This ClipArt gallery includes 178 illustrations related to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Peacefield or Old House was the estate of both presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams in Quincy, Massachusetts.

Peacefield, Adam's Estate

Peacefield or Old House was the estate of both presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams in Quincy,…

British settler and soldier in colonial Massachusetts.

Sir William Pepperrell

British settler and soldier in colonial Massachusetts.

Pilgrims returning from church

Pilgrims

Pilgrims returning from church

The Pilgrims in Holland.

Pilgrims

The Pilgrims in Holland.

Site of First Church and Governor Bradford's House at Plymouth.

Plymouth

Site of First Church and Governor Bradford's House at Plymouth.

Plymouth Harbor, England

Plymouth Harbor

Plymouth Harbor, England

"Plymouth is a town and county-seat of Plymouth co., Mass.; on Plymouth Bay, 37 miles S. E. of Boston. Plymouth is of importance as the spot where the Pilgrim Fathers landed on Dec. 21, 1620. A portion of the rock on which they first stepped has been placed in front of Pilgrim Hall, in which are preserved old books, paintings, pictures, and other valuable relics. The rock itself is in Water Street, and is covered by a handsome granite canopy."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Plymouth Rock

"Plymouth is a town and county-seat of Plymouth co., Mass.; on Plymouth Bay, 37 miles S. E. of Boston.…

Plymouth Rock where Captain John Smith landed.

Plymouth Rock

Plymouth Rock where Captain John Smith landed.

The rock in Plymouth, MA where the pilgrims are said to have first stepped off from the Mayflower in 1620.

Plymouth Rock

The rock in Plymouth, MA where the pilgrims are said to have first stepped off from the Mayflower in…

An illustration of Plymouth Rock which is the traditional site of disembarkation of William Bradford and the Mayflower Pilgrims who founded Plymouth Colony in 1620, it what would later become the United States.

Plymouth Rock

An illustration of Plymouth Rock which is the traditional site of disembarkation of William Bradford…

Plymouth Rock is the traditional site of disembarkation of William Bradford and the Mayflower Pilgrims who founded Plymouth Colony in 1620, in what would become the United States.

Plymouth Rock and Monument

Plymouth Rock is the traditional site of disembarkation of William Bradford and the Mayflower Pilgrims…

Pocahontas interceding for Captain John Smith

Pocahontas Interceding for John Smith

Pocahontas interceding for Captain John Smith

"Pocahontas' wash-basin."—Lossing, 1851

Pocahontas' basin

"Pocahontas' wash-basin."—Lossing, 1851

A pot and platter belonging to Miles Standish. Miles Standish was a soldier hired by the Pilgrims to be their military advisor.

Pot and Platter

A pot and platter belonging to Miles Standish. Miles Standish was a soldier hired by the Pilgrims to…

The Province House, the residence of the royal governors of Massachusetts.

The Province House

The Province House, the residence of the royal governors of Massachusetts.

The Province House that the royal governor of Massachusetts, Thomas Hutchinson, lived in.

The Province House

The Province House that the royal governor of Massachusetts, Thomas Hutchinson, lived in.

"The Province House. The Province House, the residence of the colonial governors, is still standing, in the rear of stores on Washington Street, oppposite Milk Street. It is a large brick building, three stories high, and was formerly decorated with the king's arms richly carved and gilt. A cupola surmounted the roof. In front of the house was a pretty lawn with an iron fence, and on each side of the gate was a large oak-tree. The ground sloped, and in front were about twenty stone steps. Its grounds are now covered with buildings, and the house can not be seen without entering Province Court. The king's arms are in the cabinet of the Massachusetts Historical Society."—Lossing, 1851

Province House

"The Province House. The Province House, the residence of the colonial governors, is still standing,…

"Crane Public Library, Quincy, Mass." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Public Library

"Crane Public Library, Quincy, Mass." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Early New England Puritan church.

Puritan Church

Early New England Puritan church.

The Puritans of New England.

Puritans

The Puritans of New England.

Puritan settlers in New England.

Puritans

Puritan settlers in New England.

