Lancelot Andrewes (1555 – 25 September 1626) was an English clergyman and scholar, who held high positions in the Church of England during the reigns of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. During the latter's reign, Andrewes served as successively as Bishop of Chichester, Ely and Winchester; and oversaw the translation of the Authorized Version (or King James Version) of the Bible. In the Church of England he is commemorated on 25 September with a Lesser Festival.

Bishop Lancelot Andrewes

Lancelot Andrewes (1555 – 25 September 1626) was an English clergyman and scholar, who held high positions…

The Cistercian Abbey of St Mary and St Chad was founded in 1135 by Roger de Clinton, Bishop of Coventry (1129–1148). The abbey's location near the border of Wales meant it was destined to have a turbulent history. The abbey was closed in 1536 by the order of Henry VIII during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, whereupon the estate was granted to Lord Powis.

Buildwas Abbey (Cistercian)

The Cistercian Abbey of St Mary and St Chad was founded in 1135 by Roger de Clinton, Bishop of Coventry…

After the Norman conquest in 1066, Lanfranc (1070-1077) became the first Norman archbishop. He thoroughly rebuilt the ruined Saxon cathedral in a Norman design based strong on the Abbey of St. Etienne in Caen, of which he had previously been abbot. The new cathedral was dedicated in 1077.

Norman Door, Canterbury Cathedral

After the Norman conquest in 1066, Lanfranc (1070-1077) became the first Norman archbishop. He thoroughly…

It was begun during the reign of King Henry I by the first Bishop of Carlisle, the Englishman Athelwold (1133-1155), who built a moderate-sized Norman minster of which the transepts and part of the nave still exist. The present cathedral has fine examples of stone tracery, mediæval stained glass, paintings and carvings. The building is made of red sandstone, which due to local weather at some places appears black.

Carlisle Cathedral

It was begun during the reign of King Henry I by the first Bishop of Carlisle, the Englishman Athelwold…

Built between 1175 and 1490, Wells Cathedral has been described as "the most poetic of the English Cathedrals". Much of the structure is in the Early English style and is greatly enriched by the deeply sculptural nature of the mouldings and the vitality of the carved capitals in a foliate style known as "stiff leaf". The eastern end has retained much original glass, which is rare in England. The exterior has a splendid Early English façade and a large central tower.

Wells Cathedral, Somerset

Built between 1175 and 1490, Wells Cathedral has been described as "the most poetic of the English Cathedrals".…

Charles I, (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from March 27, 1625 until his execution. Charles famously engaged in a struggle for power with the Parliament of England. He was an advocate of the Divine Right of Kings, and many subjects of England feared that he was attempting to gain absolute power. Many of his actions, particularly the levying of taxes without Parliament's consent, caused widespread opposition.

Charles I of England

Charles I, (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from…

Formerly it was the parish church of Chelsea when it was a village, before it was engulfed by London. The building originally consisted of a 13th century chancel with chapels to the north and south (c.1325) and a nave and tower built in 1670.

Old Church at Chelsea

Formerly it was the parish church of Chelsea when it was a village, before it was engulfed by London.…

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one of the finest examples of a Norman cathedral in Europe and has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site along with nearby Durham Castle, which faces it across Palace Green, high above the River Wear.

Durham Cathedral

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one…

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one of the finest examples of a Norman cathedral in Europe and has been designated a <abbr title="United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization">UNESCO</abbr> World Heritage Site along with nearby Durham Castle, which faces it across Palace Green, high above the River Wear.

Durham Cathedral from the Wear

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one…

Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal church of the diocese of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, England, and the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Ely. It is known locally as "the ship of the Fens", because of its prominent shape that towers above the surrounding flat and watery landscape.

Ely Cathedral

Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal…

John Cardinal Fisher (c.1469 &ndash; 22 June 1535), from 1935 Saint John Fisher, was an English Catholic bishop, cardinal and martyr. He shares his feast day with Saint Thomas More on June 22 in the Roman Catholic calendar of saints and 6 July on the Anglican calendar of saints. Fisher and More were executed by King Henry VIII during the English Reformation for refusing to accept him as Head of the Church of England. He is the only member of the College of Cardinals to have suffered martyrdom.

John Cardinal Fisher

John Cardinal Fisher (c.1469 – 22 June 1535), from 1935 Saint John Fisher, was an English Catholic…

Sanctuary was also a right to be safe from arrest in the sanctuary of a church or temple, recognized by English law from the fourth to the seventeenth century.

Fugitive Claiming Sanctuary

Sanctuary was also a right to be safe from arrest in the sanctuary of a church or temple, recognized…

Greensted Church, in the small village of Greensted, near Chipping Ongar in Essex, England, is the oldest wooden church in the world, and probably the oldest wooden building in Europe still standing, albeit only in part, since few sections of its original wooden structure remain. The oak palisade walls are often classified as remnants of a palisade church or a kind of early stave church, dated either to the mid-9th or mid-11th century.

Greenstead Church

Greensted Church, in the small village of Greensted, near Chipping Ongar in Essex, England, is the oldest…

It was the tallest building in the world for over 200 years (1300-1549), but the central spire collapsed in the sixteenth century and was not rebuilt. William the Conqueror ordered the first cathedral to be built in Lincoln, in 1072.

