This ClipArt gallery includes 178 illustrations related to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

"The funeral cortege, at boston, Mass., of the Sixth Massachusetts soldiers killed at Baltimore. The funeral of the four soldiers of the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment who were killed in Baltimore, April 19th, 1861, while en route to Washington, was held at Boston, May 1st. The bodies were received in the city by a military escort under Governor Andrew and Adjutant General Schouler, accompanied by a large concourse of citizens, and were temporarily deposited in the vaults of King's Chapel. The names of these 'first martyrs' were Luther C. Ladd, Addison O. Whitney, Charles A. Taylor and Sumner H. Needham. The Legislature of Maryland, on March 5th, 1862, appropriated seven thousand dollars, to be dispensed, under the direction of the Governor of Massachusetts, for the relief of the families of those who were killed and injured."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Funeral Cortege

"The funeral cortege, at boston, Mass., of the Sixth Massachusetts soldiers killed at Baltimore. The…

Political cartoon of unfairly redrawn congressional districts, origin of the term "gerrymander".

The "Gerrymander"

Political cartoon of unfairly redrawn congressional districts, origin of the term "gerrymander".

The Great Bridge over the Charles River connected Cambridge, Massachusetts to Little Cambridge, which was the name for Allston-Brighton before it separated from Cambridge in 1807, first becoming the town of Brighton and finally joining the city of Boston in 1874. The Great Bridge was built in 1660-1662 at what was then called Brighton Street, and was the first bridge to span the Charles. A toll was authorized in 1670, rebuilt in 1862.

Great Bridge at McConkey's Ferry

The Great Bridge over the Charles River connected Cambridge, Massachusetts to Little Cambridge, which…

The Faneuil hall was built in 1742 by a Boston merchant named Peter Faneuil. The first floor was used as a market house and the second floor as a town hall.

Faneuil Hall

The Faneuil hall was built in 1742 by a Boston merchant named Peter Faneuil. The first floor was used…

A spacious public hall in boston, Massachusetts, erected in 1742 by Peter Faneuil and presented by him to the town. In 1761, it was destroyed by fire, and rebuilt.

Faneuil Hall

A spacious public hall in boston, Massachusetts, erected in 1742 by Peter Faneuil and presented by him…

The house of John Hancock in Boston, Massachusetts.

Hancock's House, Boston

The house of John Hancock in Boston, Massachusetts.

John Hancock (January 23 1737 [O.S. January 12, 1736] - October 8, 1793) was a Massachusetts merchant and prominent patriot of the American Revolution, but is most famous for his prominent signature on the United States Declaration of Independence.

John Hancock

John Hancock (January 23 1737 [O.S. January 12, 1736] - October 8, 1793) was a Massachusetts merchant…

Harvard College in 1720.

Harvard

Harvard College in 1720.

Harvard University

Harvard

Harvard University

A drawing of Harvard College in 1720.

Harvard College in 1720

A drawing of Harvard College in 1720.

Harvard College in the 18th century.

Harvard College in the Eighteenth Century

Harvard College in the 18th century.

The seal of Harvard University in Massachusetts.

Seal of Harvard

The seal of Harvard University in Massachusetts.

The birthplace of famous writer, Nathaniel Hawthorne in Salem, Massachusetts.

Birthplace of Nathaniel Hawthorne

The birthplace of famous writer, Nathaniel Hawthorne in Salem, Massachusetts.

(1826-1904) US representative and senator from Massachusetts that helped draft the Sherman Antitrust Act.

George F. Hoar

(1826-1904) US representative and senator from Massachusetts that helped draft the Sherman Antitrust…

US Senator from Massachusetts who served during the Spanish American War.

George F. Hoar

US Senator from Massachusetts who served during the Spanish American War.

George Frisbie Hoar (August 29, 1826 - September 30, 1904) was a prominent United States politician and United States Senator from Massachusetts.

George Frisbie Hoar

George Frisbie Hoar (August 29, 1826 - September 30, 1904) was a prominent United States politician…

(1711-1780) Governor of Massachusetts

Governor Thomas Hutchinson

(1711-1780) Governor of Massachusetts

Thomas Hutchinson (September 9, 1711 - June 3, 1780) was the royal governor of Massachusetts from 1771 to 1774 and a prominent Loyalist in the years before the American Revolutionary War.

Thomas Hutchinson

Thomas Hutchinson (September 9, 1711 - June 3, 1780) was the royal governor of Massachusetts from 1771…

A view of the Battle of Lexington during the American Revolutionary War.

Battle of Lexington

A view of the Battle of Lexington during the American Revolutionary War.

