"Rear Admiral Wilkes, born in New York city, April 3rd, 1798, died in Washington, D. C., February 8th, 1877. He entered the navy as a midshipman, January 1st, 1818, and was promoted to lieutenant, April 28th, 1826. He served several years in the Mediterranean Sea and the Pacific Ocean. In 1843 Wilkes was on coast survey duty, being commissioned commander, July 13th, 1843; captain, September 14th, 1855; and placed in command of the sloop of war <em>San Jacinto</em> in 1861, on the outbreak of the Civil War. His first duty was the pursuit of the Confederate war vessel <em>Sumter</em>. On November 8th the <em>San Jacinto</em> encountered the English mail steamer <em>Trent</em>, which was on its way from Havana to St. Thomas, West Indies, having on board the Confederate Commissioners to France and Great Britain- John Slidell, of Louisiana, and James M. Mason, of Virginia- with their secretaries. On overtaking the <em>Trent</em> Wilkes ordered Lieutenant Fairfax to bring them off. The officials were removed to the <em>San Jacinto</em>, in which they were taken to Fort Warren, in Boston harbor. In 1862 Wilkes commanded the James River Flotilla, and shelled City Point. He was promoted to commodore on July 16th, 1862, and took charge of a special squadron in the West Indies. He was placed on the retired list, because of age, June 25th, 1864, and promoted to rear admiral on the retired list, July 25th, 1866."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Rear Admiral Charles Wilkes

"Rear Admiral Wilkes, born in New York city, April 3rd, 1798, died in Washington, D. C., February 8th,…

"Battle of Williamsburg, Va., on the peninsula between York and James Rivers, May 6th, 1862. General Hancock's sudden charge decided the battle, for it left the real key of the position in Federal hands. With the re-enforcements with McClellan had caused to be sent him immediately upon reaching the scene, late in the afternoon. Hancock took possession of all the ground he had previously occupied, and night closed upon what proved to be a dearly bought victory for the Federals. They had, in fact, gained it after substaining a loss of 2,228 in killed and wounded, the Confederate loss being only about half that number. Early on the 6th of May Williamsburg was occupied by the Federals, while Johnston's army was again beyond the Chickahominy."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Williamsburg

"Battle of Williamsburg, Va., on the peninsula between York and James Rivers, May 6th, 1862. General…

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged with the enemy. This desperate battle between the Confederates on one hand and the divisions of General Heintzelman and Franklin on the other was fought on the morning of Monday, June 30th, 1862, at Willis Church, a place midway between the White Oak Swamp Bridge and Turkey Bend, where, later in the day, another fierce fight raged, the week of combat being closed next day by the deadly but drawn battle of Malvern Hill. Our sketch represents the position of part of the Federal army at ten o'clock in the morning, just as the battle was commencing. The baggage train is in the foreground, and the enemy is advancing upon the Federal lines, and covering the advance with a heavy shower of shells. Willis Church is on the left of the illustration, being what most of the Southern places of worship were, mere wooden barns." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Battle at Willis Church

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged…

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged with the enemy. This desperate battle between the Confederates on one hand and the divisions of General Heintzelman and Franklin on the other was fought on the morning of Monday, June 30th, 1862, at Willis Church, a place midway between the White Oak Swamp Bridge and Turkey Bend, where, later in the day, another fierce fight raged, the week of combat being closed next day by the deadly but drawn battle of Malvern Hill. Our sketch represents the position of part of the Federal army at ten o'clock in the morning, just as the battle was commencing. The baggage train is in the foreground, and the enemy is advancing upon the Federal lines, and covering the advance with a heavy shower of shells. Willis Church is on the left of the illustration, being what most of the Southern places of worship were, mere wooden barns." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Battle at Willis Church

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged…

(1843-1900) American statesman, served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, and was the president of the University of West Virginia.

