Known as "The Great Compromiser" and "The Great Pacifier" for his ability to bring others to agreement, he was the founder and leader of the Whig Party. Pictured here is Clay's monument at Lexington, KY.

Clay's Monument at Lexington, KY

Known as "The Great Compromiser" and "The Great Pacifier" for his ability to bring others to agreement,…

"Battle ground at Concord. This view, looking southeast, is from the road leading to the village, by the way of the North Bridge, to the residence of Mr. Prescott Barrett. The point from which the sketch was made is upon an elevation a little north of that where the militia assembled under Colonel Barrett. The stream of water is the Concord, or Sudbury River. The site of the North Bridge is at the monument seen in the center of the picture. The monument stands upon the spot where the British were stationed, and in the plain, directly across the river from the monument, is the place where Davis and Hosmer, of the American militia, were killed. The house, the roof and gable of which are seen in the distance, just on the left of the largest tree, was the residence of the Reverend Dr. Ripley (afterward a chaplain in the army) at the time of the skirmish. It is upon the road elading to Concord village, which lies nearly half a mile beyond."—Lossing, 1851

Battleground at Concord

"Battle ground at Concord. This view, looking southeast, is from the road leading to the village, by…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

A view of the Battle of Lexington during the American Revolutionary War.

Battle of Lexington

A view of the Battle of Lexington during the American Revolutionary War.