The Ancient Greece ClipArt gallery offers 335 illustration of Greek history, events, and scenes of everyday life. For related images, please see Greek Mythology, Greek Architecture, Greek Ornament, Greek Coins, and the Ancient Greek Musical Instruments ClipArt galleries.

"Herakles, from the eastern pediment of the temple of Athena."-Whitney, 1902

Æginetan Sculpture

"Herakles, from the eastern pediment of the temple of Athena."-Whitney, 1902

"Ægis- Varvakeion Statuette of Athena."-Whitney, 1902

Ægis

"Ægis- Varvakeion Statuette of Athena."-Whitney, 1902

"A woolen cloak which was probably only a varied form of pallium." — Anthon, 1891

Abolla

"A woolen cloak which was probably only a varied form of pallium." — Anthon, 1891

"The act of lying or reclining; specifically, the ancient practice, derived from the Orient, of eating meals in a recumbent position." -Whitney, 1902

Accubation

"The act of lying or reclining; specifically, the ancient practice, derived from the Orient, of eating…

The Acropolis at Athens.

Acropolis

The Acropolis at Athens.

"The citadel of a Grecian city, usually the site of the original settlement, and situated on an eminence commanding the surrounding country."-Whitney, 1902

Acropolis

"The citadel of a Grecian city, usually the site of the original settlement, and situated on an eminence…

"Acropolis, 'the highest point of the city.' Many of the important cities of Greece and Asia Minor were protected by strongholds, so named. The A. occupied a lofty position, commanding the city and its environs; inaccessible on all sides except one, which had, for the most part, artificial defences. It contained some of the most important public buildings, especially temples, besides affording a last refuge in case of a hostile attack." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Acropolis

"Acropolis, 'the highest point of the city.' Many of the important cities of Greece and Asia Minor were…

"The Acropolis of Athens Restored." — Smith, 1882

Acropolis restored

"The Acropolis of Athens Restored." — Smith, 1882

An image of the Acropolis, as it was, seated in Athens, Greece. The Acropolis is an ancient, famed citadel that rests on a rocky outcrop above the city of Athens, and is a part of the World Heritage List.

The Acropolis

An image of the Acropolis, as it was, seated in Athens, Greece. The Acropolis is an ancient, famed citadel…

The sculpture of an ancient Snake Goddess. The artifact demonstrates typical Minoan female attire.

Aegean Snake Goddess

The sculpture of an ancient Snake Goddess. The artifact demonstrates typical Minoan female attire.

"The western pediment of the Temple of Aegina." —D'Anvers, 1895

Temple of Aegina

"The western pediment of the Temple of Aegina." —D'Anvers, 1895

Man waring Ocreae, or greaves. (From the Aeginetan Marbles)

Aeginetan Marbles

Man waring Ocreae, or greaves. (From the Aeginetan Marbles)

"The following cut, taken from one of Sir W. Hamilton's fictile vases, and representing Aeneas followed by Ascanius, and carrying off his father Anchises, who holds the sceptre in his right hand, shows its form as worn by kinds." — Anthon, 1891

Aeneas and Ascanius

"The following cut, taken from one of Sir W. Hamilton's fictile vases, and representing Aeneas followed…

"Aeschines owes the perpetuity of his fame to the fact he was the only rival of Demosthenes. He was five years older than the great orator, being born in 389 B.C. In early life he served as a soldier, then as a public clerk, and afterwards undertook the role of an actor." — The Delphian Society, 1913

Aeschines

"Aeschines owes the perpetuity of his fame to the fact he was the only rival of Demosthenes. He was…

"The first noted public appearance of [Alcibiades] was on the occasion of the coming of the Lacedaemonian ambassadors requesting the surrender of Pylus. He at first violently opposed the petition, and even went so far as to urge the sending of an embassy to Argos to solicit that city to become a member in a new Athenian league. In spite of the earnest efforts of Nicias and of the protests of the Spartan ambassador, Alcibiades, by means of intrigue and bluster, succeeded in this work, and not only Argos, but also Elis and Mantinea, agreed to maintain an alliance with Athens for a hundred years."—Ridpath, 1885

Alcibiades

"The first noted public appearance of [Alcibiades] was on the occasion of the coming of the Lacedaemonian…

"Sarcophagus of Alexander (So-called)" — Morey, 1903

Alexander

"Sarcophagus of Alexander (So-called)" — Morey, 1903

"Alexander" — Morey, 1903

Alexander

"Alexander" — Morey, 1903

"Greeks of the Alexandrian Period." — Quackenbos, 1882

Alexandrian

"Greeks of the Alexandrian Period." — Quackenbos, 1882

Filling an amphora.

