Attack of the gunboats at Fort Donelson, one of the most influential battles in American history. This view is southwest. The attack of General Smith was from the ground behind the house on the right.

Attack of the Gunboats at Fort Donelson

Attack of the gunboats at Fort Donelson, one of the most influential battles in American history. This…

"Group of Confederate prisoners captured at Fort Donelson, on the morning after the surrender, clothed in bed blankets, pieces of carpeting, etc. The Confederate prisoners who lounged around the fort the day after its surrender presented a state of haggard misery which took all the romance out of rebellion and made it seem the horrible thing it was. The prisoners had the double aspect of wretchedness- that of the countenance and of the garb." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate prisoners

"Group of Confederate prisoners captured at Fort Donelson, on the morning after the surrender, clothed…

Fort Donelson and Fort Heiman, two sites of the American Civil War Forts Henry and Donelson Campaign, in which Union General Ulysses S. Grant and Admiral Andrew Hull Foote captured three forts, opened two rivers, and received national recognition for victories in February 1862, the first major Union victories of the war.

Fort Donelson

Fort Donelson and Fort Heiman, two sites of the American Civil War Forts Henry and Donelson Campaign,…

Groups of people gathered on the shores of a river.

Fort Donelson After Its Surrender

Groups of people gathered on the shores of a river.

"Storming of Fort Donelson- decisive bayonet charge of the Iowa Second Regiment on the Confederate intrenchments at Fort Donelson, February 15th, 1862, resulting in the capture of the works on the following morning. The Iowa Second Regiment led the charge, followed by the rest in their order. The sight was sublime. Onward they sped, heedless of the bullets and balls of the enemy above. The hill was so steep, the timber cleared, that the Confederates left a gap in their lines of rifle pits on this crest of hill. Through this gap they were bound to go. Right up they went, climbing upon all fours, their line of dark-blue clothing advancing regularly forward, the white line of smoke from the top of the works opposed by a line of the Federal troops. "They reach the top. Numbers fall. The surprise was breathless. See, they climb over the works- they fall- they are lost! Another group, and still another and another, close up the gap. All is covered in smoke. The lodgment is made; the troops swarm up the hillside, their bright bayonets glittering in the sun. The firing slackens. Close behind the brigade Captain Stone's batery of rifled 10-pounders was tugging up the hill, the horses plunging, the riders whipping. Upward they go, where never vehicle went before- up the precipitous and clogged sides of the hill. No sooner on the crest than the guns were unlimbered, the men at their posts. Percussion shells and canister were shot spitefully from the Parrott guns at the flying enemy. The day was gained, cheers upon cheers rent the air, and in a few minutes all was hushed."" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Storming of Fort Donelson

"Storming of Fort Donelson- decisive bayonet charge of the Iowa Second Regiment on the Confederate intrenchments…

"General Lewis Wallace, born in Brookville, Frankly County, Ind., April 10th, 1827, served in the Mexican War as first lieutenant of Company H, First Indiana Infantry. At the beginning of the Civil War he was appointed adjutant general of Indiana, soon afterward becoming colonel of the Eleventh Indiana Volunteers, with which he served in Western Virginia. He became brigadier general of volunteers, September 3rd, 1861; led a division at the capture of Fort Donelson, and displayed such ability that his commission of major general of volunteers followed on March 2nd 1862. In 1863 he prepared the defenses of Cincinnati, and was subsequently assigned to the command of the Eighth Army Corps. With 5,800 men he intercepted the march of General Early, with 28,000 men, on Washington, D. C.; and on July 9th, 1864, he fought the battle of the Monoocacy. General Wallace was mustered out of the volunteer service in 1865." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Lewis Wallace

"General Lewis Wallace, born in Brookville, Frankly County, Ind., April 10th, 1827, served in the Mexican…