All Saints Church in Wilden, Worcestershire about one mile to the north east of Stourport. It was designed by W J Hopkins with funds provided by Alfred Baldwin very close to his own home, Wilden House and one of his large iron works. It served the Baldwin family and their employees and was consecrated in 1880.

Church of All Saints, Wilden, Worcestershire

All Saints Church in Wilden, Worcestershire about one mile to the north east of Stourport. It was designed…

He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History of the English People) gained him the title "The father of English history". Bede is regarded as a Doctor of the Church by the Roman Catholic Church, a position of theological significance; he is the only man from Great Britain to achieve this designation.

Bede's Tomb, Durham Cathedral

He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum…

It is generally regarded as the most impressive (architecturally speaking) church in England that is not a cathedral. Originally a collegiate church, it was not selected as a bishop's seat during the Dissolution of the Monasteries; nevertheless it survived as a parish church, and the chapter house was the only major part of the building to be lost.

Beverly Minster

It is generally regarded as the most impressive (architecturally speaking) church in England that is…

The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity is the Anglican cathedral in the city of Bristol, England, and is commonly known as Bristol Cathedral. Founded in 1140, it became the seat of the bishop and cathedral of the new Diocese of Bristol in 1542. The cathedral has much of interest including unique architectural features, unusual memorials and a large historic organ.Bristol Cathedral was founded as St Augustine's Abbey in 1140 by Robert Fitzharding, a wealthy local landowner and royal official. As the name suggests, the monastic precinct housed Augustinian canons.

Bristol Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity is the Anglican cathedral in the city of Bristol,…

Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 O.S. – June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher. He is known, among other things, for his critique of Thomas Hobbes's egoism and John Locke's theory of personal identity. During his life and after his death, Butler influenced many philosophers, including David Hume, Thomas Reid, and Adam Smith. He is most famous for his Fifteen Sermons Preached at the Rolls Chapel (1726) and Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed (1736).

Bishop Joseph Butler

Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 O.S. – June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and…

The Church Mission Society, known as the Church Missionary Society in Australia and New Zealand, is a group of evangelistic societies working with the Anglican Church and other Protestant Christians around the world. Founded in 1799, CMS has attracted upwards of nine thousand men and women to serve as mission partners during its 200-year history. A religious Mission or Mission station is a location for missionary work.

CMS Mission Station, Island of Deshimo, Japan

The Church Mission Society, known as the Church Missionary Society in Australia and New Zealand, is…

Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal church of the Diocese of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, England, and the seat of the Bishop of Ely. It is known locally as "the ship of the Fens", because of its prominent shape that towers above the surrounding flat and watery landscape.

Ely Cathedral

Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal…

Eyam churchyard contains a Saxon cross dated to the 7th or 8th centuries. Initially, it was located at the side of a cart track near to Eyam. After the plague it was moved to its present location.

Eyam Churchyard Cross

Eyam churchyard contains a Saxon cross dated to the 7th or 8th centuries. Initially, it was located…

Having taken holy orders in 1807, he took up the family living of Hodnet in Shropshire. In 1809 he married Amelia Shipley, daughter of the Dean of St Asaph. He was made prebendary of St Asaph in 1812, appointed Bampton lecturer for 1815, preacher at Lincoln's Inn in 1822, and Bishop of Calcutta in January 1823. Before sailing for India he received the degree of D.D. from the University of Oxford. In India, Bishop Heber laboured indefatigably - not only for the good of his own diocese, but for the spread of Christianity throughout the East. He toured the country, consecrating churches, founding schools and discharging other Christian duties. Heber was a pious man of profound learning, literary taste and great practical energy. His fame rests mainly on his hymns.

Bishop Reginald Heber

Having taken holy orders in 1807, he took up the family living of Hodnet in Shropshire. In 1809 he married…

In the war between King and Parliament (the English Civil War) the city of Hereford fell into the hands first of one party, then of the other. Once it endured a siege, and when it was taken the conquerors ran riot in the cathedral and, in their fury, caused great damage which could never be repaired. In the early years of the 18th century, Bishop Bisse (1712-21), devised a scheme to support the central tower. He also had installed an enormous altar-piece and an oak screen, and instead of restoring the Chapter House he allowed its stones to be utilized for alterations to the Bishop's Palace.

Hereford Cathedral

In the war between King and Parliament (the English Civil War) the city of Hereford fell into the hands…

There has been a church on the site for over 1300 years since Etheldreda, Queen of Northumbria made a grant of lands to Wilfrid, Bishop of York c.674. Of Wilfrid's Benedictine abbey, which was constructed almost entirely of material salvaged from nearby Roman ruins, the Saxon crypt and apse still remain.

Hexham Abbey

There has been a church on the site for over 1300 years since Etheldreda, Queen of Northumbria made…

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies the ancient priory church building and is one of the oldest churches in Great Britain. The tower dates from Norman times, and doubtless formed part of the building as restored after the Conquest.

Jarrow Church Tower

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies…

Melrose Abbey is a Gothic-style abbey in Melrose, Scotland. It was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland. In 1544, as English armies raged across Scotland and badly damaged the Abbey which was never fully repaired.

