A budding apple, with the egg of a coddling moth.

Infested apple bud

A budding apple, with the egg of a coddling moth.

This illustration shows a tree that has been body-budded. It has two buds that had been killed by bud-moth larva.

Body-budding

This illustration shows a tree that has been body-budded. It has two buds that had been killed by bud-moth…

This illustration shows a tree that has been both branch-budded and grafted. Buds inserted in August. Bud on A lived. Buds on B, B, and B died, and these branches were grafted the following spring.

Bud and Graft

This illustration shows a tree that has been both branch-budded and grafted. Buds inserted in August.…

(a) twig having suitable buds to use; (b) method of cutting the bud off; (c) how the bark is cut; (d) how the bark is opened; (e) inserting the bud; (f) the bud in place; (g) the bud properly wrapped

Budding

(a) twig having suitable buds to use; (b) method of cutting the bud off; (c) how the bark is cut; (d)…

This illustration shows a tree that has been both body and branch-budded.

Budding

This illustration shows a tree that has been both body and branch-budded.

Some blades, such as the first two, are made with a rounded point to cut the bark without the knife entering the wood underneath. The middle two knives are made with the edge of the knife carrying to a point and are used for ordinary purposes. The last knife has a piece of ivory inserted for opening the bark.

Budding Knives

Some blades, such as the first two, are made with a rounded point to cut the bark without the knife…

The budding completed

The budding, complete

The budding completed

"Various stages of cell multiplication by budding of Saccharomyces cerevisiae." -Stevens, 1916

S. Cerevisiae Cell Multiplication

"Various stages of cell multiplication by budding of Saccharomyces cerevisiae." -Stevens, 1916

In flute budding a cylinder of bark is removed from the stock, and a piece of twig in a similar size is removed. The cylinder of bark is fitted into place and made airtight.

Flute-Budding

In flute budding a cylinder of bark is removed from the stock, and a piece of twig in a similar size…

A ring of bark is removed in ring budding and replaced with a piece from a larger branch. When replaced the fit must be airtight.

Ring Budding

A ring of bark is removed in ring budding and replaced with a piece from a larger branch. When replaced…

"Budding. a, Budstick; b, T-shaped cut in bark of stock; c, bud ready for insertion; d, stock with bud inserted; e, the same tied up with raffia." -Gager, 1916

Budding Grafting

"Budding. a, Budstick; b, T-shaped cut in bark of stock; c, bud ready for insertion; d, stock with bud…

This is a tall briar with three shoots. A shows the shoot slit for the bud. B shows the bud inserted. C shows the bud tied in.

Rose Budding

This is a tall briar with three shoots. A shows the shoot slit for the bud. B shows the bud inserted.…

This is a branch showing buds. The lower buds are the most suitable because they are in firmer wood. The top buds are usually useless.

Branch showing Rose Buds

This is a branch showing buds. The lower buds are the most suitable because they are in firmer wood.…

The left figure shows a bud taken from a budding branch. The right figure shows wood removed from the lower end of a budding branch.

Bud Taken from Rose Budding

The left figure shows a bud taken from a budding branch. The right figure shows wood removed from the…

Shoots of briar must be cut back before the rose buds once the buds are safely established.

Shoots of Briar

Shoots of briar must be cut back before the rose buds once the buds are safely established.

"The simplest and most generally practised form of budding is that called Shield budding or T-budding. The operator should be provided with a budding-knife in which the cutting edge of the blade is rounded off at the point, and which has a thin ivory or bone handle, for raising the bark of the stock. A horizonal incision is made in the bark quite down to the wood, and from this a perpendicular slit is drawn downwards to the extent of perhaps an inch, so that the slit has a resemblance to the letter T, as at a. A bud is then cut by a clean incision from the tree intended to be propagated, having a portion of the wood attached to it, and so that the whole may be an inch and a half long, as at d." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Shield-Budding

"The simplest and most generally practised form of budding is that called Shield budding or T-budding.…

In shield-budding the bark should first have two incisions, a length wise incision one inch long, and an incision around the bark (figures a and b). The bud should then be prepared by removing half the leaf.

Shield Budding

In shield-budding the bark should first have two incisions, a length wise incision one inch long, and…