Lincoln Cathedral

It was the tallest building in the world for over 200 years (1300-1549), but the central spire collapsed…

Old St. Paul's is a name used to refer to the Gothic cathedral in the City of London built between 1087 and 1314. At its peak, the cathedral was the third longest church in Europe and had one of the tallest spires. Old St Paul's was completely gutted in the Great Fire of London of 1666, which destroyed the roof and much of the stonework. Temporary repairs were made to the building, but while it might have been salvageable, albeit with almost complete reconstruction, a decision was taken to build a new cathedral in a modern style instead, a step which had been contemplated even before the fire.

Old St. Paul's Cathedral

Old St. Paul's is a name used to refer to the Gothic cathedral in the City of London built between 1087…

Old St. Paul's is a name used to refer to the Gothic cathedral in the City of London built between 1087 and 1314. At its peak, the cathedral was the third longest church in Europe and had one of the tallest spires. The cathedral was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666, and the current domed St. Paul's Cathedral &mdash; in an English Baroque style &mdash; was subsequently erected on the site by Sir Christopher Wren.

Chapter House of Old St. Paul's

Old St. Paul's is a name used to refer to the Gothic cathedral in the City of London built between 1087…

A Puritan of 16th and 17th century England was an associate of any number of religious groups advocating for more "purity" of worship and doctrine, as well as personal and group piety. Puritans felt that the English Reformation had not gone far enough, and that the Church of England was tolerant of practices which they associated with the Church of Rome. The word "Puritan" was originally an alternate term for "Cathar" and was a pejorative used to characterize them as extremists similar to the Cathari of France. The Puritans sometimes cooperated with presbyterians, who put forth a number of proposals for "further reformation" in order to keep the Church of England more closely in line with the Reformed Churches on the Continent.

Puritan Costumes

A Puritan of 16th and 17th century England was an associate of any number of religious groups advocating…

Salisbury Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Salisbury, England, considered one of the leading examples of Early English architecture. The cathedral has the tallest church spire in the United Kingdom (123m or 404ft).

Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Salisbury, England, considered one of the leading examples…

St. Alban's Abbey, Mainz (Stift St. Alban vor Mainz) originated as a Benedictine abbey, founded in 787 or 796 by Archbishop Richulf (787-813) in honour of Saint Alban of Mainz, located to the south of Mainz on the hill later called the Albansberg. It was turned into a collegiate foundation (Herrenstift) in 1442. The buildings were entirely destroyed in 1552, although the foundation retained a legal existence until its formal dissolution in 1802.

St. Alban's Abbey before the Modern Restoration

St. Alban's Abbey, Mainz (Stift St. Alban vor Mainz) originated as a Benedictine abbey, founded in 787…

The monastic community was founded by Saint David, Abbot of Menevia, who died in AD589. Between AD645 and 1097, the community was attacked many times by raiders, including the Vikings, however it was of such note as both a religious and intellectual centre that King Alfred summoned help from the monastic community at St David's in rebuilding the intellectual life of the Kingdom of Wessex.

St. David's Cathedral

The monastic community was founded by Saint David, Abbot of Menevia, who died in AD589. Between AD645…

St. John's Chapel, or the Chapel of St. John the Evangelist, is located in the Tower of London. Dating from 1080, this complete 11th century church is the oldest church in London. A beautiful Romanesque chapel, St. John's is on the second floor of the White Tower, which was built in 1077-97 as a keep or citadel, the oldest part of William the Conqueror's powerful fortress.

St. John's Chapel in the Tower

St. John's Chapel, or the Chapel of St. John the Evangelist, is located in the Tower of London. Dating…

The original Saxon church on the site was dedicated to St. Edmund the King and Martyr. During the Crusades in the 12th century the church was renamed St. Edmund and the Holy Sepulchre, in reference to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. The name eventually became contracted to St Sepulchre.

St. Sepulchre's, Cambridge

The original Saxon church on the site was dedicated to St. Edmund the King and Martyr. During the Crusades…

Tintern Abbey was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on May 9, 1131. Situated on the River Wye in Monmouthshire, it was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. The present-day remains of Tintern are a mixture of building works covering a 400-year period between 1136 and 1536. Very little remains of the first buildings; a few sections of walling are incorporated into later buildings and the two recessed cupboards for books on the east of the cloisters are from this period.

Tintern Abbey, Cisternian

Tintern Abbey was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on May 9, 1131. Situated on the River…

The transept is the area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building in Romanesque and Gothic Christian church architecture.

Transept of the Martyrdom

The transept is the area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building in Romanesque…

Thomas Cardinal Wolsey (c.1470~1471 &ndash; November 28 or November 29, 1530), who was born in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, was an English statesman and a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. Wolsey's affairs prospered and by 1514 he had become the controlling figure in all matters of state and extremely powerful within the Church. The highest political position he attained was Lord Chancellor, the King's chief advisor, enjoying great freedom and often depicted as an alter rex (other king). Within the Church he became archbishop of York, the second most important see in England, and then was made a cardinal in 1515, giving him precedence over even the Archbishop of Canterbury. His main legacy is from his interest in architecture, in particular his old home of Hampton Court Palace, which stands today.

Thomas Cardinal Wolsey

Thomas Cardinal Wolsey (c.1470~1471 – November 28 or November 29, 1530), who was born in Ipswich,…