"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle grounds of New Jersey. This picture is of Runyon's aid-de-camp, Captain James B. mulligan, of Elizabeth, N. J." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Aid-de-camp

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle…

One of the greatest of the Girondists, was born at Marseilles, March 6, 1767. At first an advocate and journalist at Marseilles, he was sent by that city to the Constituent Assembly at Paris. There he opposed the Court party, and took part with the Minister, Roland, then out of favor. After the events of the 10th of August, 1792, he returned to his native town, where he was received with enthusiasm, and was soon after chosen delegate to the Convention. In the Convention he adhered to the Girondists, and belonged to the party who, at the trial of the King, voted for an appeal to the people. He boldly opposed the party of Marat and Robespierre, and even directly accused the latter of aiming at the dictatorship; consequently, he was, in May, 1793, proscribed as a royalist and enemy of the Republic. He fled to Calvados, and thence with a few friends to the Gironde, where he wandered about country, hiding himself as he best could for about 13 months. At last, on the point of being taken, he tried to shoot himself; but the shot miscarried, and he was guillotined at Bordeaux, June 25, 1794. This "brave and beautiful young Spartan" was one of the great spirits of the Revolution. There was no loftier-minded dreamer in the Girondist ranks; hardly a nobler head than his fell in that reign of terror. He was "ripe in energy, not ripe in wisdom," says Carlyle, or the history of France might have been different.

Charles Jean Marie Barbaroux

One of the greatest of the Girondists, was born at Marseilles, March 6, 1767. At first an advocate and…

An Italian military officer; formed the first regular company of Italian troops organized to resist foreign mercenaries, about 1379. This organization, named the "Company of St. George," proved to be an admirable school, as from its ranks sprang many future officers of renown. He became Grand Constaable of Naples in 1384, and died in 1409.

Abrecht da Barbiano

An Italian military officer; formed the first regular company of Italian troops organized to resist…

A French Jacobin, born in Province, in 1755, of an ancient family; served as second lieutenant in the regiment of Languedoc until 1775. He made, about this time, a voyage to the Isle-de-France, the governor of which was one of his relations, and entered into the garrison of Pondicherry. On his return, he gave himself up to gambling and women, and dissipated his fortune. The Revolution broke out. He immediately showed himself an opponent of the Court, and had a seat in the <em>tiers-etat</em>, while his brother was sitting in that of the nobility. July 14, 1789, he took part in the attack upon the Bastille, and Aug. 10, 1792, upon the Tuileries. In 1792 he was elected a member of the National Convention, and voted for the unconditional death of Louis XVI. He was sent, in 1793, to the South of France, and commanded the left wing of the besieging army under Dugommier, and it was here that he first met Napoleon Bonaparte, then captain of artillery. The patriotic reputation of Barras was so well established that he abd Freron were the only representatives not denounced by the popular societies. Robespierre, however, was friend of his, and often wished to arrest him. Barras, knowing this, became one of the principle actors of the 9th Thermidor, and put himself at the head of the troops which surrounded Robespierre at the Hotel de Ville. In 1794 he was named one of the Committee of Public Safety, and became a great enemy to the members of the members of the "Mountain." In February, 1795, he was elected President of the Convention, and, in that capacity, declared Paris in a state of siege, when the Assembly was attacked by the populace. Afterward, when the Convention was assailed, Bonaparte, by Barras' advice, was appointed to command the artillery; and that general, on the 13th Vendemaire, decisively repressed the royalist movement. For his services, Barras was now named one of the Directory, and took a prominent part in the changes which that body unerwent until Napoleon's <em>coup d'etat</em> on the 18th Brumaire, which effectually overthrew the power of Barrras and his colleagues. His life, from this date, was, generally speaking, one of retirement. He died in Paris, Jan. 29, 1829. His "Memoirs" appeared in 1895.

Comte de Barras

A French Jacobin, born in Province, in 1755, of an ancient family; served as second lieutenant in the…

One of the most distinguished masters of the Floretine school of painting, born at Savignano, in Tuscany, in 1469. His subjects are mostly religious, and the greater part belong to the later period of his life. He was a warm adherent of Savonarola, after whose tragical end in 1500 he took the habit of the cloister. He imparted to Raphael his knowledge of coloring, and acquired from him a more perfect knowledge of perspective. He died in Florence in 1517.

