"The attack upon the batteries at the entrance of Acquia Creek, Potomac River, by the United States vessels <em>Pawnee</em>, <em>Yankee</em>, <em>Thomas Freeborn</em>, <em>Anacosta</em>, and <em>Resolute</em>, June 1st, 1861. On May 31st Captain Ward, in command on board of the <em>Thomas Freeborn</em>, and assisted by two more of his gunboats, the <em>Resolute</em> and the <em>Anacosta</em>, began the attack on the Confederate batteries, and after a two hours' fight, succeeded in silencing the batteries at the landing; but, for want of long-range ammunition, could not effectually respond to the heavy fire from the heights, and so had to withdraw. The following day, however, with aditional aid from the <em>Pawnee</em> and <em>Yankee</em>, the attack was resumed, and the batteries were at last silenced and the Confederates compelled to retreat."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Acquia Creek

"The attack upon the batteries at the entrance of Acquia Creek, Potomac River, by the United States…

Naval battle between an American ship and an Algerine corsair.

Capture of an Algerine Corsair

Naval battle between an American ship and an Algerine corsair.

Commodore Perry at the Battle of Lake Erie

Commodore Perry at the Battle of Lake Erie

Commodore Perry at the Battle of Lake Erie

The Constitution engaging two British ships, the Cyane and Levant.

The Consititution Capturing the Cyane and Levant

The Constitution engaging two British ships, the Cyane and Levant.

"First naval battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate iron-plated steamers <em>Merrimac, Yorktown</em>, and <em>Jamestown</em>, and the Federal wooden sailing frigates <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>- sinking of the <em>Cumberland</em> by a blow from the <em>Merrimac</em>, March 8th, 1862- sketched by our special artist. About noon on the 8th, a suspicious-looking vessel, looking like a submerged house, with the roof only above water, was discovered, moving down from Norfolk, by the channel in front of Sewall's Point batteries. There was nothing protruding above the water but a flagstaff flying the Confederate flag and a short smokestack. She moved along slowly, and turned into the channel leading to Newport News, and steamed direct for the wooden sailing frigates <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>, which were lying at the mouth of James River. As soon as she came within range of the <em>Cumberland</em>, the latter opened on her with her heavy guns; but the balls struck and glanced off without effect. In the meantime, as the <em>Merrimac</em> was approaching the two frigates on one side, the Confederate ironclad steamers <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> came down James River, and engaged the frigates on the other side. The batteries at Newport News also opened on the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em>, and did all in their power to assist the <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>, which, being sailing vessels, were at the mercy of the approaching steamers. The <em>Merrimac</em>, in the meantime, kept steadily on her course, and slowly approached the <em>Cumberland</em>, when she and the <em>Congress</em>, at a distance of one hundred yards, rained full broadsides on the ironclad monters without effect. After receiving the first broadside of the two frigates, she ran on to the <em>Cumberland</em>, striking her about midship, and literally laying open her bow, left her to sink, while she engaged the <em>Congress</em>, which lay about a quarter of a mile distant. The <em>Congress</em>, having no regular crew on board of her, and seeing the hopelessness of resisting the ironclad steamer, at once struck her colors." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

First naval battle

"First naval battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate iron-plated steamers Merrimac, Yorktown,…

Gunboat fight during the Civil War.

Gunboat Fight

Gunboat fight during the Civil War.

The sinking of the Alabama by the Union Kearsarge. Some Confederates aboard the Alabama escaped to England aboard the nearby British yacht Deerhound.

Kearsarge Sinking the Alabama

The sinking of the Alabama by the Union Kearsarge. Some Confederates aboard the Alabama escaped to England…

A large cannon placed on naval ships during the American Revolution.

Long Tom

A large cannon placed on naval ships during the American Revolution.

The Mississippi at Port Hudson, Louisiana.

Mississippi at Port Hudson

The Mississippi at Port Hudson, Louisiana.

The Battle of Mobile Bay was a naval battle fought on August 5, 1864, during the American Civil War.

Opening of the Battle of Mobile Bay

The Battle of Mobile Bay was a naval battle fought on August 5, 1864, during the American Civil War.