William L. Wilson

(1843-1900) American statesman, served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, and was the president…

"Sheridan's Campaign. Battle of Winchester- charge of Crook's Eighth Corps, September 19th, 1864- the right. Our sketches of this signal victory show the operations of the Eighth Corps on the right. In the foreground are Crook's veterans advancing to attack the forts on the right, which command Winchester, and which they took so gallantly by the aid of Averill's cavalry. The Federals, it will be perceived, charged under the fire of these forts as well as of the fire of the Confederates posted behind the broken stone wall and rail fence on the left, behind which may be seen the distant summit of Strasburg Mountain. Nor was this the only fighting. The centre nobly did its share, driving the Confederates from the woods to the right of our second sketch, and when they regained it forcing them again into the deadly grasp of Crook, literally filling the woods with dead."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Winchester Charge

"Sheridan's Campaign. Battle of Winchester- charge of Crook's Eighth Corps, September 19th, 1864- the…

"Battle of Winchester, VA., March 23rd, 1862- decisive bayonet charge of the Federal troops, led by General Tyler. The contest raged furiously till three o'clock in the afternoon, the fighting being done chiefly by the artillery and the musketry, at a range of not more than three or four hundred yards, and often much less. The Confederate infantry opposite the right now debouched from the woods, and attempted to capture Doan's battery by a charge. The first effort was nearly successful, but the heavy discharge of grape compelled them to retire in confusion. A second and weaker attempt likewise failed, and the enemy fell back, with heavy loss, behind the stone parapet. General Tyler then ordered his brigade to charge the enemy's batteries on the left, and a most deadly encounter followed. Twice the Federals reeled under storm; but in the third effort they routed the Confederates with tremendous slaughter, amid loud cheering, capturing two of their guns and four caissons." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Winchester

"Battle of Winchester, VA., March 23rd, 1862- decisive bayonet charge of the Federal troops, led by…

"Sheridan's Campaign- Battle of Winchester- position of the Nineteenth Corps, General Emory, September 19th, 18640 the centre."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Winchester

"Sheridan's Campaign- Battle of Winchester- position of the Nineteenth Corps, General Emory, September…

"Sheridan's Campaign- an incident at the Battle of Winchester- a faithful dog watching and defending the dead body of his Confederate master."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Dog at Winchester

"Sheridan's Campaign- an incident at the Battle of Winchester- a faithful dog watching and defending…

"Rear Admiral Winslow, born in Wilmington, N. C., November 19th, 1811, died in Boston, Mass., September 29th, 1873. He entered the navy as a midshipman, February 1st, 1827, and was made a lieutenant, February 9th, 1839. He was commissioned captain, July 16th, 1862, and commanded the steamer <em>Kearsarge</em> on special service in 1863-'64, in pursuit of the <em>Alabama</em>. Captain Winslow arrived off Cherbourg, June 14th, 1864, where he found the <em>Alabama</em>, and blockaded her in the harbor. The <em>Alabama</em> made preparations for fight, and Captain Raphael Semmes caused Winslow to be informed of this intention through the United States Consul. On Sunday, June 19th, 1864, he was lying three miles off the eastern entrance of the harbor when the <em>Alabama</em> came out. Winslow steamed off seven miles from the shore so as to be beyond the neutral ground, and then steamed toward the <em>Alabama</em>. The engagement lasted one hour and twenty minutes. After the last shot was fired the <em>Alabama</em> sank out of sight."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Rear Admiral John A. Winslow

"Rear Admiral Winslow, born in Wilmington, N. C., November 19th, 1811, died in Boston, Mass., September…

"Winter quarters on the Rappahannock- army huts of the One Hundred and Nineteenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, near Falmouth, Va."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Winter quarters

"Winter quarters on the Rappahannock- army huts of the One Hundred and Nineteenth Regiment, Pennsylvania…

Soldiers outside a few tents.

Winter Scene in Camp

Soldiers outside a few tents.

(1828-1861) American military officer. Killed during the Civil War while at the head of an assaulting column of Northern troops at Big Bethel, Virginia.

Theodore Winthrop

(1828-1861) American military officer. Killed during the Civil War while at the head of an assaulting…

Henry Augustus Wise (1819 - 1869) was a U.S. Naval Officer who served in the U.S. - Mexican War and the Civil War as a captain.

Henry Augustus Wise

Henry Augustus Wise (1819 - 1869) was a U.S. Naval Officer who served in the U.S. - Mexican War and…

"Camp Wool, two miles from Fort Clark, Hatteras Island, occupied by Hawkins's Zouaves, Ninth Regiment, New York Volunteers, in October, 1861. Camp Wool, which was occupied by the New York Ninth Regiment of Volunteers, was about two miles from Fort Hatteras, and situated on the Pamlico side of the island, in order to be partially sheltered from the Atlantic gales. Besides, as any sudden attack must come from the sound, it put the troops in a better spot to keep a bright look out. The Ninth Zouaves were in an excellent state of discipline, and reflected great credit upon their colonel, Rush Hawkins, who fought his way bravely through the Mexican war. It numbered one thousand and forty-six men. Until the unfortunate capture of the <em>Fanny</em>, it had not lost a single man, although it had been engaged in numerous skirmishes with the Confederates at Newport News." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Camp Wool