A man and woman in Puritan dress walking down a path.

Puritans

A man and woman in Puritan dress walking down a path.

The birthplace of Israel Putnam at Salem, Massachusetts.

Birthplace of Israel Putnam

The birthplace of Israel Putnam at Salem, Massachusetts.

The alert given by Paul Revere to his fellow patriots. The Regular army is the permanent army of a country that is maintained during peacetime.

The Regulars Are Coming

The alert given by Paul Revere to his fellow patriots. The Regular army is the permanent army of a country…

The famous ride of Paul Revere.

Revere's Ride

The famous ride of Paul Revere.

Paul Revere's famous ride through Charlestown, Medford, and Lexington, to alert the citizens that the British had arrived for battle.

The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere

Paul Revere's famous ride through Charlestown, Medford, and Lexington, to alert the citizens that the…

First Church in Salem, when in 1631, Church and State were made one, and the goverment a theocracy.

Salem Church

First Church in Salem, when in 1631, Church and State were made one, and the goverment a theocracy.

The first church at Salem, Massachusetts founded by the Puritan colonists.

Salem Church

The first church at Salem, Massachusetts founded by the Puritan colonists.

A street in Salem, Massachusetts.

A Street in Salem

A street in Salem, Massachusetts.

A drawing of early settlers in New England.

Early Settlers in New England

A drawing of early settlers in New England.

"A scene at Springfield, during Shay's Rebellion, when the mob attempted to prevent the holding of the Courts of Justice."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Shay's Rebellion

"A scene at Springfield, during Shay's Rebellion, when the mob attempted to prevent the holding of the…

(1694-1771) Governor of Massachusetts.

William Shirley

(1694-1771) Governor of Massachusetts.

Captain Myles Standish (sometimes spelled Miles) was an English born military officer hired by the Pilgrims as military advisor for Plymouth colony.

Standish and His Companions

Captain Myles Standish (sometimes spelled Miles) was an English born military officer hired by the Pilgrims…

Captain Myles Standish (sometimes spelled Miles) was an English born military officer hired by the Pilgrims as military advisor for Plymouth colony.

Standish's Sword and Musket Barrel

Captain Myles Standish (sometimes spelled Miles) was an English born military officer hired by the Pilgrims…

The Massachusetts State House, also called Massachusetts Statehouse or the New State House, is the state capitol and seat of government of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It is located in Boston.

The State House, Boston, Massachusetts

The Massachusetts State House, also called Massachusetts Statehouse or the New State House, is the state…

Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts and involved in the Salem Witchcraft trials. He became acting governor when Governor Phips was recalled to London to answer charges of misconduct.

William Stoughton

Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts and involved in the Salem Witchcraft trials. He became acting governor…

Charles Sumner (January 6, 1811 – March 11, 1874) was an American politician and statesman from Massachusetts.

Charles Sumner

Charles Sumner (January 6, 1811 – March 11, 1874) was an American politician and statesman from Massachusetts.

Throwing the tea overboard.

Tea

Throwing the tea overboard.

Boston Tea Party

Tea Party

Boston Tea Party

"Massachusetts Bill of Three Shillings in 1741."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Three Shillings

"Massachusetts Bill of Three Shillings in 1741."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

"Reverse of a Massachusetts Treasury note. This is a fac simile of the device on the back of one of the first of the Massachusetts treasury notes or bills of credit. The literal translation of the Latin inscription is 'He seeks by the sword calm repose under the auspices of Freedom.' In othe words, to use a phrase of the present time, they were determined 'to conquer a peace.' The face of the bill has a neatly-engraved border of scroll-work; and on the left of the brace where the names of the committee are signed, is a circle with a ship within it."—Lossing, 1851

Treasury Note

"Reverse of a Massachusetts Treasury note. This is a fac simile of the device on the back of one of…

When the Puritans settled Boston, it was first called Trimountain, because of the three hills.

Trimountain

When the Puritans settled Boston, it was first called Trimountain, because of the three hills.

Trinity Church, a Protestant Episcopal church in Boston, Massachusetts.