Melrose Abbey Ruins

Melrose Abbey is a Gothic-style abbey in Melrose, Scotland. It was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks,…

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies the ancient priory church building and is one of the oldest churches in Great Britain. The tower dates from Norman times, and doubtless formed part of the building as restored after the Conquest.

Monkwearmouth Church

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies…

John Coleridge Patteson (April 1, 1827 – September 20, 1871) was an Anglican bishop and martyr. On 20 September 1871 he was murdered on the island of Nukapu in the Solomon Islands, where he had landed alone. Natives killed him as revenge against the abduction of some natives by white men months earlier. His death became a cause celebre in England and increased interest both in missionary work and in improvement of the working conditions in Melanesia. His life is celebrated in the Church of England as a saintly one.

Bishop Patteson's House, Norfolk Island

John Coleridge Patteson (April 1, 1827 – September 20, 1871) was an Anglican bishop and martyr.…

" Edward Bouverie, D.D., after whom the Tractarian movement in the Church of England became designated Puseyiam. (1800-1882)" -Marshall

Rev. Dr. Pusey

" Edward Bouverie, D.D., after whom the Tractarian movement in the Church of England became designated…

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became Dean of St. Paul's in 1664, greatly assisting with the rebuilding after the Great Fire of London, towards which he contributed £1400. In 1677, being now prolocutor of the Convocation, he was unexpectedly advanced to the archbishopric of Canterbury. He attended Charles II upon his deathbed, and "made to him a very weighty exhortation, in which he used a good degree of freedom." He crowned King James II in 1685.

Archbishop William Sancroft

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became…

It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for over 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since 1905. Henry Cardinal Beaufort repaired the church after a 1212 fire. The main structure of the present church was built between 1220 and 1420, making it the first Gothic church in London. Heresy trials occurred in the Galilee chapel in 1555, under Mary I of England.

Choir of St. Saviour's, Southwark

It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship…

The Collegiate Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon is a parish church in the Church of England. It is often known simply as Shakespeare's Church, due to its fame as the place of baptism and burial of William Shakespeare. The present building dates from 1210 and is built on the site of a Saxon monastery. It is Stratford's oldest building, in a striking position on the banks of the River Avon, and has long been England's most visited parish church.

Stratford-on-Avon Church

The Collegiate Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon is a parish church in the…

Jeremy Taylor (1613 – 13 August 1667) was a clergyman in the Church of England who achieved fame as an author during The Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell. He is sometimes known as the "Shakespeare of Divines" for his poetic style of expression and was often presented as a model of prose writing. He was under the patronage of William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury. He went on to become chaplain in ordinary to King Charles I as a result of Laud's sponsorship. This made him politically suspect when Laud was tried for treason and executed in 1645 by the Puritan Parliament during the English Civil War. After the Parliamentary victory over the King, he was briefly imprisoned several times.

Bishop Jeremy Taylor

Jeremy Taylor (1613 – 13 August 1667) was a clergyman in the Church of England who achieved fame…

John Wesley (June 28 1703 – March 2, 1791) was an Anglican minister and Christian theologian who was the founder of the (Evangelical) Arminian Methodist movement. Methodism began as an unflattering nickname of the "Holy Club" at Oxford University founded by Charles Wesley but led by brother John. Methodism was well advanced in England through George Whitefield who had taken over the responsibility of the Holy Club while the Wesley brothers were in Savannah, Georgia British North America. On John Wesley's return to England in 1737 he publically criticised Whitefield for his evangelical preaching.

John Wesley

John Wesley (June 28 1703 – March 2, 1791) was an Anglican minister and Christian theologian who was…

A Church of England cleric who is credited as the founder of the Methodist movement.

John Wesley

A Church of England cleric who is credited as the founder of the Methodist movement.

George Whitefield (December 16, 1714 – September 30, 1770), was a preacher in the Church of England and one of the leaders of the Methodist movement. He first took to preaching in the open air on Hanham Mount, Kingswood, in southeast Bristol. A crowd of 20,000 people gathered to hear him. Even larger crowds – Whitefield himself estimated 30,000 – met him in Cambuslang in 1742. Benjamin Franklin once attended a revival meeting in Philadelphia and was greatly impressed with Whitefield's ability to deliver a message to such a large audience.

George Whitefield

George Whitefield (December 16, 1714 – September 30, 1770), was a preacher in the Church of England…

Thomas Wilson (20 December 1663 – 7 March 1755) was Anglican Bishop of Sodor and Man between 1697 and 1755. When he came to the Isle of Man, he found the buildings of the diocese in a ruinous condition. The building of new churches was one of his first acts, and he eventually rebuilt most of the churches of the diocese along with establishing public libraries. Wilson worked to restore ecclesiastical discipline on the island, although he clashed with civil authorities partly because of the reduction of revenue from Wilson mitigating fines in the spiritual court.

Bishop Thomas Wilson

Thomas Wilson (20 December 1663 – 7 March 1755) was Anglican Bishop of Sodor and Man between 1697…