Amphora

Filling an amphora.

"Amphyces, Frontlets. A frontal, a broad band or plate of metal, which ladies of rank wore above the forehead as part of the head-dress. The frontal of a horse was called by the same name. The annexed cut exhibits the frontal on the head of Pegasus, in conrast with the corresponding ornament as shown on the heads of two females." — Smith, 1873

Amphyx

"Amphyces, Frontlets. A frontal, a broad band or plate of metal, which ladies of rank wore above the…

"Examples of Greek Head-dresses (Ampyxes)."-Whitney, 1902

Ampyx

"Examples of Greek Head-dresses (Ampyxes)."-Whitney, 1902

"Though Anacreon has been famous as the poet of wine and love, few geniune fragments of his songs have come down to us. Those which pass under his name belong to his Greek imitators in later times. Specimens are given here in relief after the prosing of historians and philosophers." — The Delphian Society, 1913

Anacreon

"Though Anacreon has been famous as the poet of wine and love, few geniune fragments of his songs have…

Greek <em>aplustria</em>, or stern ornament.

Aplustria

Greek aplustria, or stern ornament.

An ancient sculpture representing an athlete using a strigil to scrape sweat and dust off his body.

Apoxyomenos

An ancient sculpture representing an athlete using a strigil to scrape sweat and dust off his body.

"An alter. Ara was a general term denoting any structure elevated aove the ground, and used to receive upon it offerings made to the gods. Altare, probably contracted from alta ara, was properly restricted to the larger, higher, and more expensive structures. The two specimens shown here are square." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Ara

"An alter. Ara was a general term denoting any structure elevated aove the ground, and used to receive…

"An alter. Ara was a general term denoting any structure elevated aove the ground, and used to receive upon it offerings made to the gods. Altare, probably contracted from alta ara, was properly restricted to the larger, higher, and more expensive structures." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Ara

"An alter. Ara was a general term denoting any structure elevated aove the ground, and used to receive…

This medal shows that the people of Aradus venerated the sun, and were proud of the products of their territory, corn and wine.

Aradus

This medal shows that the people of Aradus venerated the sun, and were proud of the products of their…

"The bow used for shooting arrows, is one of the most ancient of all weapons, but is characteristic of Asia rather than of Europe. In the Roman armies it was scarcely ever employed except by auxiliaries; and these auxiliaries, called sagittarii, were chiefly Cretans and Arabians. This image shows the Scythian or Parthian bow unstrung." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Arcus

"The bow used for shooting arrows, is one of the most ancient of all weapons, but is characteristic…

"The bow used for shooting arrows, is one of the most ancient of all weapons, but is characteristic of Asia rather than of Europe. In the Roman armies it was scarcely ever employed except by auxiliaries; and these auxiliaries, called sagittarii, were chiefly Cretans and Arabians. This image shows the usual form of the Grecian bow, which had a double curvature, consisting of two circular portions united by the handle. When not used the bow was put into a case which was made of leather, and sometimes ornamented." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Arcus

"The bow used for shooting arrows, is one of the most ancient of all weapons, but is characteristic…

"The bow used for shooting arrows, is one of the most ancient of all weapons, but is characteristic of Asia rather than of Europe. In the Roman armies it was scarcely ever employed except by auxiliaries; and these auxiliaries, called sagittarii, were chiefly Cretans and Arabians. When not used the bow was put into a case which was made of leather, and sometimes ornamented. This image shows a drawing the bow." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Arcus

