The attack on New Orleans, during the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812.

Attack on New Orleans

The attack on New Orleans, during the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812.

"Burning of the Confederate gunboats, rams, etc., at New Orleans and Algiers, on the approach of the Federal fleet." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of Confederate gunboats

"Burning of the Confederate gunboats, rams, etc., at New Orleans and Algiers, on the approach of the…

A cotton press yard of the Cotton Centennial in the 1884 World's Fair in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Cotton Centennial

A cotton press yard of the Cotton Centennial in the 1884 World's Fair in New Orleans, Louisiana.

When civil law was restored, Jackson was fined for contempt of court for proclaiming martial law in New Orleans.

The Old Courthouse Where Jackson was Fined for Contempt of Court

When civil law was restored, Jackson was fined for contempt of court for proclaiming martial law in…

James Biddle Eustis (August 27, 1834 - September 9, 1887) was a United States Senator from Louisiana.

James Biddle Eustis

James Biddle Eustis (August 27, 1834 - September 9, 1887) was a United States Senator from Louisiana.

"Panoramic view of the Federal fleet passing the forts of the Mississippi, on its way to New Orleans, LA., April 19th, 1862. The bombardment of the forts lasted six days, commencing on Friday, April 18th, and practically closing on the 24th, when Flag Officer Farragut passed up with his fleet, Captain Bailey, in the <em>Cayuga</em>, leading. First Division- Captain Bailey commanding: <em>Cayuga, Pensacola, Mississippi, Oneida, Varuna, Katahdin, Kineo, Wissahickon, Portsmouth</em>, towed by <em>J. P. Jackson</em>. Second Division- Flag Officer Farragut commanding: <em>Hartford, Brooklyn, Richmond</em>. Third Division- Captain Bell, commanding: <em>Scioto, Iroquois, Pinola, Itasca, Winona, Kennebec</em>. On Friday, April 25th, at twenty-two minutes past one, this magnificent fleet brought up before the renowned city of New Orleans in battle array. A flag of truce was immediately dispatched by Flag Officer Farragut, demanding an immediate and unconditional surrender." —Leslie, 1896

Federal fleet

"Panoramic view of the Federal fleet passing the forts of the Mississippi, on its way to New Orleans,…

The headquarters of Andrew Jackson in New Orleans during the War of 1812.

Jackson's Headquarters

The headquarters of Andrew Jackson in New Orleans during the War of 1812.

During the War of 1812, when British forces threatened New Orleans, Jackson took command of the defenses, including militia from several western states and territories.

Jackson's Headquarters, New Orleans

During the War of 1812, when British forces threatened New Orleans, Jackson took command of the defenses,…

"Naval action between the United States war steamer <em>Mississippi</em> and the Confederate iron-cased floating battery ram and other steamers, off the mouth of the Pass A L'outre, New Orleans, January 1st, 1862."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Naval battle

"Naval action between the United States war steamer Mississippi and the Confederate iron-cased…

View of New Orleans in 1719

New Orleans

View of New Orleans in 1719

New Orleans in 1719

New Orleans

New Orleans in 1719

A scene of swampy New Orleans, Louisiana in 1719.

New Orleans in 1719

A scene of swampy New Orleans, Louisiana in 1719.

Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans

Battle of New Orleans

Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans

The levee at New Orleans, Louisiana in the 1800's.

The Levee at New Orleans

The levee at New Orleans, Louisiana in the 1800's.

A drawing of a street in old New Orleans, Louisiana.

A Bit of Old New Orleans

A drawing of a street in old New Orleans, Louisiana.

The pecan trees at Villere's in New Orleans.

Pecan Trees

The pecan trees at Villere's in New Orleans.

"Bird's-eye view of the burning of a Confederate schooner in Quantico or Dumfries Creek, Potomac River, on the night of October 11th, 1861. On the 10th of October, 1861, Lieutenant Harrell, commanding the steamer <em>Union</em>, of the Potomac Flotilla, stationed at the mouth of Aquia Creek, learning that the Confederates had fitted out a large schooner in Quantico or Dumfries Creek, and had collected a considerable body of troops there, with the intention of crossing the Potomac, determined that the vessel should be destroyed. He accordingly organized an expedition, and with one boat and two launches entered the mouth of the creek about half-past two o'clock on the morning of the 11th. The schooner was discovered some distance up, in charge of a single sentry, who fled and gave the alarm. She was immediately boarded and set on fire; and when her destruction was rendered certain Lieutenant Harrell's men returned to their boats and pulled again for the steamer. Their position was fully revealed by the light of the burning schooner, and they were fired upon continuously from both banks of the narrow stream, but not one of them was injured, though their clothing in many instances was perforated with bullets. The success of the enterprise was complete."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate schooner

"Bird's-eye view of the burning of a Confederate schooner in Quantico or Dumfries Creek, Potomac River,…

A slave auction in New Orleans, Louisiana.

A Slave Auction in New Orleans

A slave auction in New Orleans, Louisiana.

"Escorting Major Taylor, of New Orleans, the bearer of a flag of truce, blindfolded, to the Confederate lines, after his unsuccessful mission. On the 8th of July, 1861, the pickets of the Eight New York Regiment, Colonel Lyons, observed a small party of Confederate soldiers approaching with a flag of truce. This proved to be from Manassas junction, and protected Major Taylor, of New Orleans, who bore letters from Jefferson Davis and General Beauregard to President Lincoln and General Scott. Colonel Lyons telegraphed to Washington, and in reply received orders to send the dispatches on. A council was held, when the dispatches from the eminent Confederates were read. It is sufficient to say that no answer was given, and Major Taylor was conducted to the Confederate lines in the manner portrayed in our sketch." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Major Taylor

"Escorting Major Taylor, of New Orleans, the bearer of a flag of truce, blindfolded, to the Confederate…

Jacques Phillippe Viller&eacute; (April 28, 1761 - 7 March 1830) was the second Governor of Louisiana after it became a state. Pictured is his home in New Orleans.

Villere's mansion

Jacques Phillippe Villeré (April 28, 1761 - 7 March 1830) was the second Governor of Louisiana…