Trinity

Trinity Church, a Protestant Episcopal church in Boston, Massachusetts.

(1612-1662) English statesman and writer. American governor of Massachusetts 1636-1637.

Sir Henry (Harry) Vane

(1612-1662) English statesman and writer. American governor of Massachusetts 1636-1637.

"Warren's monument."—Lossing, 1851

Warren's Monument

"Warren's monument."—Lossing, 1851

Warren's Monument was created in memory of Mason and fallen Bunker Hill hero Dr. Joseph Warren in 1794 by King Solomon's Lodge of Masons and was initially an 18 foot (5.5 m) wooden pillar topped with a gilt urn.

Warren's Monument

Warren's Monument was created in memory of Mason and fallen Bunker Hill hero Dr. Joseph Warren in 1794…

"Joseph Warren, of Boston, the idol of Massachusetts, was shot while leaving the redoubt of the Battle of Bunker Hill."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Joseph Warren

"Joseph Warren, of Boston, the idol of Massachusetts, was shot while leaving the redoubt of the Battle…

"The Washington Elm. The horse seen in this sketch is one of the oldest in Cambridge, having been built about 1750. It has been in the posession of the Moore family about seventy-five years. Since I visited Cambridge I have been informed that a Mrs. Moore was still living there, who, from the window of that house, saw the ceremony of Washington taking command of the army."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Elm

"The Washington Elm. The horse seen in this sketch is one of the oldest in Cambridge, having been built…

This illustration shows George Washington taking command of his troups during the American Revolution.

Washington Taking Command

This illustration shows George Washington taking command of his troups during the American Revolution.

Although he did not explicitly seek the office of commander and even claimed that he was not equal to it, there was no serious competition. Congress created the Continental Army on June 14, 1775; the next day, on the nomination of John Adams of Massachusetts, Washington was appointed Major General and elected by Congress to be Commander-in-chief.

Washington Taking Command of the Army

Although he did not explicitly seek the office of commander and even claimed that he was not equal to…

Washington used the home as his headquarters and home while he planned the Siege of Boston between July 1775 and April 1776. During his time there, Washington was visited by John Adams and Abigail Adams, Benedict Arnold, Henry Knox, and Nathaniel Greene. Martha Washington joined her husband in December 1775 and the two stayed in the house until March 1776. On Twelfth Night in January 1776, the couple celebrated their wedding anniversary in the home.

Washington's Headquarters at Cambridge, 1775

Washington used the home as his headquarters and home while he planned the Siege of Boston between July…

A private four-year women's college in Wellesley, Massachusetts.

Wellesley College

A private four-year women's college in Wellesley, Massachusetts.

Roger William's house at Salem

William's House

Roger William's house at Salem

Henry Wilson (February 16, 1812 – November 22, 1875) was a Senator from Massachusetts and the eighteenth Vice President of the United States. He was a leading Republican who devoted his enormous energies to the destruction of what he considered the slavocracy, that is the conspiracy of slave owners to seize control of the federal government and block the progress of liberty.

Henry Wilson

Henry Wilson (February 16, 1812 – November 22, 1875) was a Senator from Massachusetts and the eighteenth…

The governor of the Massachusetts colony, born in Groton, England, Jan. 12, 1588; died in Boston, Mass., March 26, 1649.

John Winthrop

The governor of the Massachusetts colony, born in Groton, England, Jan. 12, 1588; died in Boston, Mass.,…

John Winthrop (12 January 1588 – 26 March 1649) led a group of English Puritans to the New World, joined the Massachusetts Bay Company in 1629 and was elected their governor in October 1629. Between 1639 and 1648 he was voted out of governorship and re-elected a total of 12 times. Although Winthrop was a respected political figure, he was criticized for his obstinacy regarding the formation of a general assembly in 1634.

John Winthrop

John Winthrop (12 January 1588 – 26 March 1649) led a group of English Puritans to the New World,…

A phrase that refers to the first shot fired against the British in the American Revolution, during the Battle of Lexington and Concord.

The Shot that is Heard Around the World

A phrase that refers to the first shot fired against the British in the American Revolution, during…