"The bow used for shooting arrows, is one of the most ancient of all weapons, but is characteristic…

"Navigation for the purpose of commerce, and the art of writing, are said to have originated with the Phoenicians. On their arrival in Greece, Inachus and his friends founded the city of Argos, at the head of what is now called the Gulf of Napoli, in the Peloponnesus." &mdash; Goodrich, 1844

Founding of Argos

"Navigation for the purpose of commerce, and the art of writing, are said to have originated with the…

"The battering-ram, was used to batter down the walls of besieged cities. It consisted of a large beam, made of the trunk of a tree, especially of a fir or an ash. To one end was fastened a mass of bronze or iron, which resembled in its form the head of a ram. The upper figure in the annexed cut shows the aries in its simplest state, and as it was borne and impelled by human hands, without other assistance. In an improced form, the ram was surrounded with iron bands, to which rings were attached for the purpose of suspending it by ropes or chains from a beam fixed transversel over it. " &mdash; Smith, 1873

Aries

"The battering-ram, was used to batter down the walls of besieged cities. It consisted of a large beam,…

A stature of Aristophanes, who was a prolific and commonly celebrated playwright of comedy. He is also known as the Father of Comedy.

Aristophanes

A stature of Aristophanes, who was a prolific and commonly celebrated playwright of comedy. He is also…

The Greek judge's chair was made of marble and was found on the site of the Prytaneum, Athens.

Greek Judge's Arm-Chair

The Greek judge's chair was made of marble and was found on the site of the Prytaneum, Athens.

"Homer describes in various passages an entire suit of armour, and we observe that it consisted of the same portions which were used by the Greek soldiers ever after. Moreover, the order of putting them on is always the same. The heavy-armed warrior, having already a tunic around his body, and preparing for combat, puts on-1. his greaves; 2. his cuirass; 3. his sword, hung on the left side of his body by means of a belt which passed over the right shoulder; 4. the large round shield, supported in the same manner; 5. his helmet; 6. he took his spear." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Arma

"Homer describes in various passages an entire suit of armour, and we observe that it consisted of the…

"An adze. Muratori has published numerous representations of the adze, as it is exhibited on ancient monuments. We select the three following, two of which show the instrument itself, with a slight variety of form, while the third represents a ship-builder holding it in his right hand, and using it to shape the rib of a vessel." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Ascia

"An adze. Muratori has published numerous representations of the adze, as it is exhibited on ancient…

The temple of Asklepios.

Temple of Asklepios

The temple of Asklepios.

"Athena (Minerva) superintending the building of the Argo." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Athena and Argo

"Athena (Minerva) superintending the building of the Argo." — Smith, 1882

"A decree of the Council and Assembly dating from about 450 B.C."&mdash;Webster, 1913

An Athenian Inscription

"A decree of the Council and Assembly dating from about 450 B.C."—Webster, 1913

"Monument commemorating the triumph of an Athenian citizen in music," Lysicrates. -Breasted, 1914

Athenian Monument

"Monument commemorating the triumph of an Athenian citizen in music," Lysicrates. -Breasted, 1914

"Street of tombs outside Ancient Athens." -Breasted, 1914

Athenian Tombs

"Street of tombs outside Ancient Athens." -Breasted, 1914

An illustration of a group of Athenian youth on horses.

Athenian Youth on Horses

An illustration of a group of Athenian youth on horses.

"Athens, in the time of Pericles."&mdash;Colby, 1899

Athens

"Athens, in the time of Pericles."—Colby, 1899

"The Temple of Theseus, the Areopagus, and the Acropolis of Athens." -Breasted, 1914

Athens

"The Temple of Theseus, the Areopagus, and the Acropolis of Athens." -Breasted, 1914

"The Piraeus or Harbor of Athens."&mdash;Colby, 1899

Athens Harbor

"The Piraeus or Harbor of Athens."—Colby, 1899

"The Piraeus, the Port of Athens (Restoration)" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Athens Port

"The Piraeus, the Port of Athens (Restoration)" — Morey, 1903

"Athens restored, from the Pnyx." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Athens restored

"Athens restored, from the Pnyx." — Smith, 1882

"The mosted noted of the orations of Isocrates is the Panathenaicus or Panegyric of Athens, a work on which he spent ten years, and in which he uses all the resources of his art to extol Athens and magnify the benefits she conferred o nthe whole of Greece." &mdash; The Delphian Society, 1913

Ancient athens

"The mosted noted of the orations of Isocrates is the Panathenaicus or Panegyric of Athens, a work on…

View of Athens.