"Camp Wool, two miles from Fort Clark, Hatteras Island, occupied by Hawkins's Zouaves, Ninth Regiment,…

"General Wool was a general in the civil war."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General John E. Wool

"General Wool was a general in the civil war."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Towing the wounded Federal soldiers down the bayou on a raft, on the night of January 14th, 1863, after the Battle of Bayou Teche, La. General Banks had arranged to stop the depredations which the Confederate steamer <em>J. A. Cotton</em> had been long committing along the Bayou Teche. He had advanced from Labadieville on January 11th with four gunboats, ten regiments of infantry and one of artillery, reaching Carney's Bridge, near Pattersonville, early on the 14th. Their progress here was stopped by several earthworks, under whose guns lay the <em>J. A. Cotton</em>. Early on the 15th Commander McKean Buchanan opened fire from the <em>Calhoun</em>, and was joined in it by the other gunboats, while the troops were advancing on shore to engage the Confederate vessels and batteries from the rear. The troops were not long in subjecting their enemy to a fierce enfilading musketry and artillery fire from the woods; and such was its destructive effect that the <em>J. A. Cotton</em> had finally to retire toward an upper battery at Butte La Rose, on the Atchafalaya. Early on the following morning the <em>J. A. Cotton</em> was seen floating down the bayou in a sheet of flame, having been set afire and abandoned by the Confederates. The troops, therefore, returned to Brashcar City, the Federal wounded having been meanwhile placed on a raft and towed down the river."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Wounded Federals

"Towing the wounded Federal soldiers down the bayou on a raft, on the night of January 14th, 1863, after…

"The mouth of the Yazoo River, Miss., with the Union Flotilla."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Yazoo River

"The mouth of the Yazoo River, Miss., with the Union Flotilla."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Desperate naval combat between the Confederate iron-plated ram <em>Arkansas</em> and the Federal gunboat <em>Carondelet</em>, at the mouth of the Yazoo River, Tuesday, July 15th, 1862. Next to the ever-memorable combat between the <em>Merrimac</em> and the <em>Monitor</em>, that of the <em>Carondelet</em> and the <em>Arkansas</em> was the most exciting. Like the former engagement, it ended in a drawn battle. On July 14th, 1862, the gunboats <em>Carondelet</em> and <em>Tyler</em> were sent by Commodore Farragut to survey the Yazoo River and ascertain the exact condition of the Confederate iron-plated ram <em>Arkansas</em>, about which there were various reports. They arrived at the mouth of the Yazoo, fifteen miles above Vicksburg, at seven o'clock in the evening, and anchored for the night. Next morning at daylight they tipped anchor and slowly steamed up the Yazoo, the <em>Tyler</em> considerably in advance. About two miles up the river smoke was seen across a little point of land, which, as Captain Gwin of the <em>Tyler</em> surmised, proceeded from the Confederate ram, now rapidly steaming toward the <em>Tyler</em>. In another moment a heavy report was heard from the enigmatical gunboat, and a huge round shot went howling over the deck of the <em>Tyler</em>. Captain Walke of the <em>Carondelet</em> ordered the <em>Tyler</em> to proceed with all speed to alarm the fleet and advise it to prepare for her approach while he engaged the Confederate monster. In ten minutes afterward the <em>Carondelet</em> and <em>Arkansas</em> were alongside each other, and the conflict commenced in earnest. The <em>Carondelet</em> commenced with her bow guns, striking her opponent with a rapidity and precision which the enormous strength of the iron plating alone prevented taking immediate effect. The <em>Arkansas</em> used in return her rifled and guns with terrible effect, some of the shots going right through the <em>Carondelet</em>. Seeing her inability to cope with her antagonist, Captain Walke ran the <em>Carondelet</em> alongside the <em>Arkansas</em> and grappled her. The order "Boarders away!" was instantly passed, and the crew of the Federal gunboat speedily mounted the deck of its adversary. When there they found no foe to engage. The crew of the Arkansas had retired below, and the iron hatches were closed, so that it was uttlerly impossible to go down and continue the action." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Combat at Yazoo River

"Desperate naval combat between the Confederate iron-plated ram Arkansas and the Federal gunboat…

"A detachment of United States sailors from the gunboats <em>Albatross</em> and <em>Gemsbok</em> burning the contraband vessel <em>York</em>. Mouth of Rogue's inlet, near Beaufort, N. C., January 23rd, 1862." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Burning of York