"Monument at Lexington. This view is from the Concord Road, looking eastward, and shows a portion of the inclosure of the Green. The distant building seen on the right is the old 'Buckman Tavern,' delineated in Doolittle's engraving. It now belongs to Mrs. Merriam, and exhibits many scars made by the bullets on the morning of the skirmish."—Lossing, 1851

Lexington Monument

"Monument at Lexington. This view is from the Concord Road, looking eastward, and shows a portion of…

"Monument at Lexington, up close view."—Lossing, 1851

Lexington Monument

"Monument at Lexington, up close view."—Lossing, 1851

"Skirmish at Lexington. The largest building in the picture is the meeting-house, and the officer on horseback in front of it is Major Pitcairn. The figures in the foreground are the provincial militia. The dwelling with the two chimneys on the left (which is still standing), was Buckman's Tavern. The position of the monument since erected upon Lexington Green, is about where the provincials on the left are seen dispersing. The merit of this picture consists in its truthfulness in depicting the appearance of the spot at the time of the engagement."—Lossing, 1851

Skirmish at Lexington

"Skirmish at Lexington. The largest building in the picture is the meeting-house, and the officer on…

A battle between English and colonial forces.

The Fight at Lexington

A battle between English and colonial forces.

"Liberty Tree. I am indebted to the Hon. David Sears, of Boston, for this sketch of the 'Liberty Tree,' as it appeared just previous to its destruction by the British troops and Tories, during the siege of Boston in August, 1775. Mr. Sears has erected a row of fine buildings upon the site of the old grove of elms, of which this tree was one; and within a niche, on the front of one of them, and exactly over the spot where the <em>Liberty Tree</em> stood, he has placed a sculptured representation of it, as seen in the picture. From the time of the Stamp Act excitement until the armed possession of Boston by General Gage and his troops in 1774, that tree had been the rallying-place for the patriots, and had fallen, in consequence, much in disfavor with the friends of government. It was inscribed 'Liberty Tree,' and the ground under it was called 'Liberty Hall.' The Essex Gazette of August 31st, 1775, in describing the destruction of the tree, says, 'They made a furious attack upon it. After a long spell of laughing and grinning, sweating, swearing, and foaming with malice diabolical, they cut down the tree because it bore the name of liberty. A soldier was killed by falling from one of its branches during the operation.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Liberty Tree

"Liberty Tree. I am indebted to the Hon. David Sears, of Boston, for this sketch of the 'Liberty Tree,'…

Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician, and a noted historian. Senator from Massachusetts.

Henry Cabot Lodge

Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician,…

John Davis Long (October 27, 1838 – August 28, 1915) was a U.S. political figure. He served as Governor of Massachusetts between 1880 and 1883. He later served as the Secretary of the Navy from 1897 to 1902.

John Davis Long

John Davis Long (October 27, 1838 – August 28, 1915) was a U.S. political figure. He served as Governor…

The founder of the Wheaton Female Seminary in Massachusetts. Two years later, she established Mount Holyoke Female Seminary.

Mary Lyon

The founder of the Wheaton Female Seminary in Massachusetts. Two years later, she established Mount…

An American education reformer and abolitionist. He was born in Franklin, Massachusetts. He was brother-in-law to author Nathaniel Hawthorne since their wives were sisters.

Horace Mann

An American education reformer and abolitionist. He was born in Franklin, Massachusetts. He was brother-in-law…

The official seal of the U.S. state of Massachusetts in 1889.

Massachusetts

The official seal of the U.S. state of Massachusetts in 1889.

The United States seal of Massachusetts in 1788.

Massachusetts

The United States seal of Massachusetts in 1788.

The state banner of Massachusetts, the bay state.

Massachusetts

The state banner of Massachusetts, the bay state.

"Pine Tree Flag of Massachusetts."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Massachusetts flag

"Pine Tree Flag of Massachusetts."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Seal of Massachusetts Bay Company

Massachusetts Seal

Seal of Massachusetts Bay Company

Seal of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1876

Massachusetts seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1876

Seal of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1890

Massachusetts seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1890

Seal of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1876

Massachusetts seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1876

The Seal of the State of Massachusetts. The seal has a shield in the center with a Algonquin Native American holding a bow and arrow. Around the shield, is a blue ribbon with the state motto, 'Ense Petit Placidam Sub Libertate Quietem" which means "By the sword we seek peace, but only under liberty."

Seal of Massachusetts

The Seal of the State of Massachusetts. The seal has a shield in the center with a Algonquin Native…

In 1690, The Massachusetts Bay Colony issued the first paper money in the colonies, called Colonial Notes, which would later form the United States.

Reverse of a Massachusetts Treasury Note

In 1690, The Massachusetts Bay Colony issued the first paper money in the colonies, called Colonial…

Seal of the colony of Massachusetts.

Massachusetts seal

Seal of the colony of Massachusetts.