Ancient Athens

View of Athens.

"A term applicable to any black colouring substance, for whatever purpose it may be used, like the melan of the Greeks. There were, however, thress principal kinds of atramentum: one called librarium or scriptorium, writing-ink; another called sutorium, which was used by the showmakers for dyeing leather; the third tectorium or pictorium, which was used by painters for some purposes, apparently as a sort of varnish. The inks of the ancients seem to have been more durable than our own; they were thicker and more unctuous, in substance and durability more resembling the ink now used by printers. An inkstand was discovered at Herculaneum, containing ink as thick as oil, and still usable rfor writing. The following cur represents inkstands found at Pompeii." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Atramentum

"A term applicable to any black colouring substance, for whatever purpose it may be used, like the melan…

The Treasury of Atreus or Tomb of Agamemnon is an impressive "tholos" tomb at Mycenae, Greece (on the Panagitsa Hill) constructed around 1250 BCE. The lintel stone above the doorway weighs 120 tons. The tomb was used for an unknown period of time.

Treasury of Atreus Doorway

The Treasury of Atreus or Tomb of Agamemnon is an impressive "tholos" tomb at Mycenae, Greece (on the…

The Tomb of Atreus also known as the Treasury of Atreus is a tomb located in Mycenae, Greece built between 1250 and 1300 B.C. The face of the tomb consists of columns and has a triangle above the doorway. The tomb has an interior that is formed of a semi-underground circular room with a beehive tomb, also known as the tholos.

Tomb of Atreus

The Tomb of Atreus also known as the Treasury of Atreus is a tomb located in Mycenae, Greece built between…

"Auletris.- Performer on the double flute or diaulos. (From a Greek red-figured vase; 5th century B.C.)"-Whitney, 1902.

Auletris

"Auletris.- Performer on the double flute or diaulos. (From a Greek red-figured vase; 5th century B.C.)"-Whitney,…

An illustration of a bacchic procession.

Bacchic Procession

An illustration of a bacchic procession.

The Greek bedstead had a vase painting and served partly as bed, and partly as couch.

Greek Bedstead

The Greek bedstead had a vase painting and served partly as bed, and partly as couch.

"Represents two forms of the bow; the upper, the Scythian or Parthian bow enstrung, agreeing with the form of that now used by the Tartars, the lower, the ordinary bow, like the one mentioned in the text." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Ancient bows

"Represents two forms of the bow; the upper, the Scythian or Parthian bow enstrung, agreeing with the…

"The Olympic games were of greater efficacy than the Amphictyonic Council in promoting the spirit of union among the various branches of the Greek race, and in keeping alive a feeling of their common origin. They were open to all persons who could prove their Hellenic blood, and were frequented by spectators from all parts of the Grecian world. They were celebrated at Olympia, on the banks of the alpheus, in the territory of Elis." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Boxing

"The Olympic games were of greater efficacy than the Amphictyonic Council in promoting the spirit of…

"Trowsers, pantaloons, were common to all the nations which encircled the Greek and Roman population, extending from the Indian to the Atlantic ocean, but were not worn by the Greeks and Romans themselves. Accordingly the monuments containing representations of people different from the Greeks and romans exhibit them in trowsers, thus distinguishing them from the latter people. An example is seen in the preceding group of Sarmatians." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Bracae

"Trowsers, pantaloons, were common to all the nations which encircled the Greek and Roman population,…

A Greek bracelet

Bracelet

A Greek bracelet

"The loaves of the ancients were generally circular, and more or less flat. The following cut represents some found in a bakehouse at Pompeii." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Circular bread

"The loaves of the ancients were generally circular, and more or less flat. The following cut represents…