"A detachment of United States sailors from the gunboats Albatross and Gemsbok burning…

"Second charge upon the Confederates by General Fremont's bodyguard, under Major Zagonyi, near Springfield, Mo., on October 25th, 1861. After the first charge of Major Zagonyi, described on another page, Captain McNaughton reached the scene with fifty men. The order to follow retreating Confederates was given, and all dashed ahead for a second charge through the woods. Many of the fugitives were overtaken there, as well as in the streets of Springfield and in the forest beyond the city. Only when further pursuit seemed useless did the Federals return. Zagonyi's brave followers suffered a loss of eighty-four dead and wounded in this engagement, which, for the boldness of its undertaking and the rapidity of its execution under the great disparity of numbers, certainly has but few parallels in any history."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Major Zagonyi

"Second charge upon the Confederates by General Fremont's bodyguard, under Major Zagonyi, near Springfield,…

"Group of Ellsworth's Chicago Zouave Cadets. No military organization during the war was more brilliant than the Chicago Zouave Cadets, with their striking and gay uniforms; their flowing red pants; their jaunty crimson caps; their peculiar drab gaiters and leggings, and the loose blue jackets, with rows of small, sparkling buttons, and the light-blue shirt beneath. In all their evolutions the Zouaves displayed great precision."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Zouave Cadets

"Group of Ellsworth's Chicago Zouave Cadets. No military organization during the war was more brilliant…

"Encampment of Colonel Ellsworth's New York Fire Zuoaves, on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington, D. C. This famous body of fiery and active soldiers at length got free from the trammels and confinement of their city quarters, a change which was both pleasant and beneficial to them. They were encamped on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington, D. C., and, as our sketch will show, were most comfortably situated. Colonel Ellsworth was indefatigable in drilling his regiment, and his men most willingly seconded his efforts by close attention to duty and alacrity in the performance of all the details of camp life. The Zuoaves proved to be one of the most effective regiments in the field; they rendered efficent service in building breastworks on the outskirts of Alexandria, thereby preyenting the possibility of a surprise from the enemy, and distinguished themselves at the Battle of Bull Run in their successful assault on a confederate battery at the point of the bayonet." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Zouaves

"Encampment of Colonel Ellsworth's New York Fire Zuoaves, on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington,…

"The ('Billy') Wilson Zouaves, at Tammany Hall, taking the oath of fidelity to the flag, April 24th, 1861. Colonel Wilson was among the first to offer his services to the government on the breaking out of the war. He recruited a regiment of nearly twelve hundred men from the rowdy and criminal classes of New York city. The regiment was formally mustered in the old Tammany Hall, and there, on April 24th, with the men arranged around the room, with the officers in the centre, the colonel, with a sword in one hand and the American flag in the other, led the men into swearing to 'support the flag and never to flinch from its path through blood or death.' The Zouaves, a few days afterward, left for the South."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Billy Wilson Zouaves

"The ('Billy') Wilson Zouaves, at Tammany Hall, taking the oath of fidelity to the flag, April 24th,…

"The departure of Colonel Ellsworth's Zouaves from New york, escorted by the fire department- the regiment and escort passing the corner of Broadway and Canal Street, April 29th, 1861. The Fire Zouaves, under command of Colonel Ellsworth, mustering over eleven hundred strong, embarked on board the <em>Baltic</em>, on Monday, April 29th, 1861, amid a most enthusiastic ovation. Chosen from so popular a corps as the firemen of New York, they could not fail to arouse public sympathy to a large extent. As it was generally known that three separate stands of colors would be presented to them- one at their barracks, another by Mrs. Astor, and the third at the Astor House by Mr. Stetson- an immense crowd attended every movement of this gallant regiment. The first flag was presented by Mr. Wickham, on behalf of the Fire Department and Common Council. The Hon. J. A. Dix then, in behalf of Mrs. Augusta Astor, presented them with another stand of colors, with a very handsome letter from the fair donor. The regiment then marched through Bond Street, the Bowery and Chatham Street to the Astor House, where Mr. Stetson presented them with a third flag in the name of the ladies of the house. After a short soldierly response from the colonel, the regiment with their noble escort, marched to the foot of Canal Street, where they embarked on board the <em>Baltic</em>, which steamed down the river on her way to Annapolis." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Ellsworth's Zouaves

"The departure of Colonel Ellsworth's Zouaves from New york, escorted by the fire department- the regiment…