The Siege of Fort Morgan occurred during the American Civil War as part of the battle for Mobile Bay in 1864.

Capture of Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay

The Siege of Fort Morgan occurred during the American Civil War as part of the battle for Mobile Bay…

"Farragut's naval victory in Mobile Harbor. The <em>Hartford</em> engaging the Confederate ram <em>Tennessee</em>. Official report of the engagement: 'The engagement with the enemy's fleet took place on the west side of Mobile Bay, in the direction of Fort Powell, and out of range of the guns of Fort Morgan. The <em>Tennessee</em> boldly steamed in the direction of our fleet, as if for the purpose of running down and destroying the wooden vessels, without paying attention to the monitors, except to keep out of their way; but they persevered in following her and cutting her off, when her whole attention was forced to be directed to them. The fighting did not last long between them, however, for the flagship and the <em>Monongahela</em> steamed in the direction of the <em>Tennessee</em>, the <em>Monongahela</em> striking her amidships with her terrible prow, causing the huge Confederate monster to reel like a drunken man. The <em>Hartford</em> then grappled the <em>Tennessee</em>, but further bloodshed was saved by the latter hoisting the white flag from the pilot-house. Captain Pierre Giraud led the party who boarded the ram, and the Confederate Admiral Buchanana delivered up his sword to him.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Mobile Harbor

"Farragut's naval victory in Mobile Harbor. The Hartford engaging the Confederate ram Tennessee.…

Navy soldiers on the deck of the Monitor, a warship famous for the battle with the Merrimac.

Monitor

Navy soldiers on the deck of the Monitor, a warship famous for the battle with the Merrimac.

Famous Stalemate between the Monitor and Merrimac.

Moniter and Merrimac

Famous Stalemate between the Monitor and Merrimac.

Fight between the <em>Chesapeake</em> and <em>Shannon</em>.

Naval Battle

Fight between the Chesapeake and Shannon.

Three ships engaged in a naval battle.

Naval Battle

Three ships engaged in a naval battle.

"Second naval battle in Hampton Roads- fight between the Federal ironclad <em>Monitor</em>, of two guns, and the Confederate iron-plated steamers <em>Merrimac, Yorktown</em>, and <em>Jamestown</em>, carrying twenty-four guns, March 9th, 1862. But the gloom that had begun to settle on the fort was greatly dispelled when, toward midnight, an iron marine monster, unlike anything that had ever before been seen on the ocean, made its appearance off the forts. It proved to be the Ericsson iron floating battery of two guns, just from new York. The state of affairs was hastily explained to her commander, and she steamed off to the rescue of the deserted <em>Minnesota</em>. When day dawned the Confederate flotilla, flushed with the success of the previous day, bored down on what was supposed to be an easy prey. the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> drawing least water (The <em>Merrimac</em> evidently afraid of grounding) were ahead, when their course was suddenly stopped by the strange craft, which seemed to have dropped from the clouds. They thought to overcome her easily, and opened fire confidently; but a few of the heavy shot of the <em>Monitor</em>, which battered through and through their iron sides, drove them back in panic behind the gigantic <em>Merrimac</em>, against which the <em>Monitor</em> advanced in turn. And then commenced the most extraordinary naval contest known to history- the first battle between ironclad steamers every fought, and one in which all the appliances of modern skill were brought in conflict. The fight lasted for nearly five hours, when the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> fled up the James River, and the <em>Merrimac</em>, disabled, and in a sinking condition, retreated into Norfolk. The <em>Minnesota</em>, having grounded, was then got off, and the <em>Mintor</em>, a proud proof of the designer's genius and skill, rode undisputed monarch of Hampton waters." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Second naval battle

"Second naval battle in Hampton Roads- fight between the Federal ironclad Monitor, of two guns,…

A George Washington coin above a naval battle.

Washington Coin

A George Washington coin above a naval battle.

Naval battle between the Union Weehawken and Confederate Atlanta.

Action between the Weehawken and Confederate Iron-clad Atlanta

Naval battle between the Union Weehawken and Confederate Atlanta.