"Flag of Morgan's Rifle Corps."—Lossing, 1851

Morgan's Flag

"Flag of Morgan's Rifle Corps."—Lossing, 1851

"The New England flag. This is copied from an old Dutch work, preserved in the library of the New York Historical Society, containing pictures of the flags of all nations. In the original, a divided sphere, representing the earth, is in the quarter where I have placed the pine-tree. I have made the alteration in the device, because in the flag raised upon the bastion of the redoubt on Breed's Hill, the pine-tree occupied the place of the sphere, the more ancient device. The question has been unsettled respecting the flag used on that occasion, as contemporary writers are silent on the subject. An intelligent old lady (Mrs. Manning) whom I saw between the Brandywine and Kennet Square, in Pennsylvania, informed me that her father, who was in the battle, assisted in hoisting the standard, and she had heard him speak of it as a 'noble flag.' The ground was blue, and one corner was quartered by the red cross of St. George, in one section of which was the pine-tree. This was the New England flag, as given in the sketch. Doubtless there were many other flags belonging to the several regiments."—Lossing, 1851

New England flag

"The New England flag. This is copied from an old Dutch work, preserved in the library of the New York…

"Great Seal of the State of North Carolina."—Lossing, 1851

North Carolina Seal

"Great Seal of the State of North Carolina."—Lossing, 1851

The original seal of the United States of America.

Original US Seal

The original seal of the United States of America.

"The Pine-Tree Flag. This engraving is a reduced copy of a vignette on a map of Boston, published in Paris in 1776. The <em>London Chronicle</em>, an anti-ministerial paper, in its issue for Kanuary, 1776, gives the following description of the flag, of an American cruiser that had been captured: 'In the Admirally office is the flag of a provincial privateer."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Pine-Tree Flag

"The Pine-Tree Flag. This engraving is a reduced copy of a vignette on a map of Boston, published in…

"Pulaski's Banner. On the other side, in the center, is the All-seeing Eye, with the words Non Alius Regit; 'No other governs.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Pulaski's Banner Back

"Pulaski's Banner. On the other side, in the center, is the All-seeing Eye, with the words Non Alius…

"Pulaski's Banner. On one side of the banner are the letters U. S., and in a circle around them the words Unita Virtus Forcior; 'United valor is stronger.' The letter C in the last word is incorrect; it should be T."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Pulaski's Banner Front

"Pulaski's Banner. On one side of the banner are the letters U. S., and in a circle around them the…

A seal representing the stamp act.

Stamp Act

A seal representing the stamp act.

A seal representing the stamp act.

Stamp Act

A seal representing the stamp act.

"Seal and signature of Tryon. William Tryon was a native of Ireland, and was educated to the profession of a soldier. He was an officer in the British service. He married Miss Wake, a relative of the Earl of Hillsborough, secretary for the colonies. Thus connected, he was a favorite of government, and was appointed lieutenant governor of North Carolina, in 1765. On the death of Governor Dobbs, he succeeded him in office, and exercised its functions until called to fill the same office in New York, in 1771. The history of his administration in North Carolina is a record of extortion, folly, and crime. During his administration in New York, the Revolution broke out, and he was the last royal governor of that state, though nominally succeeded in office in 1780 by General Robertson, when he was returned to England. His property in North Carolina and in New York was confiscated."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Tryon Seal

"Seal and signature of Tryon. William Tryon was a native of Ireland, and was educated to the profession…

"Union Flag. The first recognized Continental Standard, raised for the first time January 2, 1776."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Union flag

"Union Flag. The first recognized Continental Standard, raised for the first time January 2, 1776."—E.…

"Banner of Washington's Life Guard."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Washington's Life Guard

"Banner of Washington's Life Guard."—Lossing, 1851