heights, Tenn., from the Kentucky side. Cumberland Gap was a place of such importance during the war as to be constantly the object of operations on both sides, who indeed alternately held it. Like Harper's Ferry, it was deemed a strategic point of great value; but the fact that no action took place, and that its evacuation was compelled by distinct movements, tend to modify this idea. It is a natural gap in a mountain, 80 miles long, or rather the only natural gap, although other points bear that name. Cumberland Gap is 150 miles southeast of Lexington, Ky. The mountain is here 1,200 feet high, but the notch is a cut nearly two-thirds of this, the road through the gap being only 400 feet high. On the southern or Tennessee side this mountain is abrupt, and in some places perpendicular, and the summit almost inaccessible, except through the gap. The northern or Kentucky side is more irregular, breaking off in a sucession of smaller mountains and hills to the Valley of the Cumberland. Our sketch shows the Kentucky side."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Cumberland Gap

"Cumberland Gap and Heights, Tenn., from the Kentucky side. Cumberland Gap was a place of such importance…

"Edward's Ferry, Md., below Harrison's Island, on the Potomac River, the place of the passage of General Banks's division, October 22nd, 1861."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Edward's Ferry

"Edward's Ferry, Md., below Harrison's Island, on the Potomac River, the place of the passage of General…

"United States General Hospital at Elmira, N. Y."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Elmira Hospital

"United States General Hospital at Elmira, N. Y."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Scene in Adams Express office, at Fortress Monroe, VA., in 1861- Volunteers receiving letters and packages from home. It is only those who had relatives in camp that could tell the feverish anxiety of the troops to hear from those they had left at home. We need hardly describe a scene which so thoroughly explains itself. The name of Adams Express was a household one, both to the donor and receiver of good things sent to the absent soldier." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Adams Express

"Scene in Adams Express office, at Fortress Monroe, VA., in 1861- Volunteers receiving letters and packages…

The Battle of Seven Pines, also known as the Battle of Fair Oaks or Fair Oaks Station, took place on May 31 and June 1, 1862, in Henrico County, Virginia, as part of the Peninsula Campaign of the American Civil War.

Fair Oaks

The Battle of Seven Pines, also known as the Battle of Fair Oaks or Fair Oaks Station, took place on…

"The town of Falmouth, Va. on the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg. Headquarters of General Burnside and the army of the Potomac. Our special artist wrote us: 'Falmouth has that decaying, half sleepy look so characteristic of all Southern cities. A coat of paint is evidently the covering of a century, and the doors and windows cry out loudly for the glazier and carpenter. Falmouth is now the headquarters of General Burnside, and, being immediately opposite to Fredericksburg, will soon be the scene of most important operations. The river here is about six hundred feet wide, and is very often fordable. A mile to the east the railroad passes from Aquia Creek to Richmond. The bridge was burned lately, and has of course not been repaired, the army intending to pass over on pontoon bridges.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Falmouth

"The town of Falmouth, Va. on the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg. Headquarters of General Burnside…

"Federal Hill, Baltimore, taken from the North side basin, occupied by the Federal Troops."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Federal Hill

"Federal Hill, Baltimore, taken from the North side basin, occupied by the Federal Troops."— Frank…

"Fort on Fenwick's Island, South Edisto River, S. C."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fenwick's Island

"Fort on Fenwick's Island, South Edisto River, S. C."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Fort built around the officer's quarters of the First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel Sully, near Fair Oaks, VA. The peculiarities of the States and nationalities as were represented in the Federal Army developed themselves in a variety of ways. At Fortress Monroe the German regiments erected bowers in which they quaffed their lager and smoked, while their regimental bands played airs which led them back by the ear to Das Vaterland; and the Garibaldi Guard made their tents as much like Swiss cottages as possible. The First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel A. Sully, little dreaming how soon they would have to abandon their handiwork to the enemy, erected a fort around the commodious farm house near Fair Oaks, which, after the battle of Seven Pines, May 31st, 1862, had been given to their captains and lieutenants for their quarters. The appearance was so strange that an officer of General McClellan's staff made a sketch and sent it to us." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

First Minnesota Regiment

"Fort built around the officer's quarters of the First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel Sully, near Fair…

Ford's Theatre in Washington, where President Lincoln was assassinated.

Ford's Theatre

Ford's Theatre in Washington, where President Lincoln was assassinated.

Ford's Theatre, where President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

Ford's Theatre

Ford's Theatre, where President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

Fort Donelson and Fort Heiman, two sites of the American Civil War Forts Henry and Donelson Campaign, in which Union General Ulysses S. Grant and Admiral Andrew Hull Foote captured three forts, opened two rivers, and received national recognition for victories in February 1862, the first major Union victories of the war.

Fort Donelson

Fort Donelson and Fort Heiman, two sites of the American Civil War Forts Henry and Donelson Campaign,…

Fort Harrison was an important component of the Confederate defenses of Richmond during the American Civil War.

Fort Harrison, on the Wabash

Fort Harrison was an important component of the Confederate defenses of Richmond during the American…

"General view of Forts Hatters and Clark, N. C., captured on the 29th of August, 1861, by the Federal naval and military forces, under command of Commodore Stringham and Major General Butler. Articles of stipulation were signed on the flagship by Commodore Stringham and General Butler on the part of the United States, and by Commodore Barron, Colonel Martin and Major Andrews on the Confederate side, and the swords of the latter delivered up. The two forts remained in possession of the Federal troops, Fort Hatteras under command of Colonel Weber, and Fort Clark under that of Colonel Hawkins. The enemy's loss in killed was 15, and wounded 42; on the Federal side not a single man was either killed or wounded." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Hatteras

"General view of Forts Hatters and Clark, N. C., captured on the 29th of August, 1861, by the Federal…

Fort Jefferson was built in 1826 in Garden Key, Florida and used in the American Civil War.

Fort Jefferson, Garden Key

Fort Jefferson was built in 1826 in Garden Key, Florida and used in the American Civil War.

Fort Lafayette was an island coastal fortification in New York Harbor, built next to Fort Hamilton. During the Civil War, the casement were used to house Confederate prisoners of war and politicians opposed to Abraham Lincoln's administration policies.

Fort Lafayette

Fort Lafayette was an island coastal fortification in New York Harbor, built next to Fort Hamilton.…