Fra Bartolommeo

One of the most distinguished masters of the Floretine school of painting, born at Savignano, in Tuscany,…

Daniel Boone as a hunter when he was a boy

Daniel Boone

Daniel Boone as a hunter when he was a boy

Boone trying to eat

Daniel Boone

Boone trying to eat

Daniel Boone escapes

Daniel Boone

Daniel Boone escapes

"Traveling in state"- General Burnside on the road from New Berne to Beaufort, N. C.

General Burnside

"Traveling in state"- General Burnside on the road from New Berne to Beaufort, N. C.

"President Lincoln, attended by General McClellan and staff, reviewing the Federal army, on Tuesday, July 8th, 1862, near Harrison's Landing, Va." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Review of Federal Army

"President Lincoln, attended by General McClellan and staff, reviewing the Federal army, on Tuesday,…

"Incident in the march of General Banks's Division during a storm in Western Maryland." — Frank Leslie, 1896

March of General Banks

"Incident in the march of General Banks's Division during a storm in Western Maryland." — Frank Leslie,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"Successful charge of Company H, first Massachusetts regiment (Captain Carruth), on a Confederate redan before Yorktown, April 26th, 1862. On the morning of Saturday, April 26th, 1862, Company H of the first Massachusetts Volunteers, led by Camptain Carruth, made a most brilliant charge on a Confederate redoubt, and took it at the point of the bayonet. It was defended by a company of the First Virginia Regiment, who fought with that Old Dominion valor which, to use a phrase probably heard before, "was worthy of a better cause." The Federals were exposed to a most galling fire from the instant they left the shelter of the woods until they reached the brink of the deep ditch fronting the parapet." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Company H

"Successful charge of Company H, first Massachusetts regiment (Captain Carruth), on a Confederate redan…

"Captain Knapp's Battery engaging the Confederates at the battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862- this battery fired the first and last shot. Captain Knapp's battery deserved great credit; it's firing was admirable; and although the first to fire a shot, it was also the last. Several times did this skillful soldier and his well-trained men check the advance of the enemy, and finally compelled him to retire. The skill with which Captain Knapp chose his position was very consipicuous, and was much commended by General banks." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Captain Knapp

"Captain Knapp's Battery engaging the Confederates at the battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862-…

Lincoln rail splitting

Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln rail splitting

"Heroic conduct of Lieutenant Colonel Morrison, Seventy-Ninth New York Highlanders, on the parapet of the Tower Battery, James Island, S. C." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Lieutenant Colonel Morrison

"Heroic conduct of Lieutenant Colonel Morrison, Seventy-Ninth New York Highlanders, on the parapet of…

"General Rosecrans, commanding the Department of Western Virginia, surrounded by his staff, at their headquarters, Clarksburg, VA. We present to our readers a most interesting and valuable sketch of General Rosecrans and his staff- a sketch rendered all the more interesting by the brilliant triumph he gained over the Mercury of the Confederates, Floyd. We enumerate the names of the gallant men who so efficiently carried out the plans of their chief: Joseph Derr, Jr., private secretary; Captain C. Kingsbury, Jr., aid-de-camp; Captain N. P. Richmond, adjutant, and Captain Charles Leib, quartermaster." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Rosecrans

"General Rosecrans, commanding the Department of Western Virginia, surrounded by his staff, at their…

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle grounds of New Jersey. This picture is a portrait of the brigadier general, Theodore Runyon, of Newark, N. J." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Theodore Runyon

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle…

"Escorting Major Taylor, of New Orleans, the bearer of a flag of truce, blindfolded, to the Confederate lines, after his unsuccessful mission. On the 8th of July, 1861, the pickets of the Eight New York Regiment, Colonel Lyons, observed a small party of Confederate soldiers approaching with a flag of truce. This proved to be from Manassas junction, and protected Major Taylor, of New Orleans, who bore letters from Jefferson Davis and General Beauregard to President Lincoln and General Scott. Colonel Lyons telegraphed to Washington, and in reply received orders to send the dispatches on. A council was held, when the dispatches from the eminent Confederates were read. It is sufficient to say that no answer was given, and Major Taylor was conducted to the Confederate lines in the manner portrayed in our sketch." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Major Taylor

"Escorting Major Taylor, of New Orleans, the bearer of a flag of truce, blindfolded, to the Confederate…