Seal of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1875

Massachusetts seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1875

Seal of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1913

Massachusetts seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1913

"Mathers' Vault."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Mathers' Vault

"Mathers' Vault."—Lossing, 1851

The ship that the Pilgrims came to America on.

Mayflower

The ship that the Pilgrims came to America on.

The Mayflower is the ship that the Pilgrims sailed on from England to Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Mayflower

The Mayflower is the ship that the Pilgrims sailed on from England to Plymouth, Massachusetts.

The ship that transported the Pilgrims from Plymouth, England to Plymouth, Massachusetts, which would later become the Plymouth Colony.

The Mayflower

The ship that transported the Pilgrims from Plymouth, England to Plymouth, Massachusetts, which would…

An illustration depicting the signing of the Compact aboard the Mayflower.

Signing of the Mayflower Contract

An illustration depicting the signing of the Compact aboard the Mayflower.

One of the ships used to transport the English Separatists to Plymouth, Massachusetts.

The Mayflower

One of the ships used to transport the English Separatists to Plymouth, Massachusetts.

The ship that transported the English pilgrims from Plymouth, England to Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1620.

The Mayflower

The ship that transported the English pilgrims from Plymouth, England to Plymouth, Massachusetts in…

An American evangelist and publisher who founded the Moody Church, Northfield School and Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts, the Moody Bible Institute and Moody Press.

Dwight Moody

An American evangelist and publisher who founded the Moody Church, Northfield School and Mount Hermon…

Section of frontal moraine on side of Warner Street, Glouchester, Massachusetts.

Section of Frontal Moraine

Section of frontal moraine on side of Warner Street, Glouchester, Massachusetts.

"Birthplace of S. F. B. Morse, at Charlestown, Mass., built 1775."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Morse birthplace

"Birthplace of S. F. B. Morse, at Charlestown, Mass., built 1775."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

A statesman, born in Oxford, Mass., Sept. 15, 1835. In 1856 he completed a course at Brown University, studied three years at the Harvard Law School, and after being admitted to the bar, developed a successful practice in Boston. In 1874 he entered the Massachusetts legislature, but soon after retired from public life to attend his extensive law practice, President Cleveland appointed him attorney-general in 1893, and in 1895 he became secretary of state as successor to Gresham, the duties of which office he administered with much ability.

Richard Olney

A statesman, born in Oxford, Mass., Sept. 15, 1835. In 1856 he completed a course at Brown University,…

(1725-1783) political leader in Massachusetts

James Otis

(1725-1783) political leader in Massachusetts

(1725-1783) A lawyer in colonial Massachusetts who was an early advocate of the views that led to the American Revolution.

James Otis

(1725-1783) A lawyer in colonial Massachusetts who was an early advocate of the views that led to the…

Signer of the Declaration of Independence representing Massachusetts

Robert Treat Paine

Signer of the Declaration of Independence representing Massachusetts

In 1690, The Massachusetts Bay Colony issued the first paper money in the colonies, called Colonial Notes, which would later form the United States.

First American Paper Money, 1690

In 1690, The Massachusetts Bay Colony issued the first paper money in the colonies, called Colonial…

Thirty-Six Shillings (36 shillings) Massachusetts currency from 1775. Image in lower left of an anchored left-facing sailing ship.

Paper Money, Thirty-Six Shillings Bill, 1775

Thirty-Six Shillings (36 shillings) Massachusetts currency from 1775. Image in lower left of an anchored…

Three Dollar ($3) Massachusetts currency from 1780. No image on obverse. Reverse shows the inscription - GUARANTEED BY THE UNITED STATES.

Paper Money, Three Dollar Bill, 1780

Three Dollar ($3) Massachusetts currency from 1780. No image on obverse. Reverse shows the inscription…

"The first passenger locomotive built in the United States. A year after the Enterprise sailed for India, the first railroad in the United States was opened in Massachusetts, from the Quincy quarries to tide water. It was only two miles long, and was used for hauling granite; the cars were drawn by horses. It was the first use of rails in America. In 1830 the first passenger railway in America was opened. It extended westward from Baltimore about fifteen miles, and now forms a part of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The cars were at first drawn by horses, but a locomotive was used the next year. Its first locomotive was built by Peter Cooper, who made later the generous and useful gift of the Cooper Union to the city of New York. Now began the construction of railroads in various directions; in the next twenty years nearly ten thousand miles of road were built. This mileage has constantly been increased, until in 1895 there were in operation in the United States nearly one hundred and eighty thousand miles of railway."—Scudder, 1897

Passenger Train

"The first passenger locomotive built in the United States. A year after the Enterprise sailed for India,…

(1795-1869) An entrepreneur and philanthropist who founded the Peabody Institute in Boston. He was born in Danvers, Massachusetts to a middle class family.

George Peabody

(1795-1869) An entrepreneur and philanthropist who founded the Peabody Institute in Boston. He was born…